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Darwin in letters, 1862: A multiplicity of experiments

Summary

1862 was a particularly productive year for Darwin. This was not only the case in his published output (two botanical papers and a book on the pollination mechanisms of orchids), but more particularly in the extent and breadth of the botanical experiments…

Matches: 7 hits

  • … to be referred to routinely. In November, Joseph Dalton Hooker told him: ‘you are alluded to in no …
  • … of dimorphism. Towards the end of the year, he wrote to Hooker ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 12
  • … students to make observations on American species. Hooker and George Bentham at Kew were also …
  • … least 3 classes of dimorphism’ ( letter to Daniel Oliver, 12 [April 1862] ), and experimenting to …
  • … passed so miserable a nine months’ ( letter to W. D. Fox, 12 September [1862] ). A family …
  • … ‘Botany is a new subject to me’ ( letter to John Scott, 12 November [1862] ), but, impressed by …
  • … into Tyndall’s ears’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 10–12 November [1862] ). Another of Darwin’s …

Darwin in letters, 1874: A turbulent year

Summary

The year 1874 was one of consolidation, reflection, and turmoil for Darwin. He spent the early months working on second editions of Coral reefs and Descent of man; the rest of the year was mostly devoted to further research on insectivorous plants. A…

Matches: 20 hits

  • by observation during prolonged intervals’ ( letter to D. T. Gardner, [ c . 27 August 1874] ). …
  • of shooting and collecting beetles ( letter from W. D. Fox, 8 May [1874] ).  Such reminiscences
  • looks backwards much more than forwards’ ( letter to W. D. Fox, 11 May [1874] ). I
  • hope.— I feel very old & helpless’  ( letter to B. J. Sulivan, 6 January [1874] ). Darwin
  • to believe in such rubbish’, he confided to Joseph Dalton Hooker ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 18
  • the publishers, he applied first to his friend Joseph Dalton Hooker, and finally borrowed one from
  • for misinterpreting Darwin on this point ( letter from J. D. Dana, 21 July 1874 ); however, he did
  • … (letters from George Cupples, 21 February 1874 and 12 March 1874 ); the material was
  • the Sandwich Islands (Hawaii; letters from T. N. Staley, 12 February 1874 and 20 February 1874
  • …  was published in November 1874 ( letter from R. F. Cooke, 12 November 1874 ). Though containing
  • print runs would be very good ( letter from R. F. Cooke, 12 November 1874 ). Darwin's
  • … ‘Im a grown man now’, he reminded Darwin, ‘& sh d . stand on my own footing, & if it is
  • Mivart (see  Correspondence  vol. 20, letter to St G. J. Mivart, 11 January [1872] ). To Darwin
  • Review & in the same type’  ( letter from John Murray, 12 August 1874 ). Georges letter
  • views. In December, he sought advice from Huxley and Hooker, sending them a draft letter that
  • Mivart had written the article ( enclosure to letter from J. D. Hooker, 21 December 1874 ). Huxley
  • to write to Mivart directly after he knew the full result of Hookers and Huxleys representations ( …
  • 15 th  he published that shabby rejoinder’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 24 December [1874] ).  On
  • he finally wrote a polite, very formal letter to Mivart on 12 January 1875 , refusing to hold any
  • … & snugness’ ( letter from Emma Darwin to J. B. Innes, 12 October [1874] ).   More

Darwin in letters, 1863: Quarrels at home, honours abroad

Summary

At the start of 1863, Charles Darwin was actively working on the manuscript of The variation of animals and plants under domestication, anticipating with excitement the construction of a hothouse to accommodate his increasingly varied botanical experiments…

Matches: 11 hits

  • … ‘some Quadrumanum animal’, as he put it in a letter to J. D. Hooker of 24[–5] February [1863] . …
  • … the origin of species particularly, worried Darwin; he told Hooker that he had once thought Lyell …
  • … lack of expertise in the subject. ‘The worst of it is’, Hooker wrote to Darwin, ‘I suppose it is …
  • … credit to his own research and that of Joseph Prestwich. Hooker wrote: ‘I fear L. will get scant …
  • … had contributed to the proofs of human antiquity. Darwin and Hooker repeatedly exchanged regrets …
  • … he had ‘gained nothing’ ( letter to Charles Lyell, 12–13 March [1863] ). poor miserable …
  • … Natural History Review  ( see letter to H. W. Bates, 12 January [1863] ). Darwin added Bates’s …
  • … Society ( see letter from Edward Sabine to John Phillips, 12 November 1863 ). Characteristically, …
  • … also encouraged him to write ( see letter to John Scott, 12 April [1863] ). In this paper, Scott …
  • … to capture his attention ( see letter to John Scott, 12 April [1863] ). Additionally, Darwin …
  • … Huxley, 25 February 1863 , and letter to Charles Lyell, 12–13 March [1863] ). Emma was a …

Darwin in letters, 1865: Delays and disappointments

Summary

The year was marked by three deaths of personal significance to Darwin: Hugh Falconer, a friend and supporter; Robert FitzRoy, captain of the Beagle; and William Jackson Hooker, director of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, and father of Darwin’s friend…

Matches: 17 hits

  • for evaluation, and persuaded his friend Joseph Dalton Hooker to comment on a paper on  Verbascum
  • committed suicide at the end of April; and William Jackson Hooker, director of the Royal Botanic
  • thriving, and when illness made work impossible, Darwin and Hooker read a number of novels, and
  • the Boys at home: they make the house jolly’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 7 January [1865] ). Darwin
  • to accept the award in person (see  Correspondence  vol. 12). In early January Falconer had
  • kind friend to me. So the world goes.—’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 2 February [1865] ). However, …
  • griefs & pains: these alone are unalloyed’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 3 February 1865 ). …
  • Sic transit gloria mundi, with a vengeance’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 9 February [1865] ). …
  • know it is folly & nonsense to try anyone’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 7 January [1865] ). He
  • and Darwin had given it up by early July ( see letter to J. D. Hooker, [10 July 1865] ). In
  • … ‘able to write about an hour on most days’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 22 December [1865] ). …
  • in or before November 1864 ( Correspondence vol. 12, letter to Ernst Haeckel, 21 November [1864
  • in Müllers name ( see letter from Fritz Müller, [12 and 31 August, and 10 October 1865] ; since
  • to find employment in India (see Correspondence vol. 12), sent Darwin the results of his experiments
  • to Darwin may be gathered from Darwins letter to him of 12 July [1865] . Huxley had evidently
  • who also caught it, rapidly succumbed to it and died on 12 August. Hooker himself contracted
  • collection of letters written by Darwin when he was 12 years old. Over half of the letters in the

Darwin in letters, 1879: Tracing roots

Summary

Darwin spent a considerable part of 1879 in the eighteenth century. His journey back in time started when he decided to publish a biographical account of his grandfather Erasmus Darwin to accompany a translation of an essay on Erasmus’s evolutionary ideas…

Matches: 22 hits

  • Darwin had written: ‘The worst thing I find now is this dnd old age, which creeps slily upon one, …
  • Seventy years old Darwins seventieth birthday on 12 February was a cause for international
  • and good as could be’ ( letter from Karl Beger, [ c. 12 February 1879] ). The masters of
  • … ). The botanist and schoolteacher Hermann Müller wrote on 12 February to wish Darwin along and
  • admiration of his grandfather: ‘The more I read of Dr. D. the higher he rises in my estimation.’ …
  • well, and with little fatigue’ ( letter to G. H. Darwin, 12 July 1879 , and letter from Leonard
  • it, leaving Darwinmore perplexed than ever about life of D r . D’ ( letter to Francis Darwin, …
  • Thiselton-Dyer, 5 June 1879 , and letter to G. H. Darwin, 12 July 1879 ). Darwins final task
  • innvery comfortable’, but told Leonard Darwin on 12 August that there weretoo many human
  • which is his profession thonot a profitable one; also D r  C[lark]’s opinion that he was so
  • when the acorns failed to ripen, Darwin had to ask Joseph Hooker to come to his rescue by sending
  • scarlet oak: ‘to be planted in my honour!’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 4 November [1879] ). While in
  • not to have come up when the Darwins lunched with him on 12 August (DarwinsJournal’). Nor did
  • the world. At the end of the year he was awarded a prize of 12,000 francs by the Turin Academy of
  • knowledgeobservation & experiment’ ( letter from J. F. Moulton, 10 December 1879 ). In reply
  • image of the frog be published in Nature ( letter to J. N. Lockyer, 4 and 6 March [1879] ). …
  • and his family to the Riviera for the summer ( letter to G. J. Romanes, 23 July 1879 ). Allen, who
  • which greatly pleased Darwin ( letter from Grant Allen, 12 February 1879 ). One of Allens targets
  • prospects were precarious. Darwin contacted Joseph Hooker on 17 December to ask his opinion: ‘I
  • been saved from amistake & mess’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 19 December [1879] ). The German
  • engagement being made public ( letter from T. H. Farrer, 12 October 1879 ). Darwins response not
  • accurate in its treatment’ ( letter from Francis Galton, 12 November 1879 ). The comment that

Darwin's in letters, 1873: Animal or vegetable?

Summary

Having laboured for nearly five years on human evolution, sexual selection, and the expression of emotions, Darwin was able to devote 1873 almost exclusively to his beloved plants. He resumed work on the digestive powers of sundews and Venus fly traps, and…

Matches: 4 hits

  • … a specimen of the carnivorous  Drosophyllum lusitanicum , Hooker wrote: “Pray work your wicked …
  • … at the end of November 1872 and sold quickly. He wrote to Hooker on 12 January [1873] , “Did I …
  • … ( letter from E. F. Lubbock, [before 7 April 1873] ). Hooker added: “I have beaten my brains to …
  • … to worry, however, that he would overwork himself, and so Hooker volunteered to accompany him on a …

Darwin in letters, 1875: Pulling strings

Summary

‘I am getting sick of insectivorous plants’, Darwin confessed in January 1875. He had worked on the subject intermittently since 1859, and had been steadily engaged on a book manuscript for nine months; January also saw the conclusion of a bitter dispute…

Matches: 12 hits

  • … work of preparing new Editions’, he complained again to Hooker on 18 August. Finally, by …
  • … much more than insectivorous plants. As he confessed to Hooker on 12 December , ‘I have not felt …
  • … from his family, he sent a curt note to Mivart on 12 January , breaking off all future …
  • … honoured George. You have indeed been a true friend.’ Hooker was hampered by his position as …
  • … & if he speaks to me should let him feel it .’ Hooker also directed some of his anger …
  • … thirst for vengeance is now quite Satisfied’, he told Hooker on 17 January , ‘I feel now like a …
  • … of a bill that was presented to the House of Commons on 12 May, one week after a rival bill based on …
  • … firm. Darwin was impressed by the device, remarking to Hooker on 13 October : ‘Horace has made a …
  • … The author, Fritz Schultze, contacted Darwin himself on 12 June , describing the aims of his book …
  • … to the Royal Society on his behalf. Darwin complained to Hooker on 13 October , ‘It is not at all …
  • … had reservations about the paper’s merit. He confessed to Hooker two days later, ‘after agonies of …
  • … scientific Socy. has done in my time,’ he told Hooker on 12 December . ‘I wish that I knew what …

Darwin in letters, 1869: Forward on all fronts

Summary

At the start of 1869, Darwin was hard at work making changes and additions for a fifth edition of  Origin. He may have resented the interruption to his work on sexual selection and human evolution, but he spent forty-six days on the task. Much of the…

Matches: 16 hits

  • correcting’ ( Correspondence  vol. 16, letter to W. D. Fox, 12 December [1868] ). He may have
  • he remarked to his best friend, the botanist Joseph Dalton Hooker, ‘If I lived 20 more years, & …
  • Well it is a beginning, & that is something’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [22 January 1869] ). …
  • Darwin sent a manuscript of his response (now missing) to Hooker, remarking: ‘I should be extremely
  • blunders, as is very likely to be the case’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 13 January 1869 ). Hooker
  • principle (Nägeli 1865, pp. 289). In further letters, Hooker tried to provide Darwin with botanical
  • retrench that position following criticism from his friend Hooker, by admitting that the survival of
  • do fairly well, though if I had read you first, perhaps I d  have been less deferential towards
  • males & females, cocks & hens.—’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 13 November [1869] ). Yet
  • … & contemptalmost hatred—’ ( from Asa Gray and J. L. Gray, 8 and 9 May [1869] ). James
  • by Wallaces assertions: ‘If you had not told me I d  have thought that they had been added by
  • he had studied in the early 1860s ( letter to W. C. Tait, 12 and 16 March 1869 ). This research
  • commentary (Royer trans. 1870). Darwin complained to Hooker, ‘Besides her enormously long & …
  • … [her] to translateDomestic Animals”’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 19 November [1869] ). Angered by
  • of the whole meeting was decidedly Huxleys answer to D r  M c Cann. He literally poured boiling
  • suggestions to its publisher, Macmillan ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 14 November 1869 ).  Darwin

Darwin’s hothouse and lists of hothouse plants

Summary

Darwin became increasingly involved in botanical experiments in the years after the publication of Origin. The building of a small hothouse - a heated greenhouse - early in 1863  greatly increased the range of plants that he could keep for scientific…

Matches: 18 hits

  • purposes’ (see  Correspondence  vol10, letter to JD. Hooker, 24 December [1862] , and
  • … (Down House MS) and  Correspondence  vol5, letter to JD. Hooker, 19 April [1855] ). Darwin
  • to touch (see  Correspondence  vol10, letter to JD. Hooker, 12 [December 1862] and n13). …
  • … [1862] ( Correspondence  vol10) Darwin told Hooker: I have almost resolved to
  • of prizes & is very observant. He believes that we sh d  succeed with a little patience; …
  • mid-January, and completed by mid-February (see letters to JD. Hooker, 13 January [1863] and
  • plants for use in a wide variety of experiments. He told Hooker that he waslooking with much
  • shall keep to curious & experimental plants’ (letter to JD. Hooker, 13 January [1863] ). …
  • with whom he had dealt over many years. In his letter to Hooker, Darwin mentioned that he hoped to
  • plants you want before going to Nurserymen’ (letter from JD. Hooker, [15 January 1863] ). …
  • avoid[,] of course I must not have from Kew’ (letter to JD. Hooker, 30 January [1863] ). …
  • … ‘I long to stock it, just like a school-boy’ (letter to JDHooker, 15 February [1863] ). On
  • Stove [that is, cool hothouse]’ ( Correspondence  vol12, letter to JD. Hooker, 26[–7] March
  • of different temperatures’ (letter to WC. Tait, 12 and 16 March [1869] ,  Calendar  no. 6661) …
  • 100 yardsto the greenhouses ( Correspondence  vol12, letter to JD. Hooker, [25 January
  • in mid-February (see letter from LC. Treviranus, 12 February 1863 ). The second list is
  • …       Anoectochilus argenteus  12 5 s . …
  • punctatum. 11.  Mormodes aurantiaca 12.  ‘Anoectochilus argenteus 5 s .’ deleted in

Dramatisation script

Summary

Re: Design – Adaptation of the Correspondence of Charles Darwin, Asa Gray and others… by Craig Baxter – as performed 25 March 2007

Matches: 27 hits

  • writings of Asa Gray, Charles Darwin, Joseph Dalton Hooker, Jane Loring Gray Louis Agassiz, Adam
  • this actor uses the words of Jane Loring Gray, Joseph Dalton Hooker, Hugh Falconer, Louis Agassiz, …
  • of natural selection to his friend, the botanist, Joseph D Hooker GRAY:   3   Charles
  • year 1839, and copied and communicated to Messrs Lyell and Hooker in 1844, being a part of
  • DARWIN:   7   January 1844. My dear Hooker. I have beenengaged in a very presumptuous work
  • the opportunity I enjoyed of making your acquaintance at Hookers three years ago; and besides that
  • sheet of note-paper! DARWIN11   My dear HookerWhat a remarkably nice and kind
  • has done my stomach surprising good. GRAY:   12   My dear Mr Darwin, I rejoice in
  • 22   Hurrah I got yesterday my 41st Grass! Hooker is younger than Darwin and Gray by
  • species beforeDARWIN24   My dear Hookeryou cannot imagine how pleased I am
  • on your bowels of immutability. Darwin passes to Hooker a brace of letters 25
  • there is a little rap for you. GRAY:   26   Hooker [is] dreadfully paradoxical to
  • as well as any man. I send itDarwin passes to Hooker an envelope of seeds. …
  • and Hawks have often been seen in mid Atlantic. HOOKER:   28   Thanks for your letter
  • pleased to have. DARWIN33   My dear Hooker. Thanks, also, for [your] Photograph, …
  • expression and so by no means does you justice. HOOKER:   34   I believe I have very
  • beguiled into shouldrileyou, as you say it doesHooker rightly tells me, I have no business to
  • make a very audacious remark in opposition to what I imagine Hooker has been writing and to your own
  • to tell you, that before I had ever corresponded with you, Hooker had shown me several of your
  • … – a Scottish paleobotanist and contemporary of Darwin and HookerspluttersFALCONER: …
  • I can see that you have already corrupted and half-spoiled Hooker!! DARWIN: Now when I see
  • out much fuller in my sketch copied in 1844, and read by Hooker some dozen years ago…. I should be
  • world to come. DARWIN:   56   My dearest Hooker, You will, and so will Mrs Hooker, be
  • HOOKER 10 MAY 1848 5  C DARWIN TO JD HOOKER 12 OCTOBER 1849 6  C DARWIN
  • 11  C DARWIN TO JD HOOKER, 5 JUNE 1855 12  A GRAY TO C DARWIN, 30 JUNE 1855
  • HOOKER, 11 OCTOBER 1858 59 A GRAY TO JD HOOKER, 12 OCTOBER 1857 60 A GRAY TO
  • C DARWIN, 1819 AUGUST 1862 149 C DARWIN TO J. D. HOOKER 26 JULY 1863 150

Darwin in letters,1866: Survival of the fittest

Summary

The year 1866 began well for Charles Darwin, as his health, after several years of illness, was now considerably improved. In February, Darwin received a request from his publisher, John Murray, for a new edition of  Origin. Darwin got the fourth…

Matches: 19 hits

  • on publishers, decried on one occasion by Joseph Dalton Hooker asPenny-wise Pound foolish, …
  • Fuller consideration of Darwins work was given by Hooker in an evening speech on insular floras at
  • me any harmany how I cant be idle’ ( letter to W. D. Fox, 24 August [1866] ). Towards
  • continued to refine his hypothesis in 1866. He wrote to Hooker on 16 May [1866] , ‘Iam at work
  • it was too big. ‘You must congratulate me’, he wrote to Hooker, ‘when you hear that I have sent M.S. …
  • Animals & Cult. Plantsto Printers’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 24 December [1866] ). When
  • of Darwins closest scientific friends and correspondents. Hookers research on alpine floras, Henry
  • have survived and appear in this volume), drawing Darwin, Hooker, and the botanist Charles James Fox
  • bigotted to the last inch, & will not yield’, he wrote to Hooker, who attached greater weight to
  • more than the belief of a dozen physicists’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [28 February 1866] ). Darwin
  • … ‘Your fatherentered at the same time with Dr B. J. who received him with triumph. All his friends
  • me to worship Bence Jones in future—’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 13 May 1866 ). Darwin himself
  • then went for ¾ to Zoolog. Garden!!!!!!!!!’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [28 April 1866] ). …
  • tell him the truth how little exertion I can stand. I sh d  like very much to see him, though I
  • development ( see for example, letter to C. W. Nägeli, 12 June [1866] ). Also in March, however, …
  • original contract between Darwin and the New York publisher D. Appleton and Co. in 1860. …
  • … & admit how little is known on the subject’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 3 and 4 August [1866] ). …
  • see how differently we look at every thing’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 5 August [1866] ). Yet both
  • same thing in a different light from you’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 7 August 1866 ). The two

Darwin in letters, 1878: Movement and sleep

Summary

In 1878, Darwin devoted most of his attention to the movements of plants. He investigated the growth pattern of roots and shoots, studying the function of specific organs in this process. Working closely with his son Francis, Darwin devised a series of…

Matches: 5 hits

  • … is to lessen injury to leaves from radiation’, he wrote to Hooker on 25 March ; ‘this has …
  • … ( letter to Francis Darwin, 17 July [1878] ). On 12 September , Darwin wrote: ‘Bernard is as …
  • … The Swiss botanist Arnold Dodel-Port announced on 12 June 1878 the first issue of an atlas with …
  • … he made a fool of himself at Belfast,’ Darwin wrote to Hooker on 3 or 4 March . ‘I have often …
  • … oddest thing that ever happened to me’, Darwin wrote to Hooker on 14 December. Mindful of the lack …

The Lyell–Lubbock dispute

Summary

In May 1865 a dispute arose between John Lubbock and Charles Lyell when Lubbock, in his book Prehistoric times, accused Lyell of plagiarism. The dispute caused great dismay among many of their mutual scientific friends, some of whom took immediate action…

Matches: 15 hits

  • discussed the book in correspondence with Joseph Dalton Hooker, Asa Gray, and Huxley but he never
  • complaint about the book was more personal. He confided to Hooker that he wasdeeply disappointed’ …
  • but had tried, indirectly, to influence him. He told Hooker: 10 Do see Falconer
  • Falconer to tone down his attack on Lyell and agreed, on Hookers advice, to soften a passage in the
  • speak of their own original researches’. He then added: 12 Very many other parts
  • allude to Sir Cs explanation of the matter’. 23 Hooker, who had also been sent copies of the
  • have given Lyells explanation in print, he disagreed with Hookers assessment of Lubbocks note, …
  • reiterated his admiration for Lubbocks book ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [4 June 1865] ). A week
  • wished to avoid direct involvement in the dispute. When Hooker pressed him for an opinion ( letter
  • of Antiquity of man (C. Lyell 1863c; see letter from J. D. Hooker, [15 June 1865] and n. 13) …
  • 7. See Correspondence vol. 11, letter to J. D. Hooker, 24[–5] February [1863] . On Lyells
  • … ]. 10. Correspondence vol. 11, letter to J. D. Hooker, 17 March [1863] . …
  • wasunintentional’ ([Lubbock] 1863b, p. 214). 12. Letter from Hugh Falconer to John
  • have seen is milk & water’ (see enclosure to letter from J. D. Hooker, [15 June 1865] ). …
  • by a mutual friend of ours’ (letter from John Lubbock to J. D. Hooker, 23 June 1865, in Royal

Darwin in letters, 1847-1850: Microscopes and barnacles

Summary

Darwin's study of barnacles, begun in 1844, took him eight years to complete. The correspondence reveals how his interest in a species found during the Beagle voyage developed into an investigation of the comparative anatomy of other cirripedes and…

Matches: 15 hits

  • Darwin wrote to his friend and confidant Joseph Dalton Hooker: ‘I hope this next summer to finish my
  • my species-work’ ( Correspondence  vol. 3, letter to J. D. Hooker, [5 or 12 November 1845] ). …
  • Of special interest are the nine letters from Joseph Dalton Hooker written during his expedition in
  • and frequently dangerous travels through the mountains. Hooker writes of the complicated geology of
  • of the Sikkim Himalaya. In the midst of all this activity, Hooker responds to Darwins particular
  • other. Geology, and geological controversy Hookers letters illuminate the role of the
  • Herschel, to write the chapter on geology ( letter to J. F. W. Herschel, 4 February [1848] ). …
  • a young Balanus in this illformed little monster? Fig 12.— . . . It is manifest this curious little
  • that such a monograph was adesideratum’ ( letter to J. L. R. Agassiz, 22 October 1848 ), was
  • are clearly expressed in his letters; he also pointed out to Hooker that it was his species theory
  • of the sexes from an ancestral hermaphrodite in his Notebook D ( Notebooks ) and had subsequently
  • or pistils ( Correspondence  vol. 2, letter from J. S. Henslow, 21 November 1840 ). The sexual
  • this importance comes through in his happy protestations to Hooker: ‘But I can hardly explain what I
  • you say, my species theory is all gospel.—’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 10 May 1848 ). Once
  • to H. E. Strickland, 29 January [1849] . As Darwin wrote to J. D. Hooker, who had warned him

Darwin in letters, 1856-1857: the 'Big Book'

Summary

In May 1856, Darwin began writing up his 'species sketch’ in earnest. During this period, his working life was completely dominated by the preparation of his 'Big Book', which was to be called Natural selection. Using letters are the main…

Matches: 14 hits

  • in his immediate circle were Charles Lyell and Joseph Dalton Hooker, who were joined in 1856 by
  • selection might work in nature ( letter from Charles Lyell, 1–2 May 1856, n. 10 ). He was
  • way before. ‘How very odd it is that no zoologist sh  d . ever have thought it worth while to look
  • to make my Book as perfect as ever I can.’ ( letter to W. D. Fox, 8 February [1857] ). …
  • than their lowland relatives. But a last-minute check with Hooker revealed that Darwin was mistaken: …
  • pretty effectuallycomplained Darwin in 1857 ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [2 May 1857] ). …
  • calculations and different ways of working, in letters to Hooker, Gray, and Watson. The results
  • an equally difficult problem that he took in turn to Watson, Hooker, George Bentham, and the Belfast
  • show a separation of the sexes, a proposal that Asa Gray and Hooker confirmed during the course of
  • zoological gardens in London. As he cheerfully explained to Hooker: ‘I must tell you another of my  …
  • bird had naturally eaten have grown well.’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 10 December [1856] ). …
  • first made in a letter written by Lyell from London on 1–2 May 1856. Darwin took the suggestion
  • … [1856] ). It was after this meeting that Darwin wrote to Hooker to say that Lyell had pressed him
  • whole Lamarckian doctrine.’ ( letter from Charles Lyell, 1–2 May 1856, n. 7 ). The excitement and

Scientific Networks

Summary

Friendship|Mentors|Class|Gender In its broadest sense, a scientific network is a set of connections between people, places, and things that channel the communication of knowledge, and that substantially determine both its intellectual form and content,…

Matches: 9 hits

  • tapping into the networks of others, such as Joseph Dalton Hooker and Asa Gray, who were at leading
  • of face-to-face contact. His correspondence with Joseph Hooker and Asa Gray illustrates how close
  • The first is between Darwin and his friend Kew botanist J. D. Hooker. The second is between Darwin
  • to conclusion that species are not immutable. He admits to Hookerit is like confessing a murder”. …
  • Letter 1202Darwin, C. R. to Hooker, J. D., 6 Oct [1848] Darwin catches up on personal
  • name to specific name. Letter 1220Hooker, J. D. to Darwin, C. R., 3 Feb 1849 In
  • Letter 1260Darwin, C. R. to Hooker, J. D., 12 Oct 1849 Darwin opens by discussing their
  • lamination of gneiss. Letter 1319Hooker, J. D. to Darwin, C. R., 6 & 7 Apr 1850
  • Letter 3805Darwin, C. R. to Scott, John, 12 Nov [1862] Darwin thanks Scott for bringing

Darwin in letters, 1868: Studying sex

Summary

The quantity of Darwin’s correspondence increased dramatically in 1868 due largely to his ever-widening research on human evolution and sexual selection.Darwin’s theory of sexual selection as applied to human descent led him to investigate aspects of the…

Matches: 20 hits

  • means of changing the races of man’ (Correspondence vol. 12, letter to A. R. Wallace, 28 [May 1864
  • the accursed Index-maker’, Darwin wrote to Joseph Dalton Hooker on 6 January . Darwin had sent
  • … ). Darwin sympathised, replying on 14 January , ‘I sh d  have a very bad heart, as hard as
  • to read a few pages feel fairly nauseated’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 3 February [1868] ). But such
  • awaythat sparked the most discussion. Darwin wrote to Hooker on 23 February , ‘did you look at
  • thought it was by Gray himself, but Darwin corrected him: ‘D r  Gray would strike me in the face, …
  • editor of the  London and Westminster Review . When Hooker later tried to refute the claims of the
  • a scamp & I begin to think a veritable ass’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 1 September [1868] ). …
  • on 17 April 1868 . The letter was addressed tothe Rev d  C. Darwin M.d’; Binstead evidently
  • … (from ?, 6 April 1868). On 21 May , Darwin complained to Hooker, ‘I am bothered with heaps of
  • kind almost heroic, in you to sacrifice your hair and pay 3 d  in the cause of science
  • information on colour changes in the canary (letters from J. J. Weir, [26] March 1868 and 3
  • … , ‘almost heroic, in you to sacrifice your hair and pay 3 d  in the cause of science.’ Darwin
  • added, ‘for it is clear that I have none’ ( letter to J. J. Weir, 30 May [1868] ). Sexual
  • role of colour, sound, and smell in attracting females. J. J. Weir reported on 14 April 1868
  • Wallace that he had begun the previous year, writing to Hooker on 21 May , ‘I always distrust
  • circulated to remote parts of the world. A correspondent of Hookers distributed it in Japan ( …
  • the Linnean Society of London on 19 March. In a letter to Hooker on 21 May , he enthused over an
  • the previous year by James Philip Mansel Weale ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [20 May 1868] ). …
  • defender in England, Thomas Henry Huxley, remarked on 12 September onthe terribleDarwinismus

All Darwin's letters from 1873 go online for the anniversary of Origin

Summary

To celebrate the 158th anniversary of the publication of Origin of species on 24 November, the full transcripts and footnotes of over 500 letters from and to Charles Darwin in 1873 are now available online. Read about Darwin's life in 1873 through his…

Matches: 2 hits

  • proving a true act of digestion in Drosera.  ( Letter to JDHooker, 23 October [1873] ) …
  • now been printed off, & most of them sold!  ( Letter to JDHooker, 12 January [1873] ) …

Darwin in letters, 1872: Job done?

Summary

'My career’, Darwin wrote towards the end of 1872, 'is so nearly closed. . .  What little more I can do, shall be chiefly new work’, and the tenor of his correspondence throughout the year is one of wistful reminiscence, coupled with a keen eye…

Matches: 20 hits

  • Darwins best efforts, set the final price at 7 s.  6 d.  ( letter from RFCooke, 12
  • as I can make it’, he wrote to the translator ( letter to JJMoulinié, 23 September 1872 ). He
  • anatomist St George Jackson Mivart ( letter to St GJMivart,  11 January [1872] ). A
  • am made to appear’, complained Darwin ( letter to St GJMivart, 5 January 1872 ). Piqued, …
  • … `fundamental intellectual errors’ ( letter from St GJMivart, 6 January 1872 ). Darwin
  • to think he felt friendly towards me’ ( letter to St GJMivart, 8 January [1872] ).  Despite
  • if only `in another world’ ( letter from St GJMivart,  10 January 1872 ).  Darwin, determined
  • …  but asked Mivart not to acknowledge it ( letter to St GJMivart, 11 January [1872] ). 'I
  • selection is somewhat under a cloud’, he wrote to JETaylor on 13 January , and he complained
  • rather than offended by `that clever book’ ( letter to JMHerbert, 21 November 1872 ) and
  • dispute involving his close friend Joseph Dalton Hooker came to a headHooker, director of the
  • system in the glasshouses had escalated to the point where Hooker applied over Ayrtons head direct
  • your enemies be cursed, is my pious frame of mind Hookers cause was taken up by his
  • the independence of science from bureaucratic interference. Hooker had kept Darwin well informed: …
  • was Darwins wholeheartedly partisan reply ( letter to JDHooker, 14 May 1872 ). On 13 June, a
  • to make one turn into an old honest Tory’ ( letter to JDHooker, 12 July [1872] ). …
  • own muscles when attending women in labour ( letter from JTRothrock, 25 November 1872 ); …
  • of the microscope led his head to `fail’ ( letter to WDFox, 29 October [1872] ) he had begun
  • by hearing about Panagæus!’ Darwin