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Darwin in letters, 1868: Studying sex

Summary

The quantity of Darwin’s correspondence increased dramatically in 1868 due largely to his ever-widening research on human evolution and sexual selection.Darwin’s theory of sexual selection as applied to human descent led him to investigate aspects of the…

Matches: 24 hits

  • …   On 6 March 1868, Darwin wrote to the entomologist and accountant John Jenner Weir, ‘If any
  • he ought to do what I am doing pester them with letters.’ Darwin was certainly true to his word. The
  • and sexual selection. In  Origin , pp. 8790, Darwin had briefly introduced the concept of
  • process. In a letter to Alfred Russel Wallace in 1864, Darwin claimed that sexual selection wasthe
  • 12, letter to A. R. Wallace, 28 [May 1864] ). Darwins theory of sexual selection as
  • to the stridulation of crickets. At the same time, Darwin continued to collect material on
  • and his immediate circle of friends and relations. In July 1868 Darwin was still anticipating that
  • which was devoted to sexual selection in the animal kingdom. Darwin described his thirst for
  • and not too much’ ( letter to Albert Günther, 15 May [1868] ). My book is horribly
  • as early as 1865, the two-volume work appeared in January 1868. A final delay caused by the indexing
  • 1867 and had expected to complete it in a fortnight. But at Darwins request, he modified his
  • look rather blank’ ( letter from W. S. Dallas, 8 January 1868 ). Darwin sympathised, replying on
  • fairly nauseated’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 3 February [1868] ). But such worries were laid to
  • was clearly impressed by Lewess reviews. On 7 August 1868 , he wrote him a lengthy letter from
  • not behind my back’ ( letter to John Murray, 25 February [1868] ). Wallace commiserated: ‘I am
  • to the paper’ ( letter from A. R. Wallace, 24 February [1868] ). The review was in fact by John
  • a veritable ass’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 1 September [1868] ). I am bothered with
  • Yorkshire, wrote of the colour of duck claws on 17 April 1868 . The letter was addressed tothe
  • classes, a dim ray of light may be gained’ ( letter to H. T. Stainton, 21 February [1868] ). From
  • of the caudicle of  Ophrys muscifera  (letters from T. H. Farrer, 17 May 1868 and 18 May
  • to oneselfis no slight gain’ ( letter from T. H. Farrer, 17 September 1868 ). Darwin continued
  • induced him to stay away ( letter from S. J. OH. Horsman, 2 June [1868] ). But if Horsman
  • at the shrine of D r . Darwin’ ( letter from T. H. Huxley, 20 July 1868 ). Darwin received a
  • and evenpreached  against’ ( letter from G. D. Hinrichs, [before 13 August 1868] ). Finally, …

Darwin’s queries on expression

Summary

When Darwin resumed systematic research on emotions around 1866, he began to collect observations more widely and composed a list of queries on human expression. A number of handwritten copies were sent out in 1867 (see, for example, letter to Fritz Muller…

Matches: 23 hits

  • When Darwin resumed systematic research on emotions around 1866, he began to collect
  • for ease of distribution sometime in late 1867 or early 1868. Darwin went over his questions, …
  • was the collection of observations on a global scale. Darwin was especially interested in peoples
  • cultural and conventional, or instinctive and universal. Darwin used his existing correspondence
  • and with the mouth a little drawn back at the corners?” Darwins questionnaire was an extension of
  • was also carefully devised so as to prevent the feelings of Darwins remote observers from colouring
  • in Ceylon, wrote the botanist George Thwaites on 22 July 1868 , “all endeavour to drill their
  • Scottish botanist John Scott wrote from Calcutta, 4 May 1868 : “Shame isexpressed by an
  • and not the susceptibilities of a moral nature.” Darwin did not typically countenance such
  • the collection of information to its display in print. After Darwin received all of the replies to
  • Bulmer, J 13 Aug 1868 [Gipps Land, nr. Flemington? …
  • Bunnett, Templeton 13 Aug 1868 Echuca, Australia
  • Darwin, W.E. [after 29 March 1868] Chester Place, …
  • Darwin, W.E. [7? April 1868] Southampton, England
  • Darwin, W.E. [22? April 1868] Southampton, England
  • Forbes, David 26 March 1868 Boulton, England (about
  • Geach, F.F. April 1868 Johore, Malaysia
  • Glenie, S.O. 22 July 1868 Peradeniya, Ceylon
  • will forward query Huxley, H.A. 22 Mar
  • Aborigines Lane, H.B. 13 Aug 1868
  • head forward Mivart, G.J. 26 Jan 1871
  • aborigines Thwaites, G.H.K. 1 Apr 1868
  • Kanara), Bombay, India forwarded by H.N.B. Erskine

5935_4582

Summary

From J. D. Hooker   26[–7] February 1868KewFeby 26th/68Dear Darwin I have been bursting with impatience to hear what you would say of the Athenæum Review & who wrote it— I could not conceive who…

Matches: 8 hits

  • From JDHooker   26[–7] February 1868 Kew Feby 26 th /68 Dear Darwin
  • Journal hascovered itself with infamy”.— The GCarticle is weak, wateryIt is hard to
  • please return it.—as I have no time to copy it.— J H. CD
  • to Richard Owen (see letter to JDHooker, 23 February [1868]); the review was by John Robertson ( …
  • 1867) was reviewed in the Athenæum , 8 February 1868, pp21718. f3 CD had discussed
  • CDs reply. See letter to JDHooker, 28 February [1868] and nn810. …
  • Letter details From Hooker, J. D. To Darwin, C. R. Sent from Kew
  • J. D. Hooker, J. D. Hooker, J. D. Huxley, T. H. Owen, Richard Scientific

Women’s scientific participation

Summary

Observers | Fieldwork | Experimentation | Editors and critics | Assistants Darwin’s correspondence helps bring to light a community of women who participated, often actively and routinely, in the nineteenth-century scientific community. Here is a…

Matches: 23 hits

  • … |  Editors and critics  |  Assistants Darwins correspondence helps bring to light a
  • community. Here is a selection of letters exchanged between Darwin and his workforce of women
  • Women: Letter 1194 - Darwin to Whitby, M. A. T., [12 August 1849] Darwin
  • peculiarities in inheritance. Letter 3787 - Darwin, H. E. to Darwin, [29 October
  • garden. Letter 4523 - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, [6 June 1864] Darwins
  • birds. Letter 5817 - Darwin to Huxley, T. H., [30 January 1868] Darwin
  • Letter 6535 - Vaughan Williams , M. S. to Darwin, H. E., [after 14 October 1869] …
  • patience”. Letter 4242 - Hildebrand, F. H. G. to Darwin, [16 July 1863] …
  • 6453 - Langton, E. to Wedgwood, S. E., [9 November 1868] Darwins nephew, Edmund, …
  • … - Langton, E. & C. to Wedgwood S. E., [after 9 November 1868] Darwins nephews, Edmund
  • Women: Letter 1701 - Morris, M. H. to Prior, R. C. A., [17 June 1855] …
  • Letter 4823  - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, H. E., [May 1865] Darwins niece, Lucy, …
  • Leith Hill Place. Letter 6139  - Doubleday, H. to Darwin, [22 April 1868] …
  • Letter 8168 - Ruck, A. R . to Darwin, H., [20 January 1872] Amy Ruck reports the
  • for more samples. Letter 4928  - Henslow, G. to Darwin, [11 November 1865] …
  • … “eyebrows”. Letter 1701  - Morris, M. H. to Prior, R. C. A., [17 June 1855] …
  • Letter 5254  - Hildebrand, F. H. G. to Darwin, [23 October 1866] German botanist
  • Letter 6046  - Weir, J. J. to Darwin, [24 March 1868] John Weir describes experiments
  • Letter 6083  - Casparay, J. X. R. to Darwin, [2 April 1868] Casparay details his
  • Letter 6139  - Doubleday, H. to Darwin, [22 April 1868] Naturalist Henry Doubleday
  • job. Letter 9157  - Darwin to Da rwin, G. H., [20 November 1873] Darwin
  • Letter 6046  - Weir, J. J. to Darwin, [24 March 1868] John Weir describes experiments
  • Letter 6066  - Weir, H. W. to Darwin, [28 March 1868] Harrison Weir passes on

Women as a scientific audience

Summary

Target audience? | Female readership | Reading Variation Darwin's letters, in particular those exchanged with his editors and publisher, reveal a lot about his intended audience. Regardless of whether or not women were deliberately targeted as a…

Matches: 13 hits

  • … Female readership | Reading Variation Darwin's letters, in particular those …
  • … a broad variety of women had access to, and engaged with, Darwin's published works. A set of …
  • … women a target audience? Letter 2447 - Darwin to Murray, J., [5 April 1859] …
  • … that his views are original and will appeal to the public. Darwin asks Murray to forward the …
  • … and criticisms of style. Letter 2461 - Darwin to Hooker, J. D., [11 May 1859] …
  • … typically-male readers. Letter 7124 - Darwin to Darwin, H. E., [8 February 1870] …
  • … Letter 5861 - Blyth, E. to Darwin, [11 February 1868] Zoologist Edward Blyth sends …
  • … Letter 5928 - Gray, A. to Darwin, [25 February 1868] American naturalist Asa Gray …
  • … Letter 6040 - Haeckel, E. P. A. to Darwin, [23 March 1868] Haeckel informs Darwin …
  • … Letter 6110 - Samuelson, J. to Darwin, [10 April 1868] James Samuel, editor of …
  • … Variation . Letter 6126 - Binstead, C. H. to Darwin, [17 April 1868] …
  • … Letter 6237 - Bullar, R. to Darwin, [9 June 1868] Rosa Bullar reports a case of a …
  • … Letter 6335 - Innes, J. B. to Darwin, [31 August 1868] John Innes reports that he has …

Darwin and the Church

Summary

The story of Charles Darwin’s involvement with the church is one that is told far too rarely. It shows another side of the man who is more often remembered for his personal struggles with faith, or for his role in large-scale controversies over the…

Matches: 24 hits

  • The story of Charles Darwins involvement with the church is one that is told far too rarely. It
  • unique window into this complicated relationship throughout Darwins life, as it reveals his
  • belief (and doubt) than many non-conformist denominations. Darwins parents attended a Unitarian
  • the necessary studies to be a clergyman. During Darwins lifetime, the vast majority of the
  • income was essential to enjoy a gentlemanly lifestyle. For Darwin, who could rely on the financial
  • compatible with the pursuit of scientific interests. Indeed, Darwins Cambridge mentorJohn Stevens
  • … (Blackwoods Edinburgh Magazine (1887): 321). Darwin started on his journey around the world
  • it even through a grove of Palms.—’ (letter to Caroline Darwin, 256 April [1832] ). Darwins
  • Museum or some other learned place’ (letter from E. A. Darwin, 18 August [1832] ). Writing to Fox
  • about—’ (letter to W. D. Fox, [912 August] 1835 ). Darwins doubts about orthodox belief, and
  • in 1838 and 1839, as can be read here. In the end, Darwin chose a middle coursea life of ease in
  • within six years of his return from the  Beagle  voyage, Darwin moved to Down House, in the
  • where their children Mary and Charles were buried; later Darwins brother Erasmus, Emmas sister
  • of Emma, whose religious scruples are discussed here. But Darwins correspondence reveals his own
  • Although he was not the principal landowner in Down, Darwin was a gentleman of means, and clearly
  • made inroads on Anglican authority in the countryside. The Darwin family took an interest in, and
  • Many of the letters highlighted in this section focus on Darwins long-standing relationship with
  • To the end of his life Innes refused to be persuaded by Darwins theory of evolution, but
  • cordial; in the first extant letter of the correspondence, Darwin wrote to Innes expressing concern
  • a cow and a red deer (letter from J. B. Innes, 7 December 1868 ). Innes had a tendency to tease
  • complications he left behind (letter from S. J. OH. Horsman, 2 June [1868] ). Among the reasons
  • the churchs organ fund (letter to J. B. Innes, 15 June [1868] ). So embroiled in this process
  • the Down parish church (letter to J. B. Innes, 1 December 1868 ). Darwin wrote of the next
  • Press in association with Nova Pacifica. Paz, D. G., ed. 1995Nineteenth-century English

Darwin in letters,1870: Human evolution

Summary

The year 1870 is aptly summarised by the brief entry Darwin made in his journal: ‘The whole of the year at work on the Descent of Man & Selection in relation to Sex’.  Descent was the culmination of over three decades of observations and reflections on…

Matches: 22 hits

  • The year 1870 is aptly summarised by the brief entry Darwin made in his journal: ‘The whole of the
  • in relation to Sex’. Always precise in his accounting, Darwin reckoned that he had started writing
  • gathered on each of these topics was far more extensive than Darwin had anticipated. As a result,  …
  • and St George Jackson Mivart, and heated debates sparked by Darwins proposed election to the French
  • Finishing Descent; postponing Expression Darwin began receiving proofs of some of the
  • … ( letter to Albert Günther, 13 January [1870] ). Darwin was still working hard on parts of the
  • of style, the more grateful I shall be’  ( letter to H. E. Darwin, [8 February 1870] ). She had
  • … , the latter when she was just eighteen years of age. Darwin clearly expected her to make a
  • ever have thought that I shd. turn parson?’ ( letter to H. E. Darwin, [8 February 1870] ). …
  • thing so unimportant as the mind of man!’ ( letter from H. E. Darwin, [after 8 February 1870] ). …
  • the folded margin. Darwin, who had posed for the sculptor in 1868, an experience he described as
  • vol. 16, letter to J. D. Hooker, 26 November [1868] ; this volume, letter to Thomas Woolner, 10
  • is to criticise them? No one but yourself’ ( letter from H. W. Bates, 20 May 1870 ). Darwin very
  • able to say that I  never  write reviews’ ( letter to H. W. Bates, [22 May 1870] ). St
  • if I once began to answer objectors’ ( letter to W. H. Flower, 25 March [1870] ). In his letters
  • … & valuable labours on the Primates’ ( letter to St G. J. Mivart, 23 April [1870] ). He also
  • an Ape differs from a lump of granite’ ( letter from St G. J. Mivart, 22 April 1870 ). …
  • whatever may have been hisorigin” ( letter from St G. J. Mivart, 25 April 1870 ). In his
  • out seven devils worse than that first!’ ( letter from T. H. Huxley, 22 June 1870 ). In the
  • highly important for the welfare of mankind’ ( letter to [H. H. Vivian?], [April or May 1870?] ). …
  • dark to me and to every one else I suspect’ ( letter from H. B. Jones, 2 August 1870 ). …
  • to ride the same horse that had thrown him (letter from G. H. Darwin to H. E. Darwin, [212

Natural Science and Femininity

Summary

Discussion Questions|Letters A conflation of masculine intellect and feminine thoughts, habits and feelings, male naturalists like Darwin inhabited an uncertain gendered identity. Working from the private domestic comfort of their homes and exercising…

Matches: 14 hits

  • thoughts, habits and feelings, male naturalists like Darwin inhabited an uncertain gendered identity
  • feminine powers of feeling and aesthetic appreciation, Darwin and his male colleagues struggled to
  • Letters Letter 109 - Wedgwood, J. to Darwin, R. W., [31 August 1831] Darwin
  • professional work on his return. Letter 158 - Darwin to Darwin, R. W., [8 & 26
  • and taking in the aesthetic beauty of the world around him. Darwin describes thestrikingcolour
  • and walks into town with Emma. Letter 555 - Darwin to FitzRoy, R., [20 February 1840] …
  • of an Infant ’. Letter 2781 - Doubleday, H. to Darwin, [3 May 1860] Doubleday
  • borders of his garden. Letter 2864 - Darwin to Hooker, J. D., [12 July 1860] …
  • saw anything so beautiful”. Letter 4230 - Darwin to GardenersChronicle, [2 July 1863] …
  • brought into the house immediately after a rain storm. Here, Darwins scientific investigation is
  • more than this. Letter 6044 - Darwin to Darwin, G. H., [24 March 1868] Darwin
  • Letter 6046 - Weir, J. J. to Darwin, [24 March 1868] John Weir describes experiments he
  • pretty garden ”. Letter 6139 - Doubleday, H. to Darwin, [22 April 1868] …
  • Letter 6453 - Langton, E. to Wedgwood, S. E., [9 November 1868] Darwins nephew, Edmund, …

Darwin in letters, 1879: Tracing roots

Summary

Darwin spent a considerable part of 1879 in the eighteenth century. His journey back in time started when he decided to publish a biographical account of his grandfather Erasmus Darwin to accompany a translation of an essay on Erasmus’s evolutionary ideas…

Matches: 23 hits

  • There are summaries of all Darwin's letters from the year 1879 on this website.  The full texts
  • 27 of the print edition of The correspondence of Charles Darwin , published by Cambridge
  • to publish a biographical account of his grandfather Erasmus Darwin to accompany a translation of an
  • the sensitivity of the tips. Despite this breakthrough, when Darwin first mentioned the book to his
  • 1879 ). He was also unsatisfied with his account of Erasmus Darwin, declaring, ‘My little biography
  • a holiday in the Lake District in August did little to raise Darwins spirits. ‘I wish that my
  • W. T. Thiselton-Dyer, [after 26] July [1879] ). From July, Darwin had an additional worry: the
  • that his grandfather had felt the same way. In 1792, Erasmus Darwin had written: ‘The worst thing I
  • contained a warmer note and the promise of future happiness: Darwin learned he was to be visited by
  • Hacon, 31 December 1879 ). Seventy years old Darwins seventieth birthday on 12
  • the veteran of Modern Zoology’, but it was in Germany that Darwin was most fêted. A German
  • … ). The masters of Greiz College in Thuringia venerated Darwin asthe deep thinker’, while
  • accepted in Germany. ‘On this festive day’, Haeckel told Darwin, ‘you can look back, with justified
  • with the when & the where, & the who—’ ( letter from V. H. Darwin, 28 May [1879] ). On the
  • tastefully and well, and with little fatigue’ ( letter to G. H. Darwin, 12 July 1879 , and
  • to W. T. Thiselton-Dyer, 5 June 1879 , and letter to G. H. Darwin, 12 July 1879 ). Darwins
  • and Farrer had corresponded on scientific topics since 1868 and after Farrers second marriage to
  • wait for three months. ‘Nothing can be more useless than T.Hs conduct’, Emma Darwin pointed out, …
  • to get home ‘& began drumming at once’ (Emma Darwin to H. E. Litchfield, [27 August 1879] (DAR
  • … & I may not be equal to the exertion’ ( letter to H. A. Pitman, [13 May 1879] ). In the end, …
  • because it dominated the picture (letter from Emma Darwin to H. E. Litchfield, [17 July 1879] (DAR
  • and his family to the Riviera for the summer ( letter to G. J. Romanes, 23 July 1879 ). Allen, who
  • to their engagement being made public ( letter from T. H. Farrer, 12 October 1879 ). Darwins

Darwin in letters, 1876: In the midst of life

Summary

1876 was the year in which the Darwins became grandparents for the first time.  And tragically lost their daughter-in-law, Amy, who died just days after her son's birth.  All the letters from 1876 are now published in volume 24 of The Correspondence…

Matches: 21 hits

  • The year 1876 started out sedately enough with Darwin working on the first draft of his book on the
  • games. ‘I have won, hurrah, hurrah, 2795 games’, Darwin boasted; ‘my wifepoor creature, has won
  • regarding the ailments that were so much a feature of Darwin family life. But the calm was not to
  • four days later. ‘I cannot bear to think of the future’, Darwin confessed to William on 11
  • once, the labour of checking proofs proved a blessing, as Darwin sought solace for the loss of his
  • and his baby son Bernard now part of the household, and Darwin recasting his work on dimorphic and
  • had involved much time and effort the previous year, and Darwin clearly wanted to focus his
  • When Smith, Elder and Company proposed reissuing two of Darwins three volumes of the geology of
  • single-volume edition titled Geological observations , Darwin resisted making any revisions at
  • volume, Coral reefs , already in its second edition. Darwin was neverthelessfirmly resolved not
  • expressed in the pangenesis hypothesis, first published in 1868 ( Variation 2: 357404). Others
  • results in this years experiments’ ( letter from G. J. Romanes, [ c . 19 March 1876] ). A less
  • Encyclopaedia Britannica the previous year ( letter to G. H. Darwin, [after 4 September 1876] ). …
  • theawful jobof informing the author ( letter to G. G. Stokes, 21 April [1876] ). Darwin could
  • … ‘all I can say is do not commit suicide’ ( letter to G. H. Darwin, [4 June 1876] ). By midsummer, …
  • a set of sons I have, all doing wonders.’ ( Letter to G. H. Darwin, 13 July [1876]. ) A
  • and eczema, was able to rest his mind ( letter to G. H. Darwin, 2 May [1876] ). Darwin even
  • letter to Andrew Clark, [late June 1876] ; letter to G. H. Darwin, 13 July [1876] ). The irony
  • she confided to Henrietta (letter from Emma Darwin to H. E. Litchfield, [31 August 1876] (DAR 219.9: …
  • been the subject of mere observation’ ( letter from T. H. Farrer, 31 December 1876 ). The Swiss
  • on the method, or remains in utter darkness’ ( letter to H. N. Moseley, 22 November 1876 ). …

Darwin in letters, 1871: An emptying nest

Summary

The year 1871 was an extremely busy and productive one for Darwin, with the publication in February of his long-awaited book on human evolution, Descent of man. The other main preoccupation of the year was the preparation of his manuscript on expression.…

Matches: 25 hits

  • The year 1871 was an extremely busy and productive one for Darwin, seeing the publication of his
  • book out of my head’. But  a large proportion of Darwins time for the rest of the year was devoted
  • way, and the initial reception of the book in the press. Darwin fielded numerous letters from
  • offered sharp criticism or even condemnation. Darwin had expected controversy. ‘I shall be
  • a bare-faced manner.”‘ The most lively debate centred on Darwins evolutionary account of the
  • taste. Correspondence with his readers and critics helped Darwin to clarify, and in some cases
  • year was the preparation of his manuscript on expression. Darwin continued to investigate the
  • also brought a significant milestone for the family, as Darwins eldest daughter Henrietta was
  • during several past years, has been a great amusement’. Darwin had been working fairly continuously
  • work on species theory in the late 1830s. In recent years, Darwin had collected a wealth of material
  • to human evolution was comparatively small, reflecting Darwins aim of  showing kinship with animals
  • he istorn to piecesby people wanting copies’, Darwin wrote to his son Francis on 28 February
  • letter from J. D. Hooker, 26 March 1871 ). The profits for Darwin were considerable. After
  • man.’ Promoting the book As usual, Darwin did his best to obtain a wide and favourable
  • … (see Correspondence vol. 19Appendix IV). Four of Darwins five sons received a copy, and his
  • received a special acknowledgment in the form of a gift. Darwin credited her for whatever he had
  • her liking, ‘to keep in memory of the book’ ( letter to H. E. Darwin, 20 March 1871 ). …
  • 1871). The geologist William Boyd Dawkins remarked on Darwins booksreception amongstartisans
  • … . ancestor lived between tide-marks!’ ( letter from T. H. Huxley, 20 February 1871 ). Asa Gray
  • only themost guarded expressions’ ( letter to St G. J. Mivart, 23 January [1871] ). …
  • Abraham Dee Bartlett, Albert Günther, George Busk, T. H. Huxley, Osbert Salvin, and William Henry
  • and misquoting of both Darwin and Catholic theology (T. H. Huxley 1871). Huxley judged Mivart to be
  • Popery and fear for his soul’ ( letter from T. H. Huxley and H. A. Huxley, 20 September 1871 ). …
  • who wasas good as twice refined gold’ ( letter to H. E. Litchfield, 4 September [1871] ). …
  • up to the last with quinine & sherry’ ( letter from H. E. Litchfield to Charles and Emma Darwin

Darwin in letters, 1877: Flowers and honours

Summary

Ever since the publication of Expression, Darwin’s research had centred firmly on botany. The year 1877 was no exception. The spring and early summer were spent completing Forms of flowers, his fifth book on a botanical topic. He then turned to the…

Matches: 28 hits

  • Ever since the publication of Expression , Darwins research had centred firmly on botany. The
  • of these projects would culminate in a major publication. Darwins botany was increasingly a
  • assisted his fathers research on movement and bloom, and Darwin in turn encouraged his sons own
  • The year 1877 was more than usually full of honours. Darwin received two elaborate photograph albums
  • from Germany, Austria, and the Netherlands. Closer to home, Darwin received an honorary Doctorate of
  • sites for possible earthworm activity. Now in his 69th year, Darwin remained remarkably productive, …
  • no controversy. In his autobiographical reflections, Darwin remarked: ‘no little discovery of
  • … (‘Recollections’, p. 419). During the winter and spring, Darwin was busy preparing the manuscript of
  • and trimorphism that he had written between 1861 and 1868 and presented to the Linnean Society of
  • as dimorphic without comparing pollen-grains & stigmas’, Darwin remarked to Joseph Dalton
  • measurements of the size and number of pollen-grains, Darwin compared the fertility of individual
  • primrose and purple loosestrife. In the course of his work, Darwin found a number of other
  • dreadful work making out anything about dried flowers’, Darwin complained to Asa Gray on 8 March
  • which include heterstyled species. This pleases me.’. Darwin dedicated the book to Gray, ‘as a small
  • separate publications together into a larger whole enabled Darwin to advance more speculative views
  • both pollen and seeds’ ( Forms of flowers , p. 344). Darwin was typically pessimistic about the
  • be sold’. His publisher knew from previous experience that Darwin was a poor judge of sales, and
  • after completing his manuscript of Forms of flowers , Darwin took up the problem ofbloomin
  • characteristic whose purpose was little understood. Darwin had begun studying bloom in August 1873, …
  • exchanged between Down and Kew over the next six months. Darwin corresponded most often with the
  • been for your kindness, we sh d . have broken down’, Darwin wrote back on 5 September . ‘As it
  • injury from pure water resting on leaves’. In the end, Darwin did not publish on the subject, but
  • on leaves and the distribution of the stomata’ (F. Darwin 1886). Alongside his work on bloom, …
  • with wicked imprecations’ (Trollope 1867; letter to G. J. Romanes, [1 and 2 December 1877] ). …
  • Charles Norton, had stayed at Keston Rectory near Down in 1868 and had visited Down House. Darwin
  • up to the mark hereafter is another question’ ( letter to G. H. Darwin, 30 May [1877] ). In the
  • by, or could contain, any earth worms’ ( letter from J. G. Joyce, 15 November 1877 ). Even at
  • between sagging of pavemts & castings’ ( letter to G. H. Darwin, 21 November [1877] ). It is

Darwin in letters, 1865: Delays and disappointments

Summary

The year was marked by three deaths of personal significance to Darwin: Hugh Falconer, a friend and supporter; Robert FitzRoy, captain of the Beagle; and William Jackson Hooker, director of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, and father of Darwin’s friend…

Matches: 19 hits

  • In 1865, the chief work on Charles Darwins mind was the writing of  The variation of animals and
  • letters on climbing plants to make another paper. Darwin also submitted a manuscript of his
  • protégé, John Scott, who was now working in India. Darwins transmutation theory continued to
  • Argyll, appeared in the religious weeklyGood Words . Darwin received news of an exchange of
  • Butler, and, according to Butler, the bishop of Wellington. Darwins theory was discussed at an
  • in the  GardenersChronicleAt the end of the year, Darwin was elected an honorary member of
  • year was marked by three deaths of personal significance to Darwin: Hugh Falconer, a friend of
  • in August. There was also a serious dispute between two of Darwins friends, John Lubbock and
  • jolly’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 7 January [1865] ). Darwin was ready to submit his paper on
  • a sudden illness. Falconer was 56, almost the same age as Darwin himself. Falconer had seconded
  • supported his candidacy, and had tried hard to persuade Darwin to accept the award in person (see  …
  • the improvement to Joness diet ( see letter to T. H. Huxley, 4 October [1865] ). It was not until
  • illness and delay, the book was not published until January 1868. 'Climbing plants' …
  • hang on it a good many groups of facts.’ ( Letter to T. H. Huxley, 27 May [1865] .) The
  • manuscript was published as chapter 27 of  Variation  in 1868. The wider debate
  • … “producingthis and that modification of structure’ (G. D. Campbell 1864, pp. 2756). Campbell
  • humans (see  Correspondence  vol. 10, letter from J. H. Balfour, 14 January 1862 ). According
  • a trying year. In January he had influenza ( letter from F. H. Hooker, [27 January 1865] ); before
  • Carr of Carrlyon , pronouncing itutter trash after G. Eliot’. Darwin replied ( letter to

Darwin in letters, 1863: Quarrels at home, honours abroad

Summary

At the start of 1863, Charles Darwin was actively working on the manuscript of The variation of animals and plants under domestication, anticipating with excitement the construction of a hothouse to accommodate his increasingly varied botanical experiments…

Matches: 27 hits

  • At the start of 1863, Charles Darwin was actively working on the manuscript of  The variation of
  • markedly, reflecting a decline in his already weak health. Darwin then began punctuating letters
  • am languid & bedeviled … & hate everybody’. Although Darwin did continue his botanical
  • letter-writing dwindled considerably. The correspondence and Darwins scientific work diminished
  • of the water-cure. The treatment was not effective and Darwin remained ill for the rest of the year. …
  • the correspondence from the year. These letters illustrate Darwins preoccupation with the
  • to mans place