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Darwin's in letters, 1873: Animal or vegetable?

Summary

Having laboured for nearly five years on human evolution, sexual selection, and the expression of emotions, Darwin was able to devote 1873 almost exclusively to his beloved plants. He resumed work on the digestive powers of sundews and Venus fly traps, and…

Matches: 24 hits

  • … and the expression of emotions, Darwin was able to devote 1873 almost exclusively to his beloved …
  • … and  Cross and self fertilisation  (1876). Darwin’s son Francis became increasingly involved in …
  • … renouncing plans for a medical career to become his father’s scientific secretary. Darwin had always …
  • … The subject was brought closer to home by Francis Galton’s work on inherited talent, which prompted …
  • … efforts to alleviate the financial troubles of Anton Dohrn’s Zoological Station at Naples. …
  • … to have observed” ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 12 January [1873] ).  Drosera  was the main focus of …
  • … leaf & branch!” ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 12 January 1873 ). Darwin found that the …
  • … properties analogous to those in  Drosera . Darwin’s experiments on plant movement and digestion …
  • … copy of the  Handbook for the physiological laboratory  (1873), a detailed guide to animal …
  • … solution to Frankland for analysis. Following Frankland’s advice, he performed his own tests and …
  • … enzyme. Cross- and self-fertilisation Darwin’s other main focus of botanical …
  • … & correlated” ( letter to T. H. Farrer, 14 August 1873 ). Darwin worried, however, that …
  • … when it will be ready” ( letter to John Murray, 4 May [1873] ). Keeping it in the family …
  • … their burrows” ( letter from Francis Darwin, 14 August [1873] ). In September, Darwin …
  • … will be created” ( letter to E. A. Darwin, 20 September 1873 ). Erasmus, who had studied medicine …
  • … work” ( letter from E. A. Darwin, 25 September [1873] ).  Shortly afterwards, it was arranged for …
  • … 1872 and sold quickly. He wrote to Hooker on 12 January [1873] , “Did I ever boast to you on the …
  • … anonymously in the  Edinburgh Review  in April ([Baynes] 1873). Darwin asked one of his Scottish …
  • … during lectures, indicating attention. A friend of CD’s daughter Henrietta recollected the …
  • … “I’m to starve sweat & purge it away” ( letter from G. H. Darwin, [1 October 1873] ). He also …
  • … some little happiness & enjoyment in life” ( letter to G. H. Darwin, 5 March [1873] ). Darwin …
  • … “It is a good omen for the future” ( letter to G. H. Darwin, 2 August [1873] ). But he was more …
  • … world his opinions on the deepest subjects?” ( letter to G. H. Darwin, 21 October [1873] ). Darwin …
  • … “most strongly on public grounds” ( letter from G. S. Ffinden to Emma Darwin, 24 December 1873 ).  …

Darwin and the Church

Summary

The story of Charles Darwin’s involvement with the church is one that is told far too rarely. It shows another side of the man who is more often remembered for his personal struggles with faith, or for his role in large-scale controversies over the…

Matches: 23 hits

  • The story of Charles Darwins involvement with the church is one that is told far too rarely. It
  • into this complicated relationship throughout Darwins life, as it reveals his personal and
  • … (and doubt) than many non-conformist denominations. Darwins parents attended a Unitarian chapel
  • A nominal adherence to the Anglican Churchs teachings was still essential for admittance to many of
  • necessary studies to be a clergyman. During Darwins lifetime, the vast majority of the
  • with the pursuit of scientific interests. Indeed, Darwins Cambridge mentorJohn Stevens Henslow, …
  • clergymen naturalists. A nostalgic piece in Blackwoods Edinburgh Magazine described the early
  • on every side his own snug ivy-covered house’ (Blackwoods Edinburgh Magazine (1887): 321). …
  • to Caroline Darwin, 256 April [1832] ). Darwins sisters were extremely supportive of his desire
  • … (letter to W. D. Fox, [912 August] 1835 ). Darwins doubts about orthodox belief, and his
  • went dutifully to the local Anglican church of St Marys each Sunday. All the children were baptised
  • their children Mary and Charles were buried; later Darwins brother Erasmus, Emmas sister Sarah, …
  • of the letters highlighted in this section focus on Darwins long-standing relationship with the
  • was named perpetual curate of Down in 1846 (Crockfords). Innes was a High-Churchman, that is, a
  • end of his life Innes refused to be persuaded by Darwins theory of evolution, but nevertheless
  • Inness approval the reins passed to George Sketchley Ffinden. Darwins relationship with
  • informed Darwin that though heheard all good of M r . Ffindens moral character, his clerical
  • Innes, 5 June 1871 ). Particularly in the early days of Ffindens tenure, Innes continued to keep
  • particular sums on the expectation of particular results. Ffinden strongly disapproved of the
  • as a reading room for the working classes in the evening. Ffinden opposed the activity, and as a
  • … (letter to Down School Board, [after 29 November 1873] ). Ffinden fiercely resented Darwin for
  • April [1875] ). The tensions between the Darwins and Ffinden over the management of parish
  • Press in association with Nova Pacifica. Paz, D. G., ed. 1995Nineteenth-century English

Darwin in letters, 1875: Pulling strings

Summary

‘I am getting sick of insectivorous plants’, Darwin confessed in January 1875. He had worked on the subject intermittently since 1859, and had been steadily engaged on a book manuscript for nine months; January also saw the conclusion of a bitter dispute…

Matches: 26 hits

  • Plants always held an important place in Darwins theorising about species, and botanical research
  • the controversy involved a slanderous attack upon Darwins son George, in an anonymous review in
  • V). Darwin remained bitter and dissatisfied with Mivarts attempts at conciliation, and spent weeks
  • of London, and a secretary of the Linnean Society, Darwins friends had to find ways of coming to
  • the publisher of the Quarterly Review , in which Mivarts anonymous essay had appeared. ‘I told
  • feel now like a pure forgiving Christian!’ Darwins ire was not fully spent, however, for he
  • The vivisection issue was a delicate one within Darwins family, and he tried to balance his concern
  • paper sent me by Miss Cobbe.’ Darwin found Cobbes memorial inflammatory and unfair in its
  • on 12 May, one week after a rival bill based on Cobbes memorial had been read in the House of Lords
  • on vivisection , p. 183). Darwin learned of Kleins testimony from Huxley on 30 October 1875 : …
  • medicine in London. Klein had assisted in some of Darwins botanical research and had visited Down
  • …   Poisons, plants, and print-runs Darwins keen interest in the progress of physiology
  • of protoplasm. He added the details of Brunton and Fayrers experiments to Insectivorous plants , …
  • I can say is that I am ready to commit suicide.’ Darwins despair over the revision process may have
  • … ). In the event, the book sold well, and Murrays partner, Robert Cooke, politely scolded
  • insects were observed in the field, and some of Darwins experiments on digestion were then repeated
  • about the same time. As was the case with some of Darwins previous publications, however, the
  • were finished. An elusive case Darwins attention seems to have been largely on
  • between the men in 1874, and this was enhanced by Romaness visit to Down House: ‘The place was one
  • remain one of the most agreeable and interesting of memorys pictures.’ Though trained in zoology
  • red half has become wholly white’ ( letter from G. J. Romanes, [before 4 November 1874] ).   …
  • heavily on his son Francis, who had made the decision in 1873 to abandon his medical studies and
  • of a review of William Dwight Whitneys work on language (G. H. Darwin 1874c). George had taken the
  • knowledge wd. allow me.’   thorns in Mr Ffindens side Tempers flared
  • the authority of the Church. After becoming vicar in 1871, Ffinden had opposed their efforts, and
  • on the digestive properties of Nepenthes since 1873. ‘You are aware that Dr Hooker has worked

Darwin in letters, 1874: A turbulent year

Summary

The year 1874 was one of consolidation, reflection, and turmoil for Darwin. He spent the early months working on second editions of Coral reefs and Descent of man; the rest of the year was mostly devoted to further research on insectivorous plants. A…

Matches: 15 hits

  • … over an anonymous review that attacked the work of Darwin’s son George dominated the second half of …
  • … been the naturalist and traveller Alexander von Humboldt’s 105th birthday, Darwin obliged with a …
  • … The death of a Cambridge friend, Albert Way, caused Darwin’s cousin, William Darwin Fox, to …
  • … led Darwin to the self-assessment, ‘as for one’s body growing old there is no help for it, & I …
  • … The year started for Darwin with a week’s visit to London, staying at his brother Erasmus’s house.  …
  • … in London, his son George organised a séance at Erasmus’s house. The event was led by the medium …
  • … another Williams séance was held at the home of Darwin’s cousin Hensleigh Wedgwood. Those present …
  • … to get the two men on each side of him to hold each other’s hands, instead of his, ‘& that he …
  • … had suggested a new edition of the coral book in December 1873, when he realised the difficulty a …
  • …  vol. 21, letter to Smith, Elder & Co., 17 December [1873] ). Darwin himself had some trouble …
  • … of human evolution and inheritance himself.  In August 1873, he had published in the  Contemporary …
  • … ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 20 July [1874] ). In 1873, Hooker had begun a series of …
  • …  vol. 21, letter from Francis Darwin,  [11 October 1873] ). Darwin wasted several weeks in …
  • … Moulinié, who had died after a period of ill health in 1873.  Edmond Barbier corrected defects in …
  • … was a copy of Joseph Simms’s book on physiognomy (Simms 1873), which contained Darwin’s portrait to …