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List of correspondents

Summary

Below is a list of Darwin's correspondents with the number of letters for each one. Click on a name to see the letters Darwin exchanged with that correspondent.    "A child of God" (1) Abberley,…

Matches: 7 hits

  • … Below is a list of Darwin's correspondents with the number of letters for each one. …
  • … (1) Allen, Thomas (2) Allman, G. J. …
  • … Vienna (1) Appleton, C. E. C. B. (2) …
  • … Austin, A. D. (2) Austin, C. F. (1) …
  • … Batalin, A. F. (2) Bate, C. S. (21) …
  • … (1) Berliner Gesellschaft für Anthropologie, Ethnologie und Urgeschichte …
  • … Dareste, Camille (9) Darwin family (1) …

Darwin in letters, 1879: Tracing roots

Summary

Darwin spent a considerable part of 1879 in the eighteenth century. His journey back in time started when he decided to publish a biographical account of his grandfather Erasmus Darwin to accompany a translation of an essay on Erasmus’s evolutionary ideas…

Matches: 21 hits

  • There are summaries of all Darwin's letters from the year 1879 on this website.  The full texts
  • to publish a biographical account of his grandfather Erasmus Darwin to accompany a translation of an
  • the sensitivity of the tips. Despite this breakthrough, when Darwin first mentioned the book to his
  • a holiday in the Lake District in August did little to raise Darwins spirits. ‘I wish that my
  • his departure ( letter to W. T. Thiselton-Dyer, [after 26] July [1879] ). From July, Darwin had an
  • old agea dismal time’ ( letter to Henry Johnson, 24 September 1879 ). He may have been consoled
  • all over like a baked pear’ ( enclosure in letter from R. W. Dixon, 20 December 1879 ). The year
  • has become of the Gulph Stream?’ Anthony Rich inquired on 28 December, ‘Has it lost itself, or gone
  • his wife sent birthday greetings and a photograph of their 2-year-old son named Darwin, who, they
  • nice and good as could be’ ( letter from Karl Beger, [ c. 12 February 1879] ). The masters of
  • materialism”’ ( letter from Francis Darwin, [after 2 June 1879 ]). As one of Darwins most ardent
  • of all kinds’, he confessed to Thiselton-Dyer on 21 February , adding that the only thing worse
  • of the Admiralty described the unknown young man asA M r Darwin grandson of the well known
  • other than Darwins sister Caroline (who was around 2 years old at the time of Erasmuss death). …
  • … & the where, & the who—’ ( letter from V. H. Darwin, 28 May [1879] ). On the Galton side
  • him on 9 June not toexpend much powder & shot on M r  Butler’, for he really was not worth
  • leaving Darwinmore perplexed than ever about life of D r . D’ ( letter to Francis Darwin, 12
  • the highest point, for hiswhy”—“what for” &c are incessant’, Darwin joked on 2 July (first
  • which is his profession thonot a profitable one; also D r  C[lark]’s opinion that he was so
  • greatly amused Darwin, who felt it wasvery acute of M r  Ruskin to know that I feel a deep & …
  • and preventCattle diseases, Potato diseases &c’, probably did not know that Darwin had already

Dramatisation script

Summary

Re: Design – Adaptation of the Correspondence of Charles Darwin, Asa Gray and others… by Craig Baxter – as performed 25 March 2007

Matches: 21 hits

  • Re: Designperformance version25 March 20071 Re: DesignAdaptation of the
  • as the creator of this dramatisation, and that of the Darwin Correspondence Project to be identified
  • correspondence or published writings of Asa Gray, Charles Darwin, Joseph Dalton Hooker, Jane Loring
  • of the following: Actor 1Asa Gray Actor 2Charles Darwin Actor 3In the
  • Agassiz, Adam Sedgwick, A Friend of John Stuart Mill, Emma Darwin, Horace Darwinand acts as a sort
  • the play unfolds and acting as a go-between between Gray and Darwin, and between the audience and
  • this, he sends out copies of his Review of the Life of Darwin. At this time in his life, Asa
  • away, and he wrote that evening. GRAY:   2   [Since atheistic doctrines of evolution] …
  • friends in England, copies of hisReview of the Life of Darwin’… pencilling the address so that it
  • Joseph D Hooker GRAY:   3   Charles Darwinmade his home on the border of the little
  • are kept in check by a constitutional weakness. DARWIN: A plain but comfortable brick
  • He opens the letter. DARWIN8   April 25 th 1855. My dear [Dr Gray]. I hope
  • andArct. Asia’… GRAY:   9   May 22 nd 1855. Harvard University. My Dear Sir, I
  • a joke at the expense of Agassiz. DARWIN:   20   Lyell told me, that Agassiz, …
  • Ergo, theorisers are always right. GRAY:   21   Your anecdoteis most
  • up that he cannot explain awayDARWIN22   Hurrah I got yesterday my 41st Grass! …
  • he is a professional botanist HOOKER:   23   Dear Darwin, I have finished the
  • so shaky about species beforeDARWIN24   My dear Hookeryou cannot imagine how
  • Darwin passes to Hooker a brace of letters 25   I send enclosed [a letter for you
  • paragraph, in which I quote and differ from you[r178   doctrine that each variation has been
  • ARTS AND SCIENCES, PROCEEDINGS XVII, 1882 4  C DARWIN TO JD HOOKER 10 MAY 1848

Darwin’s reading notebooks

Summary

In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he wished to read in Notebook C (Notebooks, pp. 319–28). In 1839, these lists were copied and continued in separate notebooks. The first of these reading notebooks (DAR 119…

Matches: 24 hits

  • In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he wished to
  • … (DAR 119) opens with five pages of text copied from Notebook C and carries on through 1851; the
  • used these notebooks extensively in dating and annotating Darwins letters; the full transcript
  • … *128). For clarity, the transcript does not record Darwins alterations. The spelling and
  • book had been consulted. Those cases where it appears that Darwin made a genuine deletion have been
  • a few instances, primarily in theBooks Readsections, Darwin recorded that a work had been
  • of the books listed in the other two notebooks. Sometimes Darwin recorded that an abstract of the
  • own. Soon after beginning his first reading notebook, Darwin began to separate the scientific
  • the second reading notebook. Readers primarily interested in Darwins scientific reading, therefore, …
  • to be Read [DAR *119: Inside Front Cover] C. Darwin June 1 st . 1838
  • de lHomme,” by Dr. Pierquin, published in Paris (in 2 vols.), so long ago as 1839 4   …
  • view at Teneriffe. in Pers. Narr. [A. von Humboldt 181429] D r  Royle on Himmalaya types
  • influence of climate [W. Falconer 1781] [DAR *119: 2v.] Whites regular gradation
  • aux terres australes [Péron 1824]— Chap. 39. tom. 4. p. 273. Latreille Geographie des
  • in brutes Blackwood June 1838 [J. F. Ferrie 1838]. H. C. Watson on Geog. distrib: of Brit: …
  • Wiegman has pub. German pamphlet on crossing oats &c [Wiegmann 1828] Horticultural
  • in Library of Hort. Soc. [DAR *119:5v.] M c .Neil 16  has written good article
  • … [Fries 1825] Clarkes Travels [Clarke 181023]. at most Index.—see infra Temminck Hist. …
  • 1816]— quoted by D r . Holland [Holland 1839] (p. 27) as goodDecandoelle has chapter on
  • … [Fellows 1839] Catherine 48 Life of Collins R.A. [Collins 1848] Phases of Faith
  • 1848Memoirs of the life of William   Collins, Esq., R.A.  2 vols. London.  *119: 23; 119: …
  • by Richard Owen.  Vol. 4 of  The works of John Hunter, F.R.S. with notes . Edited by James F. …
  • Robert. 1843Memoirs of the life of John   Constable, R.A., composed chiefly of his letters. …
  • Peacock, George. 1855Life of Thomas Young, M.D., F.R.S.  London.  *128: 172; 128: 21

Fake Darwin: myths and misconceptions

Summary

Many myths have persisted about Darwin's life and work. Here are a few of the more pervasive ones, with full debunking below...

Matches: 1 hits

  • … Many myths have persisted about Darwin's life and work. Here are a few of the more pervasive …

Language: key letters

Summary

How and why language evolved bears on larger questions about the evolution of the human species, and the relationship between man and animals. Darwin presented his views on the development of human speech from animal sounds in The Descent of Man (1871),…

Matches: 13 hits

  • human species, and the relationship between man and animals. Darwin presented his views on the
  • he first began to reflect on the transmutation of species. Darwins correspondence reveals the scope
  • he exchanged information and ideas. Letter 346Darwin, C. R. to Darwin, C. S., 27 Feb 1837
  • languages separated from one stock.” Letter 2070Wedgwood, Hensleigh to Darwin, C. R., …
  • because we can trace the elements into Latin, German &c. but I see much the same sort of thing
  • down of former continents.” Letter 3054Darwin, C. R. to Lyell, Charles, 2 Feb [1861] …
  • that languages, like species, were separately created. Darwin writes to the geologist Charles Lyell
  • him is perfectly logical.” Letter 5605Darwin, C. R. to Müller, J. F. T., 15 Aug [1867] …
  • Letter 7040Wedgwood, Hensleigh to Darwin, C. R., [1868-70?] As Darwin began to work on
  • growing to such a stageLetter 8367Darwin, C. R. to Wright, Chauncey, 3 June [1872] …
  • altering the breed. Letter 8962Darwin, C. R. to Max Müller, Friedrich, 3 July 1873
  • Letter 10194Max Müller, Friedrich to Darwin, C. R., 13 Oct [1875] For Müller, human and
  • … […]” Letter 9887Dawkins, W. B. to Darwin, C. R., 14 Mar 1875 The relationship

Darwin in letters, 1865: Delays and disappointments

Summary

The year was marked by three deaths of personal significance to Darwin: Hugh Falconer, a friend and supporter; Robert FitzRoy, captain of the Beagle; and William Jackson Hooker, director of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, and father of Darwin’s friend…

Matches: 24 hits

  • In 1865, the chief work on Charles Darwins mind was the writing of  The variation of animals and
  • letters on climbing plants to make another paper. Darwin also submitted a manuscript of his
  • protégé, John Scott, who was now working in India. Darwins transmutation theory continued to
  • Argyll, appeared in the religious weeklyGood Words . Darwin received news of an exchange of
  • Butler, and, according to Butler, the bishop of Wellington. Darwins theory was discussed at an
  • in the  GardenersChronicleAt the end of the year, Darwin was elected an honorary member of
  • year was marked by three deaths of personal significance to Darwin: Hugh Falconer, a friend of
  • in August. There was also a serious dispute between two of Darwins friends, John Lubbock and
  • to me. So the world goes.—’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 2 February [1865] ). However, Hooker, at the
  • for his enjoyment of life. He wrote to Charles Lyell on 22 January [1865] , ‘unfortunately
  • about an hour on most days’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 22 December [1865] ). Delays and
  • idle when I can do anything’ ( letter to John Murray, 2 June [1865] ). It was not until 25
  • abstract of the paper was read before the Linnean Society on 2 February, and in April Darwin wrote
  • Darwin had received a copy of Müllers bookFür Darwin , a study of the Crustacea with reference
  • 1864 ( Correspondence vol. 12, letter to Ernst Haeckel, 21 November [1864] ). Since it was, …
  • he did not clearly understand (l etter to Daniel Oliver, 20 October [1865] ). Darwin was
  • to do any scientific work’ ( letter to Fritz Müller, 20 September [1865] ), he clearly read Müller
  • … ( Correspondence vol. 9, letter to J. D. Hooker, 28 September [1861] ). Scott had
  • … (see Correspondence  vol. 11, letter from John Scott, 21 September [1863] ), and wrote up his
  • suffering from sea-sickness ( letter from John Scott, 21 July 1865 ). This may have been unwise: …
  • … … inheritance, reversion, effects of use & disuse &c’, and which he intended to publish in
  • He wrote to Hooker, ‘I doubt whether you or I or any one c d  do any good in healing this breach. …
  • Hookers behalf, ‘He asks if you saw the article of M r . Croll in the last Reader on the
  • … ‘As for your thinking that you do not deserve the C[opley] Medal,’ he rebuked Hooker, ‘that I

Darwin in letters, 1878: Movement and sleep

Summary

In 1878, Darwin devoted most of his attention to the movements of plants. He investigated the growth pattern of roots and shoots, studying the function of specific organs in this process. Working closely with his son Francis, Darwin devised a series of…

Matches: 19 hits

  • … lessen injury to leaves from radiation In 1878, Darwin devoted most of his attention to …
  • … in this process. Working closely with his son Francis, Darwin devised a series of experiments to …
  • … plant laboratories in Europe. While Francis was away, Darwin delighted in his role as …
  • … from botanical research was provided by potatoes, as Darwin took up the cause of an Irish …
  • … would rid Ireland of famine. Several correspondents pressed Darwin for his views on religion, …
  • … closed with remarkable news of a large legacy bequeathed to Darwin by a stranger as a reward for his …
  • … birthday ( letter to Ernst Haeckel, 12 February [1878] ), Darwin reflected that it was ‘more …
  • … Expression ), and the final revision of Origin (1872), Darwin had turned almost exclusively to …
  • … Movement in plants In the spring of 1878, Darwin started to focus on the first shoots and …
  • … were enrolled as researchers, as were family members. Darwin asked his niece Sophy to observe …
  • … all seedlings come up arched’ ( letter to Sophy Wedgwood, 24 March [1878–80] ). While Darwin was …
  • … on one side, then another, to produce movement in the stalk. Darwin compared adult and young leaves …
  • … in plants , pp. 112–13). He explained to Francis on 2 July : ‘I go on maundering about the …
  • … after growth has ceased or nearly ceased.’ Finally, Darwin turned to plant motion below the …
  • … precision the lines of least resistance in the ground.’ Darwin would devote a whole chapter to the …
  • … tomorrow to Wurzburg,’ Darwin wrote to Thiselton-Dyer on 2 June , ‘& work by myself will be …
  • … [before 17 July 1878] ), ‘a strong horizontal axis about 2 feet long which goes round by clockwork …
  • … Wiesner on the causes of plant movement, Darwin wrote on 25 July, ‘I am sorry Sachs is so severe …
  • … animal instinct and intelligence. ‘Frank’s son, nearly 2 years old (& we think much of his …

Dates of composition of Darwin's manuscript on species

Summary

Many of the dates of letters in 1856 and 1857 were based on or confirmed by reference to Darwin’s manuscript on species (DAR 8--15.1, inclusive; transcribed and published as Natural selection). This manuscript, begun in May 1856, was nearly completed by…

Matches: 9 hits

  • in 1856 and 1857 were based on or confirmed by reference to Darwins manuscript on species (DAR 8- …
  • May 1856, was nearly completed by June 1858. At that point Darwin wasinterrupted’, as he put it, …
  • transmutation ( letter to Charles Lyell, 18 [June 1858] ). Darwin recorded in hisJournalthe
  • in theJournaland the chapter headings as supplied by Darwin, followed by the reference of the
  • also given. Chapter 1 is not extant nor was it recorded in Darwin'sJournal’. Chapter 2 is not
  • … [1] (not extant) 2 13 October 1856
  • 4 26 January 1857 Variation under nature (DAR 9; …
  • natural selection (DAR 10.1; Natural selection , pp. 173--212) …
  • chapter has been taken from a table of contents to which Darwin added the names of chapters as he

Women’s scientific participation

Summary

Observers | Fieldwork | Experimentation | Editors and critics | Assistants Darwin’s correspondence helps bring to light a community of women who participated, often actively and routinely, in the nineteenth-century scientific community. Here is a…

Matches: 21 hits

  • … |  Editors and critics  |  Assistants Darwins correspondence helps bring to light a
  • community. Here is a selection of letters exchanged between Darwin and his workforce of women
  • Women: Letter 1194 - Darwin to Whitby, M. A. T., [12 August 1849] Darwin
  • peculiarities in inheritance. Letter 3787 - Darwin, H. E. to Darwin, [29 October
  • in her garden. Letter 4523 - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, [6 June 1864] …
  • Egypt. Letter 7223 - Darwin to Wedgwood, L. C., [8 June 1867 - 72] Darwin
  • Henrietta. Letter 7179 - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, [5 May 1870] …
  • cats. Letter 8989 - Treat, M. to Darwin, [28 July 1873] Mary Treat reports
  • 9426 - Story-Maskelyne , T. M. to Darwin, [23 April 1874] Thereza Story-Maskelyne
  • father of plants and insects. Men: Letter 2221 - Blyth, E. to Darwin, [22
  • Letter 4436 - Darwin to Hooker, J. D., [26-27 March 1864] Darwin thanks Hooker for
  • the wallpaper. Letter 5756 - Langton, E. & C. to Wedgwood S. E., [after 9
  • Letter 1701 - Morris, M. H. to Prior, R. C. A., [17 June 1855] Margaretta Hare Morris
  • in Llandudno. Letter 4823  - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, H. E., [May 1865] …
  • Letter 8144 - Darwin to Wedgwood, L. C., [5 January 1872] Darwin asks his niece, …
  • Lychnis diurna. Letter 8168 - Ruck, A. R . to Darwin, H., [20 January 1872] …
  • lawn. Letter 8224 - Darwin to Ruck, A. R., [24 February 1872] Darwin
  • Letter 9606 - Harrison, L. C. to Darwin, [22 August 1874] Darwins niece, Lucy, …
  • Letter 1701  - Morris, M. H. to Prior, R. C. A., [17 June 1855] Margaretta Hare Morris
  • garden ”. Letter 6083  - Casparay, J. X. R. to Darwin, [2 April 1868] …
  • Letter 7858 - Darwin to Wa llace, A. R., [12 July 1871] Darwin tells Wallace that

Darwin in letters, 1880: Sensitivity and worms

Summary

There are summaries of all Darwin's letters from the year 1880 on this website.  The full texts of the letters are not yet available online but are in volume 28 of the print edition of The correspondence of Charles Darwin, published by Cambridge…

Matches: 23 hits

  • There are summaries of all Darwin's letters from the year 1880 on this website.  The full texts
  • to adapt to varying conditions. The implications of Darwins work for the boundary between animals
  • studies of animal instincts by George John Romanes drew upon Darwins early observations of infants, …
  • of evolution and creation. Many letters flowed between Darwin and his children, as he took delight
  • Financial support for science was a recurring issue, as Darwin tried to secure a Civil List pension
  • with Samuel Butler, prompted by the publication of Erasmus Darwin the previous year. …
  • character is of much value to me’ ( letter to C. H. Tindal, 5 January 1880 ). Darwin had employed
  • Darwins Life . ‘In an endeavour to explain away y r . treatment of [William Alvey Darwin],’ …
  • … ( letter from W. E. Darwin to Charles and Emma Darwin, 22 July 1880 ).                 …
  • toexpend much powder & shot’ ( Correspondence vol. 27, letter from Ernst Krause, 7 June
  • old and new was published). Butler wrote to Darwin on 2 January 1880 for an explanation: …
  • by anticipation the position I have taken as regards D r Erasmus Darwin in my book Evolution old
  • to hang an article upon’ ( letter from W. E. Darwin, [28 January 1880] ).                 …
  • matter before the public’ ( letter from Samuel Butler, 21 January 1880 ). He stated his case in
  • to the end’, added her husband Richard ( letter from R. B. Litchfield, 1 February 1880 ). Even the
  • an article and textbook (A. Gray 1877 and A. Gray 1879, pp. 201). ‘I think you cannot have watched
  • me is to hide the enlarged root, at least at first, beneath 2½ inches of soil as a protection
  • to his publishers business partner Robert Cooke on 23 April , ‘My family shake their heads in
  • for Author or publisher?’ ( letter from R. F. Cooke, 20 July 1880 ). ‘I must take the risk & …
  • in a book about beetles the impressive wordscaptured by C. Darwin”. … This seemed to me glory
  • … ‘but the subject has amused me’ ( letter to W. C. McIntosh, 18 June 1880 ). Members of the family
  • great doctrines …“Come of Age”‘ ( letter from W. C. Williamson to Emma Darwin, 2 September 1880 ). …
  • his voice as clearly as if he were present’ (letters to C. W. Fox, 29 March 1880 and 10 [April

Darwin in letters, 1874: A turbulent year

Summary

The year 1874 was one of consolidation, reflection, and turmoil for Darwin. He spent the early months working on second editions of Coral reefs and Descent of man; the rest of the year was mostly devoted to further research on insectivorous plants. A…

Matches: 24 hits

  • 1874 was one of consolidation, reflection, and turmoil for Darwin. He spent the early months working
  • dispute over an anonymous review that attacked the work of Darwins son George dominated the second
  • and traveller Alexander von Humboldts 105th birthday, Darwin obliged with a reflection on his debt
  • during prolonged intervals’ ( letter to D. T. Gardner, [ c . 27 August 1874] ). The death of a
  • from W. D. Fox, 8 May [1874] ).  Such reminiscences led Darwin to the self-assessment, ‘as for one
  • I feel very old & helpless The year started for Darwin with a weeks visit to
  • Andrew Clark, whom he had been consulting since August 1873. Darwin had originally thought that
  • …  ( letter to B. J. Sulivan, 6 January [1874] ). Darwin mentioned his poor health so frequently in
  • from his silence on the matter ( letter from Ernst Haeckel, 26 October 1874 ). Séances, …
  • … ‘a cheat and an imposter’ ( letter from T. H. Huxley, 27 January 1874 ). Darwin agreed that it was
  • free to perform his antics’ ( letter to T. H. Huxley, 29 January [1874] ). This did not stop word
  • spirit séanceat his home ( letter from T. G. Appleton, 2 April 1874 ). Back over old
  • first edition, published in 1842 ( Correspondence  vol. 21, letter to Smith, Elder & Co., 17
  • bother of correction’ ( letter to H. E. Litchfield, 21 [March 1874] ). The book came out in June
  • expert on coral-reefs . In his preface ( Coral reefs  2d ed., pp. vvii), Darwin reasserted the
  • Darwin on this point ( letter from J. D. Dana, 21 July 1874 ); however, he did not retract his
  • surprising number of new facts and remarks’ ( Descent  2d ed., p. v). Among the many
  • Descent  was published in November 1874 ( letter from R. F. Cooke, 12 November 1874 ). Though
  • on subsequent print runs would be very good ( letter from R. F. Cooke, 12 November 1874 ). …
  • in a few hours dissolve the hardest cartilage, bone & meat &c. &c.’ ( letter to W. D. …
  • whether at theclose of the putrefaction of flesh, skin &c, any substance is produced before
  • details of an Australian variety of sundew ( letter from T. C. Copland, 23 June 1874 ). …
  • Sharpe for promotion at the British Museum ( letter to R. B. Sharpe, 24 November [1874] ).  He
  • head that M r  Spencers terms of equilibration &c always bother me & make everything less

Satire of FitzRoy's Narrative of the Voyages of the Adventure and Beagle, by John Clunies Ross. Transcription by Katharine Anderson

Summary

[f.146r Title page] Voyages of the Adventure and Beagle Supplement / to the 2nd 3rd and Appendix Volumes of the First / Edition Written / for and in the name of the Author of those / Volumes By J.C. Ross. / Sometime Master of a…

Matches: 29 hits

  • the Adventure and Beagle Supplement / to the 2 nd 3 rd and Appendix Volumes of
  • N o II of the foresaid works. By Captain Robert Fitzroy R.N. In the first Edition Mr
  • many Kentledge pigsand almost as heavylimited the 2 nd to 700 pages of easily readable type
  • for commanding under it an H.C. Cruizer [ vf.147v p.2 ] of considerably greater tonnageand
  • he is ready to admitthat althomany Captains R.N. do not hesitate to (unofficially) give the
  • obtain such a one I was (in a manner) compelled to take Mr Darwin on a far too independent footing. …
  • of this Supplement exhibit evidence to that effectin Mr Darwins instanceespecially in respect
  • of the PrefaceWe sailed from Plymouth on the 27 th December with a fresh easterly
  • making a quick passage to the Southward. In the 2 nd that the expressionsailed from
  • the water without making a foot of lee-wayin the 24 hoursoras much more time as might be
  • to be noticed. Being of course ambitious to rival Mr Darwin in the line of Theory-invention – …
  • distant from the landof which fifty she had run down 24 at 8 o'clockand going from that
  • that he seems to have held them as cheap as dirt. f.156v p.20 A word more on the subject of
  • … – with the exception of one of the classwhich Mr Darwin bribed the Aborigines to performwe
  • I therefore hit upon the expedient of giving it to Mr Darwin to put into his Volume. Heresaid
  • to the soils of the coral formation. Nevertheless Mr Darwin (doubtless from his not looking
  • and very pretty view.” Now bearing in mind that Mr Darwin is exceedinglyfondof dry bones
  • my fairness of statement that I have thus recapitulated Mr Darwins sentimentsalbeitso adverse
  • to which I allude are the following. J.C.R. [column continues across
  • calledthe Hippomanesand gave the command to R.C. Ross (brother to Mr J.C. Ross) the same who
  • rice could be obtainedwhen being aware from Captain R.C. Ross of his brother (Mr Ross') …
  • he had the honour of having made whilst commanding the H.C.C. Mary Ann under his Government of Java
  • establishing another Harem at Batavia.” IX Mr Darwin's volume of the Adventure and
  • this section (IX) of my report) I have to note that Mr Darwin has in that volume [column continues
  • sole reference to Malaysseeing, that he (an M.A. & F.R.S. – who isor has been, Secretary
  • to addmy brother Knight) Sir Edward BelcherCaptain R.N. ^to wit^ To his performances in that
  • marked in pencil233ff. Mar, 1908 E.W.J. / Examined by C.J.G.”] *[1] The Sage
  • Isles. They accordingly selected Mr R. M. WicheloPurser R.N. – but who had after the peace
  • otherwise than fromLeisks representations. (Signed J.C.R. …

Darwin in letters, 1864: Failing health

Summary

On receiving a photograph from Charles Darwin, the American botanist Asa Gray wrote on 11 July 1864: ‘the venerable beard gives the look of your having suffered, and … of having grown older’.  Because of poor health, Because of poor health, Darwin…

Matches: 23 hits

  • On receiving a photograph from Charles Darwin, the American botanist Asa Gray wrote on 11 July
  • … … of having grown older’. This portrait, the first of Darwin with his now famous beard, had been
  • 52 hours without vomiting!! In the same month, Darwin began to consult William Jenner, …
  • prescribed a variety of antacids and purgatives, and limited Darwins fluid intake; this treatment
  • the dimorphic aquatic cut-grass  Leersia . In May, Darwin finished his paper on  Lythrum
  • he had set aside the previous summer. In October, Darwin let his friends know that on his
  • to the surgeon and naturalist Francis Trevelyan Buckland, Darwin described his symptoms in some
  • November and December were also marked by the award to Darwin of the Royal Societys Copley Medal; …
  • been unsuccessfully nominated the two previous years. As Darwin explained to his cousin William
  • it was conferred, brought a dramatic conclusion to the year. Darwin also wrote to Fox that he was
  • progressin Britain. Challenging convention Darwins concern about the acceptance of
  • indoors ( Correspondence  vol. 11). In a letter of [27 January 1864] , Darwin wrote to Hooker: …
  • …  produce tendrils However, the queries that Darwin, describing himself asa broken-down
  • climber & therefore sacred’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 2 June [1864] ). When Darwin
  • of changes . . .’ When he told Asa Gray in a letter of 29 October [1864] that he was continuing
  • was published, Darwin remarked to Hooker in a letter of 26 November [1864] that nothing had
  • of the two species with the common oxlip. In a letter of 22 October [1864] , Darwin triumphantly
  • …  ( letter from Emma and Charles Darwin to W. E. Darwin, [20 May 1864] ), or his excitement