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List of correspondents

Summary

Below is a list of Darwin's correspondents with the number of letters for each one. Click on a name to see the letters Darwin exchanged with that correspondent.    "A child of God" (1) Abberley,…

Matches: 9 hits

  • … Below is a list of Darwin's correspondents with the number of letters for each one. …
  • … (1) Abney, W. de W. (3) Accademia dei Lincei …
  • … (1) Ainslie, O. A. (3) Airy, Hubert …
  • … (4) Alberts, Maurice (3) Albrecht, R. F. …
  • … (1) Ambrose, J. L. (3) American Academy of …
  • … James (1) Anderson, James (c) (3) …
  • … (1) Badger, E. W. (3) Baer, K. E. von …
  • … (1) Berliner Gesellschaft für Anthropologie, Ethnologie und Urgeschichte …
  • … Dareste, Camille (9) Darwin family (1) …

Dramatisation script

Summary

Re: Design – Adaptation of the Correspondence of Charles Darwin, Asa Gray and others… by Craig Baxter – as performed 25 March 2007

Matches: 24 hits

  • Re: DesignAdaptation of the Correspondence of Charles Darwin, Asa Gray and othersby Craig
  • as the creator of this dramatisation, and that of the Darwin Correspondence Project to be identified
  • correspondence or published writings of Asa Gray, Charles Darwin, Joseph Dalton Hooker, Jane Loring
  • Actor 1Asa Gray Actor 2Charles Darwin Actor 3In the dress of a modern day
  • Agassiz, Adam Sedgwick, A Friend of John Stuart Mill, Emma Darwin, Horace Darwinand acts as a sort
  • the play unfolds and acting as a go-between between Gray and Darwin, and between the audience and
  • this, he sends out copies of his Review of the Life of Darwin. At this time in his life, Asa
  • friends in England, copies of hisReview of the Life of Darwin’… pencilling the address so that it
  • friend, the botanist, Joseph D Hooker GRAY:   3   Charles Darwinmade his home on
  • are kept in check by a constitutional weakness. DARWIN: A plain but comfortable brick
  • does not lie with the Photographer. GRAY:   30   Could not you come over [to the
  • is sent you on the same terms? DARWIN31   Very sincere thanks for your kind
  • quietest routine life in the country. GRAY:   32   My dear Mr Darwin… [I received] …
  • one) I am well pleased to have. DARWIN33   My dear Hooker. Thanks, also, for
  • and so by no means does you justice. HOOKER:   34   I believe I have very little
  • either silly or stupid or affected. DARWIN35   My dear Dr. GrayI must send you
  • Gray is momentarily embarrassed. GRAY:   36   Well, I never meant to draw any
  • undertakings I have long ago begun. DARWIN37   When I said that your remarks on
  • has perhaps already said too much. GRAY:   38   My dear Mr DarwinI did not know
  • he has given too much away. DARWIN:   39   I daresay I may be quite in error: …
  • quite kindly, and told meHugh Falconer (Actor 3) – a Scottish paleobotanist and
  • and in a lesser degreeBloods One Penny Envelope, 1, 3, and 10 cents’. If you will make him this
  • paragraph, in which I quote and differ from you[r178   doctrine that each variation has been
  • ARTS AND SCIENCES, PROCEEDINGS XVII, 1882 4  C DARWIN TO JD HOOKER 10 MAY 1848

Darwin in letters, 1860: Answering critics

Summary

On 7 January 1860, John Murray published the second edition of Darwin’s Origin of species, printing off another 3000 copies to satisfy the demands of an audience that surprised both the publisher and the author. It wasn't long, however, before ‘the…

Matches: 23 hits

  • 7 January 1860, John Murray published the second edition of Darwins  Origin of species , printing
  • But it was the opinion of scientific men that was Darwins main concern. He eagerly scrutinised each
  • his views. ‘One cannot expect fairness in a Reviewer’, Darwin commented to Hooker after reading an
  • at all concern his main argument ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 3 January [1860] ). Darwins
  • butunfairreviews that misrepresented his ideas, Darwin began to feel that without the early
  • beenutterly  smashed’ ( letter to T. H. Huxley, 3 July [1860] ). (A chronological list of all
  • it was his methodological criticism in the accusation that Darwin haddeserted the inductive track, …
  • to J. S. Henslow, 8 May [1860] ). Above all else Darwin prided himself on having developed a
  • was a hypothesis, not a theory, therefore also displeased Darwin. Comparing natural selection to the
  • it comes in time to be admitted as real.’ ( letter to C. J. F. Bunbury, 9 February [1860] ). This
  • issue of  Macmillans Magazine . Fawcett asserted that Darwins theory accorded well with John
  • induction, ratiocination, and then verification. Darwin and his critics Specific
  • the origin of life itself, which the theory did not address. Darwin chose to treat this as an
  • things, about the multitude of still living simple forms. Darwin readily admitted that his failure
  • it into his method of reasoning about global change. Darwin also knew that Lyell was a powerful
  • of the origin and distribution of blind cave animals. Darwin attempted to answer each of these
  • to one another. Harveys letters reveal aspects of Darwins theory that gave contemporary
  • discomfort. After several long letters were exchanged, Darwin finally decided that Harvey and other
  • whose offspring should be infertileinter se ,’ Darwins theory would remain unproven (T. H. …
  • because more accustomed to reasoning.’ ( letter to A. R. Wallace, 18 May 1860 ). Darwin
  • and five botanists ( see letter to J. D. Hooker, 3 March [1860] ). Others, like François Jules
  • I gaze at it, makes me sick!’ ( letter to Asa Gray, 3 April [1860] ). By the end of 1860, …
  • is best thing for subject.—’ ( letter to T. H. Huxley, 3 July [1860] ). Further details of the

Darwin in letters, 1868: Studying sex

Summary

The quantity of Darwin’s correspondence increased dramatically in 1868 due largely to his ever-widening research on human evolution and sexual selection.Darwin’s theory of sexual selection as applied to human descent led him to investigate aspects of the…

Matches: 27 hits

  • …   On 6 March 1868, Darwin wrote to the entomologist and accountant John Jenner Weir, ‘If any
  • he ought to do what I am doing pester them with letters.’ Darwin was certainly true to his word. The
  • and sexual selection. In  Origin , pp. 8790, Darwin had briefly introduced the concept of
  • process. In a letter to Alfred Russel Wallace in 1864, Darwin claimed that sexual selection wasthe
  • to the stridulation of crickets. At the same time, Darwin continued to collect material on
  • his immediate circle of friends and relations. In July 1868 Darwin was still anticipating that his
  • which was devoted to sexual selection in the animal kingdom. Darwin described his thirst for
  • in January 1868. A final delay caused by the indexing gave Darwin much vexation. ‘My book is
  • Murray to intervene, complaining on 9 January , ‘M r . Dallasdelayis intolerableI am
  • pages feel fairly nauseated’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 3 February [1868] ). But such worries were
  • it was by Gray himself, but Darwin corrected him: ‘D r  Gray would strike me in the face, but not
  • … . It is a disgrace to the paper’ ( letter from A. R. Wallace, 24 February [1868] ). The review was
  • April 1868 . The letter was addressed tothe Rev d  C. Darwin M.d’; Binstead evidently assumed
  • kind almost heroic, in you to sacrifice your hair and pay 3 d  in the cause of science
  • canary (letters from J. J. Weir, [26] March 1868 and 3 June 1868 ). ‘It was very kind’, …
  • it is clear that I have none’ ( letter to J. J. Weir, 30 May [1868] ). Sexual selection
  • I did not see this, or rather I saw it only obs[c]urely, & have kept only a few references.’ …
  • of the female’, and of rats, John Bush observed on 30 March that two members of thelecherous
  • on 9 September . Darwin annotated a letter sent on 3 April by Henry Doubleday that contained a
  • as life he wd find the odour sexual!’ ( letter to A . R. Wallace, 16 September [1868] ). Francis
  • south of France to Sarah Elizabeth Wedgwood on 9 Novembe r, describing sphinx moths that were
  • question of theOrigin of Species”’ ( letter from A. R. Wallace, 4 October 1868 ). …
  • hands of the enemies of Nat. Selection’ ( letter from A. R. Wallace, 8 [April] 1868 ). …
  • mission stations in Victoria, Australia ( letter from R. B. Smyth, 13 August 1868 ); lengthy
  • of her two-month old daughter Katherine ( letter from C. M. Hawkshaw to Emma Darwin, 9 February
  • April 1868 , 17 June 1868 , 9 September 1868 , and 31 October 1868 ). ‘Heaven knows’, …
  • rest mostly on faith, and on accumulation of adaptations, &c) … Of course I understand your

Language: key letters

Summary

How and why language evolved bears on larger questions about the evolution of the human species, and the relationship between man and animals. Darwin presented his views on the development of human speech from animal sounds in The Descent of Man (1871),…

Matches: 13 hits

  • human species, and the relationship between man and animals. Darwin presented his views on the
  • he first began to reflect on the transmutation of species. Darwins correspondence reveals the scope
  • whom he exchanged information and ideas. Letter 346Darwin, C. R. to Darwin, C. S., 27 Feb
  • one stock.” Letter 2070Wedgwood, Hensleigh to Darwin, C. R., [before 29 Sept 1857] …
  • because we can trace the elements into Latin, German &c. but I see much the same sort of thing
  • the grinding down of former continents.” Letter 3054Darwin, C. R. to Lyell, Charles, 2
  • that languages, like species, were separately created. Darwin writes to the geologist Charles Lyell
  • him is perfectly logical.” Letter 5605Darwin, C. R. to Müller, J. F. T., 15 Aug [1867] …
  • Letter 7040Wedgwood, Hensleigh to Darwin, C. R., [1868-70?] As Darwin began to work on
  • growing to such a stageLetter 8367Darwin, C. R. to Wright, Chauncey, 3 June [1872] …
  • altering the breed. Letter 8962Darwin, C. R. to Max Müller, Friedrich, 3 July 1873
  • Letter 10194Max Müller, Friedrich to Darwin, C. R., 13 Oct [1875] For Müller, human and
  • … […]” Letter 9887Dawkins, W. B. to Darwin, C. R., 14 Mar 1875 The relationship

Darwin’s reading notebooks

Summary

In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he wished to read in Notebook C (Notebooks, pp. 319–28). In 1839, these lists were copied and continued in separate notebooks. The first of these reading notebooks (DAR 119…

Matches: 24 hits

  • In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he wished to
  • … (DAR 119) opens with five pages of text copied from Notebook C and carries on through 1851; the
  • used these notebooks extensively in dating and annotating Darwins letters; the full transcript
  • … *128). For clarity, the transcript does not record Darwins alterations. The spelling and
  • book had been consulted. Those cases where it appears that Darwin made a genuine deletion have been
  • a few instances, primarily in theBooks Readsections, Darwin recorded that a work had been
  • of the books listed in the other two notebooks. Sometimes Darwin recorded that an abstract of the
  • own. Soon after beginning his first reading notebook, Darwin began to separate the scientific
  • the second reading notebook. Readers primarily interested in Darwins scientific reading, therefore, …
  • and this manuscript catalogue is in the Darwin Library (AC.34). Darwins books were bequeathed to
  • to be Read [DAR *119: Inside Front Cover] C. Darwin June 1 st . 1838
  • Surgeons [DAR *119: 1] Books to be Read 3Traité de la Folie des
  • Richardsons Fauna Borealis [J. Richardson 182937] Entomological Magazine.—? paper on
  • on Annals of Nat. Hist. [Jenyns 1838] Prichard; a 3 d . vol [Prichard 183647] Lawrence [W. …
  • … [DAR *119: 2v.] Whites regular gradation in man [C. White 1799] Lindleys
  • Voyage aux terres australes [Péron 1824]— Chap. 39. tom. 4. p. 273. Latreille Geographie des
  • in brutes Blackwood June 1838 [J. F. Ferrie 1838]. H. C. Watson on Geog. distrib: of Brit: …
  • Wiegman has pub. German pamphlet on crossing oats &c [Wiegmann 1828] Horticultural
  • in Library of Hort. Soc. [DAR *119:5v.] M c .Neil 16  has written good article
  • … [Fellows 1839] Catherine 48 Life of Collins R.A. [Collins 1848] Phases of Faith
  • 1848Memoirs of the life of William   Collins, Esq., R.A.  2 vols. London.  *119: 23; 119: …
  • by Richard Owen.  Vol. 4 of  The works of John Hunter, F.R.S. with notes . Edited by James F. …
  • Robert. 1843Memoirs of the life of John   Constable, R.A., composed chiefly of his letters. …
  • Peacock, George. 1855Life of Thomas Young, M.D., F.R.S.  London.  *128: 172; 128: 21

Darwin in letters, 1880: Sensitivity and worms

Summary

There are summaries of all Darwin's letters from the year 1880 on this website.  The full texts of the letters are not yet available online but are in volume 28 of the print edition of The correspondence of Charles Darwin, published by Cambridge…

Matches: 22 hits

  • There are summaries of all Darwin's letters from the year 1880 on this website.  The full texts
  • 28 of the print edition of The correspondence of Charles Darwin , published by Cambridge
  • to adapt to varying conditions. The implications of Darwins work for the boundary between animals
  • studies of animal instincts by George John Romanes drew upon Darwins early observations of infants, …
  • of evolution and creation. Many letters flowed between Darwin and his children, as he took delight
  • Financial support for science was a recurring issue, as Darwin tried to secure a Civil List pension
  • with Samuel Butler, prompted by the publication of Erasmus Darwin the previous year. …
  • Charles Harrison Tindal, sent a cache of letters from two of Darwins grandfathers clerical friends
  • divines to see a pigs body opened is very amusing’, Darwin replied, ‘& that about my
  • registry offices, and produced a twenty-page history of the Darwin family reaching back to the
  • Kingdom, & even the world’ ( letter from J. L. Chester, 3 March 1880 ). Darwins sons George
  • and conciliate a few whose ancestors had not featured in Darwins Life . ‘In an endeavour to
  • by anticipation the position I have taken as regards D r Erasmus Darwin in my book Evolution old
  • regret that I did not do so’ ( letter to Samuel Butler, 3 January 1880 ). At the top of Butlers
  • to the end’, added her husband Richard ( letter from R. B. Litchfield, 1 February 1880 ). Even the
  • It is a horrid disease’ ( letter from T. H. Huxley, 3 February 1880 ).                 All
  • lettermade me open my eyes’, Gray replied on 3 February , but he affirmed his original
  • shake their heads in the same dismal manner as you & M r . Murray did, when I told them my
  • in a book about beetles the impressive wordscaptured by C. Darwin”. … This seemed to me glory
  • … ‘but the subject has amused me’ ( letter to W. C. McIntosh, 18 June 1880 ). Members of the family
  • great doctrines …“Come of Age”‘ ( letter from W. C. Williamson to Emma Darwin, 2 September 1880 ). …
  • his voice as clearly as if he were present’ (letters to C. W. Fox, 29 March 1880 and 10 [April

Dates of composition of Darwin's manuscript on species

Summary

Many of the dates of letters in 1856 and 1857 were based on or confirmed by reference to Darwin’s manuscript on species (DAR 8--15.1, inclusive; transcribed and published as Natural selection). This manuscript, begun in May 1856, was nearly completed by…

Matches: 11 hits

  • in 1856 and 1857 were based on or confirmed by reference to Darwins manuscript on species (DAR 8- …
  • May 1856, was nearly completed by June 1858. At that point Darwin wasinterrupted’, as he put it, …
  • transmutation ( letter to Charles Lyell, 18 [June 1858] ). Darwin recorded in hisJournalthe
  • in theJournaland the chapter headings as supplied by Darwin, followed by the reference of the
  • also given. Chapter 1 is not extant nor was it recorded in Darwin'sJournal’. Chapter 2 is not
  • selection , pp. 534--66) 3 16 December 1856
  • to external agencies (DAR 8; Natural selection , pp. 35--91) 4
  • 5 3 March 1857 The struggle for existence as bearing on
  • 6 31 March 1857 On natural selection (DAR 10.2; …
  • species compared (DAR 11.1; Natural selection , pp. 279--338) 8
  • chapter has been taken from a table of contents to which Darwin added the names of chapters as he

Darwin in letters, 1865: Delays and disappointments

Summary

The year was marked by three deaths of personal significance to Darwin: Hugh Falconer, a friend and supporter; Robert FitzRoy, captain of the Beagle; and William Jackson Hooker, director of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, and father of Darwin’s friend…

Matches: 23 hits

  • In 1865, the chief work on Charles Darwins mind was the writing of  The variation of animals and
  • letters on climbing plants to make another paper. Darwin also submitted a manuscript of his
  • protégé, John Scott, who was now working in India. Darwins transmutation theory continued to
  • Argyll, appeared in the religious weeklyGood Words . Darwin received news of an exchange of
  • Butler, and, according to Butler, the bishop of Wellington. Darwins theory was discussed at an
  • in the  GardenersChronicleAt the end of the year, Darwin was elected an honorary member of
  • year was marked by three deaths of personal significance to Darwin: Hugh Falconer, a friend of
  • in August. There was also a serious dispute between two of Darwins friends, John Lubbock and
  • jolly’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 7 January [1865] ). Darwin was ready to submit his paper on
  • well, his tone was enthusiastic and energetic. However, on 31 January, Hugh Falconer died after a
  • … ( see letter from Hugh Falconer to Erasmus Alvey Darwin, 3 January 1865 ). Erasmus forwarded his
  • these alone are unalloyed’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 3 February 1865 ). Darwin, now
  • than anything else. I am able most days to work for 2 or 3 hours & this makes all the difference
  • the last & concluding one’ ( letter to John Murray, 31 March [1865] ). In April he authorised
  • Darwin had received a copy of Müllers bookFür Darwin , a study of the Crustacea with reference
  • Müllers name ( see letter from Fritz Müller, [12 and 31 August, and 10 October 1865] ; since it
  • … … inheritance, reversion, effects of use & disuse &c’, and which he intended to publish in
  • the serenity of the Christian world’ (Brewster 1862, p. 3). John Hutton Balfour, though he had sent
  • resurrection of Jesus Christ  ( letter to Samuel Butler, 30 September [1865] ). He later sent a
  • He wrote to Hooker, ‘I doubt whether you or I or any one c d  do any good in healing this breach. …
  • Hookers behalf, ‘He asks if you saw the article of M r . Croll in the last Reader on the
  • of reform and reorganisation ( letter from J. D. Hooker, [3 November 1865] ). The death of
  • … ‘As for your thinking that you do not deserve the C[opley] Medal,’ he rebuked Hooker, ‘that I

Darwin's in letters, 1873: Animal or vegetable?

Summary

Having laboured for nearly five years on human evolution, sexual selection, and the expression of emotions, Darwin was able to devote 1873 almost exclusively to his beloved plants. He resumed work on the digestive powers of sundews and Venus fly traps, and…

Matches: 29 hits

  • evolution, sexual selection, and the expression of emotions, Darwin was able to devote 1873 almost
  • … (1875) and  Cross and self fertilisation  (1876). Darwins son Francis became increasingly
  • career to become his fathers scientific secretary. Darwin had always relied on assistance from
  • Franciss decision. A large portion of the letters Darwin received in 1873 were in response
  • the previous year. As was typical, readers wrote to Darwin personally to offer suggestions, …
  • some of which were incorporated in a later edition. Darwin also contributed to discussions in the
  • Francis Galtons work on inherited talent, which prompted Darwin to reflect on the traits and
  • Station at Naples. Plants that eat and feel? Darwin had resumed experiments on the
  • 12 January [1873] ).  Drosera  was the main focus of Darwins study of insectivorous plants, a
  • and alkaloids, and even electrical stimulation. On sending Darwin a specimen of the carnivorous  …
  • … ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 12 January 1873 ). Darwin found that the glandular hairs on the
  • to bend inward, so that the plant closed like a fist. Darwin was fascinated by this transmission of
  • plants , p. 63). The plants secreted a viscid fluid, which Darwin suspected attracted insects by
  • … ., p. 17). Through a series of painstaking experiments, Darwin determined that the secretions
  • botanist Mary Treat, who performed experiments suggested by Darwin on the North American species  …
  • … . He began to perform experiments modelled on those of Darwin, feeding the plant egg and raw meat, …
  • guide to animal experimentation that Klein had co-authored. Darwin contacted two of the  Handbook
  • London, and director of the Brown InstitutionDarwin sent an abstract of his preliminary
  • muscle and nerve tissue of animals. Burdon Sanderson visited Darwin at Down in July and was drawn
  • of inheritance!” ( letter to F. S. B. F. de Chaumont, 3 February [1873] ). Some readers
  • civilisation and good breeding ( letter from Henry Reeks, 3 March 1873 ). Robert Swinhoe
  • of the disease ( letter to James Crichton-Browne, 30 December 1873 ). Instinct  In
  • without instruction or previously acquired knowledge” (A. R. Wallace 1870, p. 204). Moggridge
  • some with his finger ( letter to  Nature , [before 3 April 1873] ). Moggridge suggested the
  • offend his father ( enclosure to letter from T. H. Huxley, 3 December 1873 ).  In April, …
  • the passage of purgatory” ( letter from Andrew Clark, 3 September 1873 ). Revising
  • believes whether or not they are sound” ( letter to A. R. Wallace, 17 November 1873 ). But no
  • unorthodoxy, troubling and potentially undermining (J. R. Moore 1985, pp. 4712). A courted
  • a personification of Natural Filosofy” ( letter from J. C. Costerus and N. D. Doedes, 18 March 1873

Fake Darwin: myths and misconceptions

Summary

Many myths have persisted about Darwin's life and work. Here are a few of the more pervasive ones, with full debunking below...

Matches: 1 hits

  • … Many myths have persisted about Darwin's life and work. Here are a few of the more pervasive …

Darwin in letters, 1872: Job done?

Summary

'My career’, Darwin wrote towards the end of 1872, 'is so nearly closed. . .  What little more I can do, shall be chiefly new work’, and the tenor of his correspondence throughout the year is one of wistful reminiscence, coupled with a keen eye…

Matches: 26 hits

  • … ‘My career’, Darwin wrote towards the end of 1872, ‘is so nearly closed. . .  What little
  • of   On the origin of   species , intended to be Darwins last, and of  Expression of the
  • books brought a strong if deceptive sense of a job now done: Darwin intended, he declared to Alfred
  • on 'so difficult a subject, as evolution’ ( letter to ARWallace,  27 July [1872] ). …
  • of books and papers, and the latter formed the subject of Darwins last bookThe formation of   …
  • worms , published in the year before his deathDespite Darwins declared intention to take up new
  • begun many years before. In his private life also, Darwin was in a nostalgic frame of mind, …
  • The last word on Origin The year opened with Darwin, helped by his eldest son William, …
  • my views’, he wrote to his publisher, John Murray, on 30 January , shortly after correcting the
  • set the final price at 7 s.  6 d.  ( letter from RFCooke, 12 February 1872 ). …
  • remained unpublished at the end of the year ( letter from C.-FReinwald, 23 November 1872 ). …
  • Whale  & duck  most beautiful’ ( letter from ARWallace, 3 March 1872 ). I
  • … `chiefly perhaps because I do it badly’ ( letter to ARWallace, 3 August [1872] ).  …
  • … , and he complained to the German zoologist Anton Dohrn on 3 February that Mivarts book had &#039
  • … ( letter from Samuel Butler to Francis Darwin, [before 30 May 1872] , and letter from Samuel
  • from his ignorance, he feels no doubts’ ( letter to FCDonders, 17 June 1872 ). Right up to the
  • Nature  in Wallaces defence ( letter to  Nature  , 3 August [1872] ).  Although the two
  • Charlton Bastians recent book on the origin of life (HCBastian 1872; Wallace 1872d) left him
  • … & new views which are daily turning up’ ( letter to ARWallace, 28 August [1872] ).  …
  • Lord Sackville Cecil, to attend a séance ( letter from MCStanley, 4 June 1872 ). There was
  • you agreed to let them have it for love!!!’ ( letter from RFCooke, 1 August 1872 ). It
  • …  & have not taken care of ourselves’ ( letter from RFCooke, 20 November 1872 ). A
  • ready, on the eve of publication they were still short by 3000 sets of plates, leading Cooke to
  • gift, although he doubted he would ever use it ( letter to CLDodgson, 10 December 1872 ). …
  • try `with straight blunt knitting needle’ ( letter to LCWedgwood, 5 January [1872] ) to
  • to which any scientific man can look’ ( letter to FCDonders, 29 April [1872] ). …

Women’s scientific participation

Summary

Observers | Fieldwork | Experimentation | Editors and critics | Assistants Darwin’s correspondence helps bring to light a community of women who participated, often actively and routinely, in the nineteenth-century scientific community. Here is a…

Matches: 23 hits

  • … |  Editors and critics  |  Assistants Darwins correspondence helps bring to light a
  • community. Here is a selection of letters exchanged between Darwin and his workforce of women
  • Women: Letter 1194 - Darwin to Whitby, M. A. T., [12 August 1849] Darwin
  • breeds, or peculiarities in inheritance. Letter 3787 - Darwin, H. E. to Darwin, [29
  • in her garden. Letter 4523 - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, [6 June 1864] …
  • Egypt. Letter 7223 - Darwin to Wedgwood, L. C., [8 June 1867 - 72] Darwin
  • Letter 5817 - Darwin to Huxley, T. H., [30 January 1868] Darwin asks Thomas Huxley to
  • Henrietta. Letter 7179 - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, [5 May 1870] …
  • and bird observations from Calcutta. Letter 3634 - Darwin to Gray, A., [1 July 1862
  • the wallpaper. Letter 5756 - Langton, E. & C. to Wedgwood S. E., [after 9
  • Letter 1701 - Morris, M. H. to Prior, R. C. A., [17 June 1855] Margaretta Hare Morris
  • shores of mountain lakes in Pennsylvania. Letter 3681  - Wedgwood, M. S. to Darwin, …
  • in Llandudno. Letter 4823  - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, H. E., [May 1865] …
  • Letter 8144 - Darwin to Wedgwood, L. C., [5 January 1872] Darwin asks his niece, …
  • Lychnis diurna. Letter 8168 - Ruck, A. R . to Darwin, H., [20 January 1872] …
  • lawn. Letter 8224 - Darwin to Ruck, A. R., [24 February 1872] Darwin
  • Letter 9606 - Harrison, L. C. to Darwin, [22 August 1874] Darwins niece, Lucy, …
  • Letter 10439 - Treat, M. to Darwin, [3 April 1876] Mary Treat describes a field trip
  • her fieldwork on the common. Men: