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To J. S. Henslow   12 November 1833

Summary

Is sending a cargo of specimens – birds’ skins, small quadrupeds, and fossil bones.

Describes his overland trip from Rio Negro to Buenos Aires and his expedition to Santa Fé.

Asks for mineralogical works to help him with the volcanic rocks of the west coast.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  John Stevens Henslow
Date:  12 Nov 1833
Classmark:  Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew (Henslow letters: 20 DAR/1/1/20)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-229

To J. S. Henslow   4 August [1858]

Summary

CD and his family have come to the seashore, driven from home by scarlet fever at Down, death [of Charles Waring Darwin], and other family illness. Sorry to miss seeing JSH.

Would be grateful to hear his objections to CD’s species speculations.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  John Stevens Henslow
Date:  4 Aug [1858]
Classmark:  DAR 93: A53–4
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-2320

To J. S. Henslow   25 September [1857]

Summary

Thanks JSH for his magnificent present. Hopes Hooker will bring the specimens.

Have water-fowl ever been seen at Ipswich on Mr Ransome’s great tank?

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  John Stevens Henslow
Date:  25 Sept [1857]
Classmark:  DAR 93: A58–9
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-2329

To J. S. Henslow   9 November [1858]

Summary

Arrangements to meet JSH at station for his visit to Down.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  John Stevens Henslow
Date:  9 Nov [1858]
Classmark:  DAR 93: A60–1
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-2356

To J. S. Henslow   March 1834

Summary

On fossils ([Megatherium], etc.), plants, shells sent and new ones found; geological observations. Asks for help in understanding cleavage and planes of deposition.

A new species of ostrich. Cites differences in size, colour, nidification, and geographical distribution.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  John Stevens Henslow
Date:  Mar 1834
Classmark:  Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew (Henslow letters: 21 DAR/1/1/21)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-238

To J. S. Henslow   24 July – 7 November 1834

Summary

CD is excited by JSH’s high opinion of his collections.

Discusses his notes and some new discoveries. Summary of events since leaving Falklands.

Geology of Patagonia.

Corallines at Tierra del Fuego convince him of artificiality of arrangement of their families by Lamarck and Cuvier.

Geological expedition in Andes, ending with serious illness. Specimens being sent.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  John Stevens Henslow
Date:  24 July & 28 Oct & 7 Nov 1834
Classmark:  Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew (Henslow letters: 22 DAR/1/1/22)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-251

To J. S. Henslow   11 November 1859

Summary

Sends the Origin to his "dear old master in natural history"; fears he will not approve of his pupil in this case. Asks for criticisms. If JSH is even in slight degree staggered on the immutability of species, CD is convinced that he will be more staggered on further reflection – this has been the process of his own mind.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  John Stevens Henslow
Date:  11 Nov 1859
Classmark:  DAR 145: 100
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-2522

To J. S. Henslow   4 October 1834

Summary

CD is unwell.

FitzRoy has dispatched two casks of bones and stones, a box with "very valuable specimens", and a large jar.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  John Stevens Henslow
Date:  4 Oct 1834
Classmark:  Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew (Henslow letters: 23 DAR/1/1/23)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-258

To J. S. Henslow   8 November 1834

Summary

Sends two boxes of specimens and part of his "hum-drum letter-like" journal.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  John Stevens Henslow
Date:  8 Nov 1834
Classmark:  Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew (Henslow letters: 24 DAR/1/1/24)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-263

To J. S. Henslow   10 January [1859]

Summary

Thanks JSH for specimens. Comments on the structure of a hornet comb and asks JSH to obtain some fresh combs for him and to make observations for him. He is greatly interested in "these wondrous architectural instincts".

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  John Stevens Henslow
Date:  10 Jan [1859]
Classmark:  DAR 93: A120–A121
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-2648

To J. S. Henslow   3 February [1860]

Summary

Thanks for L. Jenyns’ very sensible letter [missing].

Will be delighted to see JSH whenever he can come.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  John Stevens Henslow
Date:  3 Feb [1860]
Classmark:  DAR 93: A62
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-2682

To J. S. Henslow   9 February [1860]

Summary

Sends directions for JSH’s journey to Bromley and Down.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  John Stevens Henslow
Date:  9 Feb [1860]
Classmark:  DAR 93: A63–4
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-2691

To J. S. Henslow   [10] – 13 March 1835

Summary

The termination of the voyage has been decided – September 1836.

The earthquake of Concepción.

His geological observations (since November). Can now prove both sides of the Andes have recently risen to considerable heights.

Zoological collection.

Plans to cross the Cordilleras.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  John Stevens Henslow
Date:  [10]–13 Mar 1835
Classmark:  Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew (Henslow letters: 25 DAR/1/1/25)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-272

To J. S. Henslow   18 April 1835

Summary

Has just returned from crossing the Cordilleras. Geological observations of formations representing great epochs of violence which broke up the earth’s crust. Shells at over 12000 feet. Silicified trees in sandstone formations at great heights. Red snow and viviparous lizards. Botanical specimens.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  John Stevens Henslow
Date:  18 Apr 1835
Classmark:  Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew (Henslow letters: 26 DAR/1/1/26)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-274

To J. S. Henslow   2 April [1860]

Summary

Reminds JSH to send "sketch & account of the wasp’s comb in transitional state from horizontal to vertical, & the country whence procured".

Asks for information on spread of Anacharis [Elodea].

Sedgwick [in criticism of Origin] was not very fair, but Murray says it is splendid for selling copies to "the unfortunate students".

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  John Stevens Henslow
Date:  2 Apr [1860]
Classmark:  DAR 93: A65–6
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-2742

To J. S. Henslow   8 May [1860]

Summary

Comments on Richard Owen’s review of the Origin [in Edinburgh Rev. 111 (1860): 487–532]. Considers Owen unfair to CD and most ungenerous toward Hooker.

Expects Sedgwick to be fierce against him. Sedgwick also misrepresented CD in his Spectator review [24 Mar and 7 Apr 1860].

Compares natural selection to the undulatory theory of light as a hypothesis explaining a large number of facts.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  John Stevens Henslow
Date:  8 May [1860]
Classmark:  DAR 93: A67–9
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-2791

To J. S. Henslow   14 May [1860]

Summary

Thanks JSH for his defence [see 2794].

He is not hurt for long by what his attackers say. His conclusions were arrived at after long study. He has certainly erred, but not so much as "Sedgwick and Co." think.

Asks JSH to send names of plants that vary greatly in length of pistil.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  John Stevens Henslow
Date:  14 May [1860]
Classmark:  DAR 93: A70–1
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-2801

To J. S. Henslow   17 May [1860]

Summary

Sends characters by which he can divide all primroses and cowslips into what he suspects will be male and female plants. Believes these forms are first step in formation of a dioecious plant.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  John Stevens Henslow
Date:  17 May [1860]
Classmark:  DAR 93: A72–3, A116
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-2805

To J. S. Henslow   12 [August] 1835

Summary

Looks forward to seeing volcanoes in Galapagos Islands.

Has altered his views on Cordillera formations as a result of another trip. Discusses his theory of their origin and history.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  John Stevens Henslow
Date:  12 [Aug] 1835
Classmark:  Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew (Henslow letters: 27 DAR/1/1/27)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-283

To J. S. Henslow   16 July [1860]

Summary

Discusses Charles Daubeny’s views on sexuality of plants [Rep. BAAS 30 (1860) pt 2: 109–10]. "There is no greater mystery in the whole world, as it seems to me, than the existence of sexes, – more especially since the discovery of Parthenogenesis."

Says apropos of the FitzRoy Bible incident [at Oxford BAAS meeting], "I think his mind is often on verge of insanity."

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  John Stevens Henslow
Date:  16 July [1860]
Classmark:  DAR 93: A74–5
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-2869
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