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List of correspondents

Summary

Below is a list of Darwin's correspondents with the number of letters for each one. Click on a name to see the letters Darwin exchanged with that correspondent.    "A child of God" (1) Abberley,…

Matches: 12 hits

  • … Below is a list of Darwin's correspondents with the number of letters for each one. …
  • … James (1) Anderson, James (c) (3) …
  • … Vienna (1) Appleton, C. E. C. B. (2) …
  • … Athenæum (11) Atkin, J. R. (1) …
  • … Austin, A. D. (2) Austin, C. F. (1) …
  • … Baker, A. F. (1) Bakewell, R. H. (1) …
  • … K. S. (1) Barr, J. G. R. (1) …
  • … Edward (6) Bartlett, R. S. (1) …
  • … (1) Berliner Gesellschaft für Anthropologie, Ethnologie und Urgeschichte …
  • … Blackwell, T. E. (1) Blair, R. A. (7) …
  • … Dareste, Camille (9) Darwin family (1) …
  • … Linnean Society (1) Unidentified (204) …

Darwin in letters, 1868: Studying sex

Summary

The quantity of Darwin’s correspondence increased dramatically in 1868 due largely to his ever-widening research on human evolution and sexual selection.Darwin’s theory of sexual selection as applied to human descent led him to investigate aspects of the…

Matches: 22 hits

  • …   On 6 March 1868, Darwin wrote to the entomologist and accountant John Jenner Weir, ‘If
  • he ought to do what I am doing pester them with letters.’ Darwin was certainly true to his word. The
  • and sexual selection. In  Origin , pp. 8790, Darwin had briefly introduced the concept of
  • the mating process. In a letter to Alfred Russel Wallace in 1864, Darwin claimed that sexual
  • to the stridulation of crickets. At the same time, Darwin continued to collect material on
  • and his immediate circle of friends and relations. In July 1868 Darwin was still anticipating that
  • which was devoted to sexual selection in the animal kingdom. Darwin described his thirst for
  • a little and not too much’ ( letter to Albert Günther, 15 May [1868] ). My book is
  • in January 1868. A final delay caused by the indexing gave Darwin much vexation. ‘My book is
  • Murray to intervene, complaining on 9 January , ‘M r . Dallasdelayis intolerableI am
  • it was by Gray himself, but Darwin corrected him: ‘D r  Gray would strike me in the face, but not
  • … . It is a disgrace to the paper’ ( letter from A. R. Wallace, 24 February [1868] ). The review was
  • April 1868 . The letter was addressed tothe Rev d  C. Darwin M.d’; Binstead evidently assumed
  • that had been discovered in a thornbush in Cumberland. An unidentified correspondent offered facts
  • I did not see this, or rather I saw it only obs[c]urely, & have kept only a few references.’ …
  • as life he wd find the odour sexual!’ ( letter to A . R. Wallace, 16 September [1868] ). Francis
  • south of France to Sarah Elizabeth Wedgwood on 9 Novembe r, describing sphinx moths that were
  • question of theOrigin of Species”’ ( letter from A. R. Wallace, 4 October 1868 ). …
  • hands of the enemies of Nat. Selection’ ( letter from A. R. Wallace, 8 [April] 1868 ). …
  • mission stations in Victoria, Australia ( letter from R. B. Smyth, 13 August 1868 ); lengthy
  • of her two-month old daughter Katherine ( letter from C. M. Hawkshaw to Emma Darwin, 9 February
  • rest mostly on faith, and on accumulation of adaptations, &c) … Of course I understand your

Books on the Beagle

Summary

The Beagle was a sort of floating library.  Find out what Darwin and his shipmates read here.

Matches: 18 hits

  • So wrote Captain FitzRoy in the  Narrative  (2: 18). CD, in his letter to Henslow, 9 [September
  • for Books.’ (Letter from Robert FitzRoy, 23 September 1831 ). On board, FitzRoy states, ‘Our
  • the working space with CD. According to Keith Thompson (1975), the cabin measured 10 feet by 11 feet
  • letter FitzRoy wrote to his sister during an earlier voyage (16 March 1826): ‘I flatter myself I
  • from the unpublished zoological and geological notes in the Darwin Archive (DAR 2938), a brief
  • two references to Felix Azaras works in notes made during 1833 cite secondary sources (DAR 33: 254
  • is of four kinds: There are volumes now in the Darwin Library in Cambridge that contain
  • notes made by CD during the voyage. They are in the Darwin Archive in the Cambridge University
  • and symbols are used: DAR  —  Darwin Archive CUL  —  Cambridge University
  • … , conveys the following information: CDs copy, now in Darwin LibaryCUL, was used on board. The
  • 1 of volume 32 of CDs geological diary (DAR 32.1) in the Darwin Archive. The copy in the Darwin
  • … . 2 vols. Strasbourg, 1819. (Inscription in vol. 1: ‘C. Darwin HMS Beagle’; DAR 32.1: 61). Darwin
  • 26, 27, 28 . London, 1831. (DAR 31.1: 276v.; 33: 253v.). Darwin LibraryCUL, 1832 Philadelphia
  • LibraryDown. Cook, JamesVoyages  (editions unidentified; see also Hawkesworth, John). …
  • 1831. (DAR 32.1: 53). Desaulses de Freycinet, L. Csee  Freycinet, L. C. Desaulses de
  • la corvette . . .La Coquille 18225. Zoologie  par MM. [R. P.] Lesson et [P.] Garnot. 2 vols., …
  • … (Inscriptions: vol. 1 (1830), ‘Given me by Capt. F.R C. Darwin’; vol.2 (1832), ‘Charles Darwin M: …
  • concerning a future state . . . by a country pastor [R. W.].  London, 1829. (Letter from Caroline

Darwin’s observations on his children

Summary

Charles Darwin’s observations on the development of his children, began the research that culminated in his book The Expression of the emotions in man and animals, published in 1872, and his article ‘A biographical sketch of an infant’, published in Mind…

Matches: 16 hits

  • Charles Darwins observations on the development of his children,[1began the research that
  • races, lunatics, the blind, and animals. And as early as 1839 Darwin had begun to collect
  • the expression of emotions. As the following transcript of Darwins notes reveals, he closely
  • William Erasmus, the stages of his development suggesting to Darwin those expressions which are
  • The tone of the manuscript reflects an aspect of Darwins character clearly perceived by Emma during
  • … “What does that prove”.’[6For in these notes, Darwins deep scientific curiosity transcends his
  • that on occasion he refers to William asit’. Darwin possessed the ability to dissociate
  • memories.[8Yet, though the dissociation was essential for Darwins scientific goal, the notes here
  • However, at this point the record breaks off until January 1852, by which time the Darwin family had
  • of muscles, without a corresponding sensation. D r . Holland[12informs me children do not
  • trowsers. Emma one morning put on an unconspicuous bonnet of C. Langton,[52W. instantly observed
  • she added an s to the end of every wordEttis & Bettis &c afterwards all the ws were turned
  • goed dawn to the willage”. Fish for Smith. Kaw for cow. &c. Lenny[612 years old speaks
  • any thing with my egg. Miss Th. Shall I cut up y r  meat? L. I dont care whether you do or
  • … “But I could not help it”— I saidLenny you c d  help it, dont say that”. “I could not help it a
  • in Emma Darwins hand. [81This sentence is in an unidentified childs hand. …