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Darwin in letters, 1869: Forward on all fronts

Summary

At the start of 1869, Darwin was hard at work making changes and additions for a fifth edition of  Origin. He may have resented the interruption to his work on sexual selection and human evolution, but he spent forty-six days on the task. Much of the…

Matches: 14 hits

  • At the start of 1869, Darwin was hard at work making changes and additions for a fifth edition of  …
  • appeared at the end of 1866 and had told his cousin William Darwin Fox, ‘My work will have to stop a
  • views on all points will have to be modified.— Well it is a beginning, & that is something’ ( …
  • material on emotional expression. Yet the scope of Darwins interests remained extremely broad, and
  • plants, and earthworms, subjects that had exercised Darwin for decades, and that would continue to
  • Carl von  Nägeli and perfectibility Darwins most substantial addition to  Origin  was a
  • principal engine of change in the development of species. Darwin correctly assessed Nägelis theory
  • in most morphological features (Nägeli 1865, p. 29). Darwin sent a manuscript of his response (now
  • made any blunders, as is very likely to be the case’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 13 January 1869 ). …
  • than I now see is possible or probable’ (see also letter to A. R. Wallace, 22 January [1869] , …
  • is strengthened by the facts in distribution’ ( letter to James Croll, 31 January [1869] ). Darwin
  • tropical species using Crolls theory. In the same letter to Croll, Darwin had expressed
  • a very long period  before  the Cambrian formation’ ( letter to James Croll31 January [1869] …
  • have got that yet’ ( letter from James Croll, 4 February 1869 ).  Darwin did not directly

Darwin’s queries on expression

Summary

When Darwin resumed systematic research on emotions around 1866, he began to collect observations more widely and composed a list of queries on human expression. A number of handwritten copies were sent out in 1867 (see, for example, letter to Fritz Muller…

Matches: 25 hits

  • When Darwin resumed systematic research on emotions around 1866, he began to collect
  • handwritten copies were sent out in 1867 (see, for example, letter to Fritz Muller, 22 February
  • was the collection of observations on a global scale. Darwin was especially interested in peoples
  • cultural and conventional, or instinctive and universal. Darwin used his existing correspondence
  • and with the mouth a little drawn back at the corners?” Darwins questionnaire was an extension of
  • was also carefully devised so as to prevent the feelings of Darwins remote observers from colouring
  • Correspondence about Darwins Questionnaire (click on the letter dates to see the individual letters
  • Correspondent Letter date Location
  • Africa)? ] mentioned in JPM Weale letter, but Bowker's answers not found
  • Fuegians Brooke, C.A.J. 30 Nov 1870
  • Dyaks Brooke, C.A.J. 30 April 1871
  • Woolston, Southampton, England letter to W.E. Darwin shrugging
  • Crichton-Browne, James 20 May 1869 32 Queen Anne St. …
  • Unknown? comments from A.D. Bartlett and S. Sutton
  • South Africa possibly included in letter from Mansel Weale
  • Peradeniya, Ceylon enclosed in letter from G.H.K. Thwaites
  • Gray, Asa 9 May [1869] [Alexandria, Egypt] …
  • Gray, Jane 9 May [1869] [Alexandria, Egypt] …
  • Gray, Asa 8 & 9 May 1869 Florence, Italy (about
  • King, P.G. 25 Feb 1869 Sydney, Australia
  • aborigines Lubbock, E.F. [1867-8?] …
  • Maudsley, Henry 20 May 1869 32 Queen Anne St. …
  • from Dr. C. Browne Meyer, A.B. 25 April
  • Reade, Winwood W. 17 Jan 1869 Sierra Leone, Africa
  • Reade, Winwood W. 28 June [1869] Sierra Leone, …

Women’s scientific participation

Summary

Observers | Fieldwork | Experimentation | Editors and critics | Assistants Darwin’s correspondence helps bring to light a community of women who participated, often actively and routinely, in the nineteenth-century scientific community. Here is a…

Matches: 13 hits

  • … |  Editors and critics  |  Assistants Darwins correspondence helps bring to light a
  • Observers Women: Letter 1194 - Darwin to Whitby, M. A. T., [12 August
  • silkworm breeds, or peculiarities in inheritance. Letter 3787 - Darwin, H. E. to
  • to artificially fertilise plants in her garden. Letter 4523 - Wedgwood, L. C. to
  • be made on seeds of Pulmonaria officinalis . Letter 5745 - Barber, M. E. to
  • Expression from her home in South Africa. Letter 6736 - Gray, A. & J. L
  • January 1868] Darwin asks Thomas Huxley to pass on a questionnaire to his wife, Henrietta. …
  • 6535 - Vaughan Williams , M. S. to Darwin, H. E., [after 14 October 1869] Darwins
  • Letter 8611 - Cupples, A. J. to Darwin, E., [8 November1872] Anne Jane Cupples, …
  • her nieces ears. Letter 8701 - Lubbock, E. F . to Darwin, [1873] Ellen
  • insects. Men: Letter 2221 - Blyth, E. to Darwin, [22 February 1858] …
  • Letter 6815 - Scott, J. to Darwin, [2 July 1869] John Scott responds to Darwins
  • …  - Darwin to  Gunther, A. C. L. G., [21 September 1869] Darwin asks Gunther fora great

Women as a scientific audience

Summary

Target audience? | Female readership | Reading Variation Darwin's letters, in particular those exchanged with his editors and publisher, reveal a lot about his intended audience. Regardless of whether or not women were deliberately targeted as a…

Matches: 14 hits

  • … Female readership | Reading Variation Darwin's letters, in particular those …
  • … that his views are original and will appeal to the public. Darwin asks Murray to forward the …
  • … obscure, even after it had been proofread and edited by “a lady”. Darwin, E. to Darwin, W …
  • … her to read to check that she can understand it. Letter 7312 - Darwin to Darwin, F. …
  • … from all but educated, typically-male readers. Letter 7124 - Darwin to Darwin, H. E …
  • … he seeks her help with tone and style. Letter 7329 - Murray , J. to Darwin, [28 …
  • … in order to minimise impeding general perusal. Letter 7331 - Darwin to Murray, …
  • … he uses to avoid ownership of indelicate content. Letter 8335 - Reade, W. W. to …
  • Letter 8611 - Cupples, A. J. to Darwin, E., [8 November 1872] Ann Cupples asks …
  • … readership Letter 5391 - Becker, L. E. to Darwin, [6 February 1867] …
  • … Society . Letter 6551 - Becker, L. E . to Darwin, [13 January 1869] …
  • Letter 6976 - Darwin to Blackwell, A. L. B., [8 November, 1869] Darwin writes to feminist …
  • Letter 7651 - Wedgwood, F. J. to Darwin, H. E., [1 April 1871] Frances Wedgwood …
  • Letter 6551 - Becker, L. E . to Darwin, [13 January 1869] Suffragist and …

Darwin in letters,1870: Human evolution

Summary

The year 1870 is aptly summarised by the brief entry Darwin made in his journal: ‘The whole of the year at work on the Descent of Man & Selection in relation to Sex’.  Descent was the culmination of over three decades of observations and reflections on…

Matches: 17 hits

  • The year 1870 is aptly summarised by the brief entry Darwin made in his journal: ‘The whole of the
  • in relation to Sex’. Always precise in his accounting, Darwin reckoned that he had started writing
  • gathered on each of these topics was far more extensive than Darwin had anticipated. As a result,  …
  • and St George Jackson Mivart, and heated debates sparked by Darwins proposed election to the French
  • Lyell, ‘thank all the powers above & below, I shall be a man again & not a horrid grinding
  • anything which has happened to me for some weeks’  ( letter to Albert Günther, 13 January [1870] ) …
  • corrections of style, the more grateful I shall be’  ( letter to H. E. Darwin, [8 February 1870] ) …
  • … , the latter when she was just eighteen years of age. Darwin clearly expected her to make a
  • He worried that parts of the book weretoo like a Sermon: who wd ever have thought that I shd. turn
  • abt any thing so unimportant as the mind of man!’ ( letter from H. E. Darwin, [after 8 February
  • looking exclusively into his own mind’, and himself, ‘a degraded wretch looking from the outside
  • how metaphysics & physics form one great philosophy?’ ( letter from F. P. Cobbe, 28 March [1870
  • side of human descent. On 7 March 1870, Darwin made a note on the shape of human ears: ‘W. has seen
  • in thanks for the drawing ( Correspondence  vol. 16, letter to J. D. Hooker, 26 November [1868] …
  • vol. 17, letter to A. R. Wallace, 14 April 1869 ). His views were presented more fully in a
  • comparative anatomist through his work on primates. In July 1869, Mivart published the first of a
  • attending college lectures for the time being ( letter to [E.W. Blore], [October 1870 or later] ). …

Darwin in letters, 1874: A turbulent year

Summary

The year 1874 was one of consolidation, reflection, and turmoil for Darwin. He spent the early months working on second editions of Coral reefs and Descent of man; the rest of the year was mostly devoted to further research on insectivorous plants. A…

Matches: 17 hits

  • 1874 was one of consolidation, reflection, and turmoil for Darwin. He spent the early months working
  • mostly devoted to further research on insectivorous plants. A vicious dispute over an anonymous
  • and traveller Alexander von Humboldts 105th birthday, Darwin obliged with a reflection on his debt
  • one of the greatest men the world has ever produced. He gave a wonderful impetus to science by
  • pleasures of shooting and collecting beetles ( letter from W. D. Fox, 8 May [1874] ).  Such
  • Andone looks backwards much more than forwards’ ( letter to W. D. Fox, 11 May [1874] ). …
  • was an illusory hope.— I feel very old & helpless’  ( letter to B. J. Sulivan, 6 January [1874] …
  • inferred that he was well from his silence on the matter ( letter from Ernst Haeckel, 26 October
  • world. While Darwin was in London, his son George organised a séance at Erasmuss house. The event
  • in such rubbish’, he confided to Joseph Dalton Hooker ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 18 January [1874] …
  • William Henry Myers, and Thomas Henry Huxley, who sent a long report to Darwin with the spirit
  • all the horrid bother of correction’ ( letter to H. E. Litchfield, 21 [March 1874] ). The book
  • generous Darwin by his previous anonymous attacks ([Mivart] 1869; 1871c). In his review, Mivart
  • artificial gastric juice  for about a week ( letter from E. E. Klein, 14 May 1874 ). John Burdon
  • try to get it exhibited at a Royal Society of London soirée  (see letter from Anton Dohrn, 6 April
  • nephew, the fine-art specialist Henry Parker ( letter from E. A. Darwin, 17 [March 1874] ). He
  • Julius Victor Carus, and his publisher, Eduard Koch of E. Schweizerbartsche Verlagsbuchhandlung, …

Science: A Man’s World?

Summary

Discussion Questions|Letters Darwin's correspondence show that many nineteenth-century women participated in the world of science, be it as experimenters, observers, editors, critics, producers, or consumers. Despite this, much of the…

Matches: 10 hits

  • Discussion Questions | Letters Darwin's correspondence show that many nineteenth
  • Letters Darwins Notes On Marriage [April - July 1838] In these notes, …
  • theories, & accumulating facts in silence & solitude”. Darwin also comments that he has
  • an hourwith poor Mrs. Lyell sitting by”. Letter 3715 - Claparède, J. L. R. A. E. to
  • Self-taught insemi-masculine education”, Royer is asingular individual whose attractions are not
  • she has read Lamarcks work under her own steam and is afirst rate critic”. Letter 4377
  • ornaments in the making of feminine works”. Letter 4441 - Becker, L. E. to Darwin, [30
  • the young, especially ladies, to study nature. Letter 4940 - Cresy, E. to Darwin, E., …
  • Anderson isneither masculine nor pedantic”. Letter 6976 - Darwin to Blackwell, A. B., …
  • to women. Letter 10746Darwin to Dicey, E. M., [1877] Darwin gives his

Darwin in letters, 1863: Quarrels at home, honours abroad

Summary

At the start of 1863, Charles Darwin was actively working on the manuscript of The variation of animals and plants under domestication, anticipating with excitement the construction of a hothouse to accommodate his increasingly varied botanical experiments…

Matches: 14 hits

  • At the start of 1863, Charles Darwin was actively working on the manuscript of  The variation of
  • … , anticipating with excitement the construction of a hothouse to accommodate his increasingly varied
  • am languid & bedeviled … & hate everybody’. Although Darwin did continue his botanical
  • the correspondence from the year. These letters illustrate Darwins preoccupation with the
  • Evidence as to mans place in nature  both had a direct bearing on Darwins species theory and on
  • fromsome Quadrumanum animal’, as he put it in a letter to J. D. Hooker of 24[–5] February [1863] …
  • detailed anatomical similarities between humans and apes, Darwin was full of praise. He especially
  • … ‘I declare I never in my life read anything grander’ ( letter to T. H. Huxley, 26 [February 1863] …
  • in expressing any judgment on Species or origin of man’. Darwins concern about the popular
  • than  Origin had (see  Correspondence  vol. 8, letter to Charles Lyell, 10 January [1860] ). …
  • from animals like the woolly mammoth and cave bear ( see letter from Jacques Boucher de Perthes, 23
  • seen how indignant all Owens lies and mean conduct about E. Columbi made me… . The case is come to
  • Copley Medal had been unsuccessful ( see letter from E. A. Darwin to Emma Darwin, 11 November [1863
  • the bookcase and around the head of the sofa ( letter to W. E. Darwin, [25 July 1863], and

Race, Civilization, and Progress

Summary

Darwin's first reflections on human progress were prompted by his experiences in the slave-owning colony of Brazil, and by his encounters with the Yahgan peoples of Tierra del Fuego. Harsh conditions, privation, poor climate, bondage and servitude,…

Matches: 22 hits

  • Letters | Selected Readings Darwin's first reflections on human progress were
  • human progress or cause degeneration. In the "Fuegians", Darwin thought he had witnessed
  • homeland by Robert FitzRoy several years earlier as part of a missionary enterprise. Darwin was
  • been returned to their native land. After the voyage, Darwin began to question the
  • toward increased complexity and variety, he suggested, was a bi-product of the abundance of life; …
  • After the publication of Origin of Species , many of Darwin's supporters continued to
  • or extermination of other peoples and cultures. When Darwin wrote about the human races and
  • on human and animal behavior accumulated over three decades. Darwin argued forcefully for the unity
  • moral powers. The "grade of civilization", he wrote, "seems a most important element
  • and beyond. Letters Darwins first observations of the peoples
  • of botany at Cambridge, John Stevens Henslow. Letter 204 : Darwin to Henslow, J. S., …
  • 1833 which took effect in the following year. Letter 206 : Darwin to Darwin, E. C., 22
  • shown at elections, has been rising against Slavery.— What a proud thing for England, if she is the
  • be altered; the only alteration I am aware of is forming a much higher estimate of the Negros
  • of the polygenist theory of human descent. Letter 4933 : Farrar, F. W. to Darwin, …
  • about the state of civilization of the natives. Letter 5617 , Darwin to Weale, J. P. M
  • wonderful fact in the progress of civilization" Letter 5722 , Weale, J. P. M. to
  • of Species , Darwin discussed his views on progress in a letter to Charles Lyell, insisting that
  • of life" ( Origin , 6 th ed, p. 98). Letter 2503 : Darwin, C. R. to Lyell, C
  • not profit it, there would be no advance.— " Letter 6728 : from Charles Lyell, 5
  • Letter 6866 : From Federico Delpino, 22 August 1869 "Perhaps because of intellectual
  • Primary Charles Darwin, Notebooks, B 18-29; E 95-7 [ available at Darwinonline ] …

Darwin in letters, 1871: An emptying nest

Summary

The year 1871 was an extremely busy and productive one for Darwin, with the publication in February of his long-awaited book on human evolution, Descent of man. The other main preoccupation of the year was the preparation of his manuscript on expression.…

Matches: 24 hits

  • The year 1871 was an extremely busy and productive one for Darwin, seeing the publication of his
  • the whole of the confounded book out of my head’. But  a large proportion of Darwins time for the
  • way, and the initial reception of the book in the press. Darwin fielded numerous letters from
  • offered sharp criticism or even condemnation. Darwin had expected controversy. ‘I shall be
  • … , ‘for as my son Frank says, “you treat man in such a bare-faced manner.”‘ The most lively debate
  • taste. Correspondence with his readers and critics helped Darwin to clarify, and in some cases
  • year was the preparation of his manuscript on expression. Darwin continued to investigate the
  • of illustrating his book. The year  also brought a significant milestone for the family, as
  • … [of] the facts, during several past years, has been a great amusement’. Darwin had been working
  • in the late 1830s. In recent years, Darwin had collected a wealth of material on sexual selection
  • published on 24 February, and all 2500 copies were sold in a week. ‘Murray says he istorn to
  • three more printings, 2000 in March, 2000 in April, and a further 1000 in December. The level of
  • and the speed at which they appeared. Arrangements for a US edition had been in place since December
  • do to talk about it, which no doubt promotes the sale’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 26 March 1871 ) …
  • to her liking, ‘to keep in memory of the book’ ( letter to H. E. Darwin, 20 March 1871 ). …
  • and had forsaken his lunch and dinner in order to read it ( letter from James Crichton-Browne, 19
  • they believe to be the truth, whether pleasant or not’ (letter from W. W. Reade, 21 February 1871). …
  • and OldhamThey club together to buy them’ ( letter from W. B. Dawkins, 23 February 1871 ). …
  • ones n th . ancestor lived between tide-marks!’ ( letter from T. H. Huxley, 20 February 1871 ). …
  • habits, furnished with a tail and pointed ears”  (letter from Asa Gray, 14 April 1871) …
  • … ‘will-powerand the heavy use of their arms and legs ( letter from C. L. Bernays, 25 February 1871
  • a high aesthetic appreciation of beauty ( letter from E. J. Pfeiffer, [before 26 April 1871] ). …
  • most deep and tender religious feeling’ ( letter from F. E. Abbot, 20 August 1871 ). The Anglican
  • who wasas good as twice refined gold’ ( letter to H. E. Litchfield, 4 September [1871] ). …

Darwin in letters, 1864: Failing health

Summary

On receiving a photograph from Charles Darwin, the American botanist Asa Gray wrote on 11 July 1864: ‘the venerable beard gives the look of your having suffered, and … of having grown older’.  Because of poor health, Because of poor health, Darwin…

Matches: 20 hits

  • On receiving a photograph from Charles Darwin, the American botanist Asa Gray wrote on 11
  • … … of having grown older’. This portrait, the first of Darwin with his now famous beard, had been
  • of dimorphic plants with Williams help; he also ordered a selection of new climbing plants for his
  • 52 hours without vomiting!! In the same month, Darwin began to consult William Jenner, …
  • physician-in-ordinary to Queen Victoria. Jenner prescribed a variety of antacids and purgatives, and
  • the dimorphic aquatic cut-grass  Leersia . In May, Darwin finished his paper on  Lythrum
  • continued throughout the summer. When he finished a preliminary draft of his paper on climbing
  • and he received more letters of advice from Jenner. In a letter of 15 December [1864] to the
  • As Darwin explained to his cousin William Darwin Fox in a letter of 30 November [1864] , ‘the
  • arose over the grounds on which it was conferred, brought a dramatic conclusion to the year. Darwin
  • observations indoors ( Correspondence  vol. 11). In a letter of [27 January 1864] , Darwin
  • gradation by which  leaves  produce tendrils’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [8 February 1864] ). …
  • fearfully for it is a leaf climber & therefore sacred’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 2 June [1864] …
  • matters which routinists regard in the light of axioms’ ( letter from Daniel Oliver, [17 March 1864
  • long series of changes . . .’ When he told Asa Gray in a letter of 29 October [1864] that he was
  • …  paper was published, Darwin remarked to Hooker in a letter of 26 November [1864] that nothing
  • Menyanthes  ( letter from Emma and Charles Darwin to W. E. Darwin, [20 May 1864] ), or his
  • on them. Nevertheless, his work in 1864 contributed to his 1869 paper focusing on the role of
  • circulating with the 1864 subscription fund ( letter from E. A. Darwin, 1 February [1864] ). …
  • … … & too light to turn into candlesticks’ ( letter from E. A. Darwin, 1 December 1864 ). …

Darwin in letters, 1868: Studying sex

Summary

The quantity of Darwin’s correspondence increased dramatically in 1868 due largely to his ever-widening research on human evolution and sexual selection.Darwin’s theory of sexual selection as applied to human descent led him to investigate aspects of the…

Matches: 14 hits

  • …   On 6 March 1868, Darwin wrote to the entomologist and accountant John Jenner Weir, ‘If any
  • and sexual selection. In  Origin , pp. 8790, Darwin had briefly introduced the concept of
  • or in satisfying female preference in the mating process. In a letter to Alfred Russel Wallace in
  • to the stridulation of crickets. At the same time, Darwin continued to collect material on
  • his immediate circle of friends and relations. In July 1868 Darwin was still anticipating that his
  • which was devoted to sexual selection in the animal kingdom. Darwin described his thirst for
  • early as 1865, the two-volume work appeared in January 1868. A final delay caused by the indexing
  • would be a great loss to the Book’. But Darwins angry letter to Murray crossed one from Dallas to
  • of labour to remuneration I shall look rather blank’ ( letter from W. S. Dallas, 8 January 1868 ). …
  • if I try to read a few pages feel fairly nauseated’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 3 February [1868] ). …
  • reviews. On 7 August 1868 , he wrote him a lengthy letter from the Isle of Wight on the formation
  • would strike me in the face, but not behind my back’ ( letter to John Murray, 25 February [1868] ) …
  • and had himself watched elephants cry (letters to W. E. Darwin, [15 March 1868] and 8 April
  • paper was read before the Linnean Society on 4 February 1869, but remained unpublished until it

Darwin's in letters, 1873: Animal or vegetable?

Summary

Having laboured for nearly five years on human evolution, sexual selection, and the expression of emotions, Darwin was able to devote 1873 almost exclusively to his beloved plants. He resumed work on the digestive powers of sundews and Venus fly traps, and…

Matches: 20 hits

  • evolution, sexual selection, and the expression of emotions, Darwin was able to devote 1873 almost
  • … (1875) and  Cross and self fertilisation  (1876). Darwins son Francis became increasingly
  • the previous year. As was typical, readers wrote to Darwin personally to offer suggestions, …
  • Francis Galtons work on inherited talent, which prompted Darwin to reflect on the traits and
  • Station at Naples. Plants that eat and feel? Darwin had resumed experiments on the
  • I omitted to observe, which I ought to have observed” ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 12 January [1873] …
  • and even electrical stimulation. On sending Darwin a specimen of the carnivorous  Drosophyllum
  • work your wicked will on itroot leaf & branch!” ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 12 January 1873 ) …
  • tentacles to bend inward, so that the plant closed like a fist. Darwin was fascinated by this
  • seemed analogous to muscular contraction in animals: “a nerve is toucheda sensation is felt” ( …
  • parts of the flower would become modified & correlated” ( letter to T. H. Farrer, 14 August
  • it again, “for Heaven knows when it will be ready” ( letter to John Murray, 4 May [1873] ). …
  • assistance from his son Francis. While visiting his fiancée, Amy Ruck, in Wales, Francis observed
  • we take notes and take tracings of their burrows” ( letter from Francis Darwin, 14 August [1873] ) …
  • in importance; and if so more places will be created” ( letter to E. A. Darwin, 20 September 1873
  • our unfortunate family being fit for continuous work” ( letter from E. A. Darwin, 25 September
  • on any point; for I knew my own ignorance before hand” ( letter to George Cupples, 28 April [1873] …
  • throat like a bulldog” ( letter from L. M. Forster to H. E. Litchfield, 20 February 1873 ). The
  • line of research he had begun with  Hereditary genius  (1869), Galton tried to establish the
  • we should feel it a privilege to offer” ( letter from E. F. Lubbock, [before 7 April 1873] ). …

Moral Nature

Summary

In Descent of Man, Darwin argued that human morality had evolved from the social instincts of animals, especially the bonds of sympathy and love. Darwin gathered observations over many decades on animal behavior: the heroic sacrifices of social insects,…

Matches: 21 hits

  • … | Selected Readings In Descent of Man , Darwin argued that human morality had …
  • … instincts, and perhaps others.... These instincts consist of a feeling of love & sympathy or …
  • … (Barrett et al. eds. 1987, p. 619) Darwin gathered observations over many decades on …
  • … regard for others were beneficial to animal communities as a whole, and helped them to survive in …
  • … the social instincts that humans shared with animals. Darwin's moral theory was the most …
  • … obligation, compassion, guilt, and the pangs of conscience. Darwin's theory was condemned by …
  • … female members of their hive in order to protect the queen. Darwin engaged with his critics in …
  • … save another. Letters Letter 7048 : Darwin, W. E., to Darwin, …
  • … the result of association and depending upon intellect to a great extent. It is very extraordinary …
  • … allowing the moral faculty to be inheritable, but rather in a muddle on the whole subject" …
  • … (Morley 1871). Darwin admired the review, and initiated a correspondence about the power of natural …
  • … wh. belong of right to what I should call Social Selection--i.e., the selection by a community, …
  • … but 'in the air' from generation to generation." Letter 7685 : Darwin to …
  • … think that there is any evidence that man ever existed as a non-social animal." …
  • … the moral sense, at a time when Paris is aflame". Letter 7145 : Darwin to Cobbe, F. …
  • … writer and social reformer Frances Power Cobbe in Wales in 1869, and she recommended that he read …
  • … apes & savages at the moral sense of mankind." Letter 7149 : Cobbe, F. P. to …
  • … metaphysics & physics form one great philosophy?" Letter 7470 : Wedgwood, …
  • … which look with reverence or respect is shame." Letter 7537 : Darwin, C. R. to …
  • Letter 9377 : Darwin, C. R. to Abbott, F. E. A., 30 March 1874 Writing to the American …
  • … H. 1974. 'Early writings of Charles Darwin', in Gruber, H. E., Darwin on man. A …

Was Darwin an ecologist?

Summary

One of the most fascinating aspects of Charles Darwin’s correspondence is the extent to which the experiments he performed at his home in Down, in the English county of Kent, seem to prefigure modern scientific work in ecology.

Matches: 20 hits

  • I gave two seeds to a confounded old cock, but his gizzard ground them up; at least I cd. not find
  • merely by birds accidentally dropping them. The case is a sore puzzle to me.— Charles
  • or regurgitated by birds with non-muscular gizzards (e.g. toucans) would have lower germination
  • One of the most fascinating aspects of Charles Darwins correspondence is the extent to which the
  • work in ecology. Despite the difference in language between Darwins letter and the modern
  • in seeds that have no nutritive value. Other subjects that Darwin worked on at Down also have
  • from the ones we tend to take for granted today. Ecology as a discipline did not then exist: even
  • was becoming well enough established in universities that Darwinsheld together with a piece of
  • explained’ (quoted in Chadarevian 1996, pp. 1718). As a gentleman amateur, observing his
  • and at the same time also challenged the notion that only a laboratory could serve as the place in
  • tradition in the field. Modern ecology A great deal is wrapped up in our modern idea
  • which draws on the other three strands just mentioned, is a broadly based political movement which
  • daresay very well, & for coining new words.’  See the letter The word first appeared
  • of the struggle for existence’ (Inaugural lecture 1869; translation by W. C. Allee quoted in
  • for atheism, but as Darwin himself acknowledged in a letter to Mary Boole, it was more satisfactory
  • as a result of the direct intervention of GodSee the letter We may contrast Darwins
  • sucks it, must have! It is a very pretty case.’  See the letter Darwin was confident
  • nature as she really is.’ It seems from Haeckels letter that what most struck him about
  • of his great discovery is by contrast extremely modest. In a letter written in 1864 and
  • Natürliche Schöpfungsgeschichte . Translation revised by E. Ray Lankester. 2 vols. London: Henry S. …

Darwin and the Church

Summary

The story of Charles Darwin’s involvement with the church is one that is told far too rarely. It shows another side of the man who is more often remembered for his personal struggles with faith, or for his role in large-scale controversies over the…

Matches: 17 hits

  • The story of Charles Darwins involvement with the church is one that is told far too rarely. It
  • religion. His local activities in the village of Down paint a fascinating picture of a man who, …
  • were comparatively small, well-educated, and allowed for a greater variance of belief (and doubt) …
  • to belong to that institution (Autobiography 75). A nominal adherence to the Anglican Churchs
  • the necessary studies to be a clergyman. During Darwins lifetime, the vast majority of the
  • income was essential to enjoy a gentlemanly lifestyle. For Darwin, who could rely on the financial
  • compatible with the pursuit of scientific interests. Indeed, Darwins Cambridge mentorJohn Stevens
  • … (Blackwoods Edinburgh Magazine (1887): 321). Darwin started on his journey around the world
  • … & I can see it even through a grove of Palms.—’ (letter to Caroline Darwin, 256 April [1832] …
  • wrote to the contrary: ‘I am sorry to see in your last letter that you still look forward to the
  • near the British Museum or some other learned place’ (letter from E. A. Darwin, 18 August [1832] …
  • it is a sort of scene I never ought to think about—’ (letter to W. D. Fox, [912 August] 1835 ). …
  • from the late 1830s, and in correspondence with his fiancéeEmma Wedgwood, in 1838 and 1839, as can
  • However, what remains is cordial; in the first extant letter of the correspondence, Darwin wrote to
  • Fund (a local charity), which he administered from 1848 to 1869 (letter to J. B. Innes, [8 May
  • he would make an excellent Guardian [of the Poor Fund]’ (letter to J. W. Lubbock, 28 March [1854] …
  • Victorian clergy. London: Croom Helm. Keppel, T. E. 1887. The country parson as he was, and as

Lydia Becker

Summary

Becker was a leading member of the suffrage movement, perhaps best known for publishing the Women’s Suffrage Journal. She was also a successful biologist, astronomer and botanist and, between 1863 and 1877, an occasional correspondent of Charles Darwin. …

Matches: 6 hits

  • Becker was a leading member of the suffrage movement, perhaps best known for publishing the  Women
  • to publish her articles. Perhaps most surprising was Darwins willingness to provide Becker
  • Literary Society. On December 22nd 1866 Becker wrote to Darwin to ask if he wouldbe so very
  • continued, “but I think it possible you may have by you a copy of some paper such as that on the  …
  • inaccessible to us unless through your kindness.” Darwin responded by sending not one but
  • … `Three forms of Lythrum salicaria ‘) . Whether Darwin realised that he was providing