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Darwin in letters, 1837–1843: The London years to 'natural selection'

Summary

The seven-year period following Darwin's return to England from the Beagle voyage was one of extraordinary activity and productivity in which he became recognised as a naturalist of outstanding ability, as an author and editor, and as a professional…

Matches: 24 hits

  • The seven-year period following Darwin's return to England from the Beagle  voyage was one
  • a family Busy as he was with scientific activities, Darwin found time to re-establish family
  • close contact. In November 1838, two years after his return, Darwin became engaged to his cousin, …
  • they show for one anothers sensibilities. Early in 1839 the couple set up house in London and at
  • daughter, Anne Elizabeth, moved to Down House in Kent, where Darwin was to spend the rest of his
  • his greatest theoretical achievement, the most important of Darwins activities during the years
  • ideas on a wide range of topics. Then, in September 1838, T. R. Malthus’  An essay on the principle
  • and set in type by November 1837, though not published until 1839, when it appeared as the third
  • by all the leading geologists of Englandamong them Charles Lyell, Sedgwick, and Buckland (see the
  • Fossil Mammalia , by Richard OwenMammalia , by G. R. WaterhouseBirds , by John Gould;  …
  • publications. The beetles were described by F. W. Hope, G. R. Waterhouse, and C. C. Babington; the
  • lists of Darwins plants (see D. M. Porter 1981). Charles Lyell In the extensive
  • correspondent, both scientifically and personally, was Charles Lyell. The letters Darwin and Lyell
  • letters have suffered an even more severe loss. In a letter to Lyells sister-in-law, Katharine
  • material for her  Life, letters and journals of Sir Charles Lyell, Bart.,  Darwin informs her that
  • of fact . . . on the origin & variation of species” ( Letter to J. S. Henslow, [November 1839] …
  • that he had a sound solution to what J. F. W. Herschel in a letter to Lyell had called themystery
  • about searching for evidence to support his hypothesis. In a letter to Lyell, [14] September [1838
  • all crosses between all domestic birds & animals dogs, cats &c &c very valuable—' …
  • the practice of systematists. As the correspondence with G. R. Waterhouse during the 1840s shows, …
  • just the same, though I know what I am looking for' ( Letter to G. R. Waterhouse, [26 July
  • Marriage Darwin married Emma Wedgwood in January 1839. His hopes and fears about married life
  • to act’ ( Letter from Emma Darwin, [  c.  February 1839] ). These are not matters that she would
  • In 1840 the illness was different. As he wrote to Charles Lyell, [19 February 1840] , “it is now