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List of correspondents

Summary

Below is a list of Darwin's correspondents with the number of letters for each one. Click on a name to see the letters Darwin exchanged with that correspondent.    "A child of God" (1) Abberley,…

Matches: 19 hits

  • F. E. (17) Abernethy, J. W. (1) …
  • Acland, C. L. (1) Acland, H. W. (1) …
  • … (1) Ainslie, O. A. (3) Airy, Hubert
  • … (4) Alberts, Maurice (3) Albrecht, R. F. …
  • … (1) Ambrose, J. L. (3) American Academy of
  • … (1) Anderson, James (c) (3) Anderson-Henry, …
  • Ansell, G. F. (1) Ansted, D. T. (8) …
  • … (2) Arruda Furtado, Francisco d’ (10) …
  • Austen, J. T. (5) Austin, A. D. (2) …
  • Aveling, E. B. (7) Axon, W. E. A. (2) …
  • Bacon, Booth (1) Badger, E. W. (3) …
  • … (1) Balch, C. L. (3) Baldwin, J. D. …
  • … (5) Ball, Robert (3) Ball, Valentine
  • J. H. (2) Bartlett, A. D. (15) …
  • Brooks, W. C. (1) Brown, D. J. (1) …
  • Dudley (1) Campbell, G. D. (3) Canby
  • … & Galpin (1) Caton, J. D. (9) …
  • Mary (1) Conway, M. D. (9) Conybeare
  • Fowler, J. K. (1) Fox, C. W. (3) Fox

Darwin in letters, 1874: A turbulent year

Summary

The year 1874 was one of consolidation, reflection, and turmoil for Darwin. He spent the early months working on second editions of Coral reefs and Descent of man; the rest of the year was mostly devoted to further research on insectivorous plants. A…

Matches: 2 hits

  • … a hoax till I came to the woman’ ( letter to Asa Gray, 3 June [1874] ). Response to …
  • … head in different cultures ( letter from Chauncey Wright, 3 September 1874 ). The American …

Have you read the one about....

Summary

... the atheistical cats, or the old fogies in Cambridge? We've suggested a few - some funny, some serious - but all letters you can read here.

Matches: 1 hits

  • … ... the atheistical cats, or the old fogies in Cambridge? We've suggested a few - some funny, some …

Darwin in letters,1866: Survival of the fittest

Summary

The year 1866 began well for Charles Darwin, as his health, after several years of illness, was now considerably improved. In February, Darwin received a request from his publisher, John Murray, for a new edition of  Origin. Darwin got the fourth…

Matches: 7 hits

  • … Bence Jones: ‘I am able now to walk daily on an average 3½ miles & often one mile at a stretch…. …
  • … for about 1½ hours every day’ ( letter to H. B. Jones, 3 January [1866] ). Darwin had first …
  • … 4 June 1866, and in a letter to his cousin William Darwin Fox on 24 August [1866] , he wrote, ‘I …
  • … drawing Darwin, Hooker, and the botanist Charles James Fox Bunbury into the discussion of glacial …
  • … London, like what I was 7 or 8 years ago— one day I paid 3 calls! & then went for ¾ to Zoolog. …
  • … admit how little is known on the subject’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 3 and 4 August [1866] ). And …
  • … did in fact divide Darwin and Hooker, who remarked on 3 November that the application of high …

Darwin in letters, 1858-1859: Origin

Summary

The years 1858 and 1859 were, without doubt, the most momentous of Darwin’s life. From a quiet rural existence filled with steady work on his ‘big book’ on species, he was jolted into action by the arrival of an unexpected letter from Alfred Russel Wallace…

Matches: 21 hits

  • at the end of 1859, ‘I sometimes fancied that my book w  d  be successful; but I never even built
  • very perplexing’, he told his cousin William Darwin Fox, ‘from not knowing what to choose from the
  • approval of his argument is evident. ‘Though I sh  d . not have much cared about throwing away
  • myself that all was much alike, & if you condemned that you w d . condemn allmy lifes work— …
  • … ‘Your words have come true with a vengeance that I sh  d . be forestalled’, he lamented to Lyell. …
  • that Darwin received Wallaces letter and manuscript on 3 June 1858, the same day that another
  • was postmarkedSingapore Apr 21 58andLondon Ju 3 58’. Brooks maintains that Darwin
  • forwarded Wallaces paper to Lyell (Brooks 1984, pp. 2623). It is of some significance to note that
  • Correspondence vol. 7, Appendix V.) Upon the advice of Fox, the family fled the epidemic and
  • material would require asmall volume’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 12 October [1858] ). Begun while
  • appropriated the others ideas (see letters to J. D. Hooker, 2 March [1859] , 11 March [1859] …
  • plan of his book (see letter from Elwin to Murray, 3 May 1859 , and letter to John Murray, 6
  • title of the forthcoming book ( letter to Charles Lyell, 30 March [1859] ). Darwin next considered
  • … ‘We have been here above 6 week,’ he wrote to Fox, ‘& I feel worse than when I came’ ( letter
  • the fine points of Darwins theory ( see letter to J. D. Hooker, 6 May 1859 ). Among the older
  • theory for the origin of mankind. As he wrote to Darwin on 3 October 1859, ‘the case of Man and his
  • at me & leaves me to their mercies’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [22 November 1859] ). Late in
  • required a fresh act of intervention to supply the lacunas w h . he himself had made’ ( letter
  • got much more larky since we run two horses’ ( letter to W. E. Darwin, 6 October [1858] ). …
  • of it what they will. ‘You do me injustice’, he wrote to Fox, ‘when you think that I work for fame: …
  • sort of instinct to try to make out truth’ ( letter to W. D. Fox, 24 [March 1859] ). Yet he

Darwin in letters, 1872: Job done?

Summary

'My career’, Darwin wrote towards the end of 1872, 'is so nearly closed. . .  What little more I can do, shall be chiefly new work’, and the tenor of his correspondence throughout the year is one of wistful reminiscence, coupled with a keen eye…

Matches: 15 hits

  • my views’, he wrote to his publisher, John Murray, on 30 January , shortly after correcting the
  • Darwins best efforts, set the final price at 7 s.  6 d.  ( letter from RFCooke, 12
  • duck  most beautiful’ ( letter from ARWallace, 3 March 1872 ). I consider that you
  • because I do it badly’ ( letter to ARWallace, 3 August [1872] ).  Darwin's
  • … , and he complained to the German zoologist Anton Dohrn on 3 February that Mivarts book had &#039
  • … ( letter from Samuel Butler to Francis Darwin, [before 30 May 1872] , and letter from Samuel
  • Darwins wholeheartedly partisan reply ( letter to JDHooker, 14 May 1872 ). On 13 June, a
  • a week later ( enclosure to letter from John Lubbock to WEGladstone, 20 June 1872 ).  Darwin
  • to make one turn into an old honest Tory’ ( letter to JDHooker, 12 July [1872] ). …
  • Nature  in Wallaces defence ( letter to  Nature  , 3 August [1872] ).  Although the two
  • ready, on the eve of publication they were still short by 3000 sets of plates, leading Cooke to
  • use of the microscope led his head to `fail’ ( letter to WDFox, 29 October [1872] ) he had
  • moreshe observed ( letter from SHHaliburton, 3 November [1872] ). They reminisced about
  • fellow beetle-enthusiast from student days, William Darwin FoxThe two had not met for nearly ten
  • by hearing about Panagæus!’ Darwin wrote ( letter to WDFox,  16 July [1872] ).  I

Darwin in letters, 1868: Studying sex

Summary

The quantity of Darwin’s correspondence increased dramatically in 1868 due largely to his ever-widening research on human evolution and sexual selection.Darwin’s theory of sexual selection as applied to human descent led him to investigate aspects of the…

Matches: 20 hits

  • of ashort essayon man ( letter to Ernst Haeckel, 3 July 1868 ). But this work would eventually
  • to remuneration I shall look rather blank’ ( letter from W. S. Dallas, 8 January 1868 ). Darwin
  • to read a few pages feel fairly nauseated’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 3 February [1868] ). But such
  • thought it was by Gray himself, but Darwin corrected him: ‘D r  Gray would strike me in the face, …
  • scamp & I begin to think a veritable ass’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 1 September [1868] ). …
  • on 17 April 1868 . The letter was addressed tothe Rev d  C. Darwin M.d’; Binstead evidently
  • kind almost heroic, in you to sacrifice your hair and pay 3 d  in the cause of science
  • canary (letters from J. J. Weir, [26] March 1868 and 3 June 1868 ). ‘It was very kind’, …
  • it is clear that I have none’ ( letter to J. J. Weir, 30 May [1868] ). Sexual selection
  • well as ofvictorious males getting wives’ ( letter to W. D. Fox, 25 February [1868] ). …
  • of the female’, and of rats, John Bush observed on 30 March that two members of thelecherous
  • on 9 September . Darwin annotated a letter sent on 3 April by Henry Doubleday that contained a
  • pigeon magenta. To Weir, he wrote on 27 February : ‘It w d  be a fine trial to cut off the eyes
  • and had himself watched elephants cry (letters to W. E. Darwin, [15 March 1868] and 8 April
  • screaming in patients undergoing vaccination ( letter from W. E. Darwin, [7 April 1868] ). Francis
  • veins, and the action of his platysma muscle ( letter from W. E. Darwin, [15 April 1868] ). The
  • April 1868 , 17 June 1868 , 9 September 1868 , and 31 October 1868 ). ‘Heaven knows’, …
  • you have communicated to me’ ( letter to Fritz Müller, 3 June 1868 ). it is a fatal
  • of species through the study of monstrosities, remarked on 3 April , ‘your works are destined to
  • of everlasting woe?’ I am not sure whether it w d  not be wisest for scientific men

Darwin’s reading notebooks

Summary

In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he wished to read in Notebook C (Notebooks, pp. 319–28). In 1839, these lists were copied and continued in separate notebooks. The first of these reading notebooks (DAR 119…

Matches: 22 hits

  • books he wished to read in Notebook C ( Notebooks , pp. 31928). In 1839, these lists were copied
  • and this manuscript catalogue is in the Darwin Library (AC.34). Darwins books were bequeathed to
  • the University of Cambridge. These works, catalogued by H. W. Rutherford ( Catalogue of the library
  • Surgeons [DAR *119: 1] Books to be Read 3Traité de la Folie des
  • 4  [Pierquin de Gembloux 1839]. Said to be good by D r  L. Lindsay 5 [DAR *119: 1v. …
  • Richardsons Fauna Borealis [J. Richardson 182937] Entomological Magazine.—? paper on
  • on Annals of Nat. Hist. [Jenyns 1838] Prichard; a 3 d . vol [Prichard 183647] Lawrence [W. …
  • 1822] Falconers remark on the influence of climate [W. Falconer 1781] [DAR *119: 2v. …
  • Voyage aux terres australes [Péron 1824]— Chap. 39. tom. 4. p. 273. Latreille Geographie des
  • reference to authors about E. Indian Islands 8 consult D r  Horsfield [Horsfield 1824] …
  • sheep [Youatt 1831, 1834, 1837]. Verey Philosophie dHist. Nat. [Virey 1835] read
  • views Quoted by Owen [Hunter 1837] [DAR *119: 3v.] Hunter has written Quarto work
  • … [Dampier 1697] Sportsmans repository 4 to . [W. H. Scott 1820]— contains much on dogs
  • Crawford Eastern Archipelago [Crawfurd 1820] Raffeles d[itt]o [T. S. B. Raffles 1817] …
  • … [Temminck 181315] read Temminck has written Coup d’œil sur la Fauna des iles de la Sonde et
  • Read M r  Bennetts & other Edit. by Hon. & Rev. W. Herbert.— notes to White Nat. Hist of
  • read 19  : French [? Annales de la Société Impériale d'Horticulture ] or Caledonian
  • … [DAR *119: 8v.] A history of British Birds by W. Macgillivray [W. Macgillivray 183752].— I
  • The Highlands & Western Isl ds  letter to Sir W Scott [MacCulloch 1824] at Maer? W. F. …
  • th  Keppells Expedition to Borneo [Keppel 1846] 31. Foxs Hist of James 2 d . [Fox 1808] …
  • and London128: 25 Bunbury, Charles James Fox. 1848Journal of a residence at   the
  • and use of natural history . London119: 14a Fox, Charles James. 1808A history of

Darwin in letters, 1856-1857: the 'Big Book'

Summary

In May 1856, Darwin began writing up his 'species sketch’ in earnest. During this period, his working life was completely dominated by the preparation of his 'Big Book', which was to be called Natural selection. Using letters are the main…

Matches: 4 hits

  • … on domestic animals in India and elsewhere. William Darwin Fox supplied information about cats, dogs …
  • … their neighbouring continents (see  Correspondence  vol. 3), he had begun in 1855 a series of …
  • … Erasmus Darwin, [26 February 1856] and to Charles Lyell, 3 May [1856] ). Family life …
  • … see Lyell to discuss it further ( letter to Charles Lyell, 3 May [1856] ). It was after this …

'An Appeal' against animal cruelty

Summary

The four-page pamphlet transcribed below and entitled 'An Appeal', was composed jointly by Emma and Charles Darwin (see letter from Emma Darwin to W. D. Fox, [29 September 1863]). The pamphlet, which protested against the cruelty of steel vermin…

Matches: 4 hits

  • … (Turner 1980, pp. 17–45, Thomas 1984, pp. 149–50, 300–3, Ritvo 1990, pp. 126–135). As a result of …
  • … what they must feel, as I have had my finger caught.” 3 The smaller animals are often so …
  • … 8 Christ’s College Library, Cambridge (Fox 142) 1 The Act to prevent the cruel …
  • … cattle, excluding bulls ( Statutes, public and general , 3 Geo. IV c. 71). On attitudes to cruelty …

Darwin in letters, 1880: Sensitivity and worms

Summary

‘My heart & soul care for worms & nothing else in this world,’ Darwin wrote to his old Shrewsbury friend Henry Johnson on 14 November 1880. Darwin became fully devoted to earthworms in the spring of the year, just after finishing the manuscript of…

Matches: 4 hits

  • … Kingdom, & even the world’ ( letter from J. L. Chester, 3 March 1880 ). Darwin’s sons George …
  • … regret that I did not do so’ ( letter to Samuel Butler, 3 January 1880 ). At the top of Butler’s …
  • … It is a horrid disease’ ( letter from T. H. Huxley, 3 February 1880 ).                 All …
  • … letter … made me open my eyes’, Gray replied on 3 February , but he affirmed his original …

Darwin in letters, 1863: Quarrels at home, honours abroad

Summary

At the start of 1863, Charles Darwin was actively working on the manuscript of The variation of animals and plants under domestication, anticipating with excitement the construction of a hothouse to accommodate his increasingly varied botanical experiments…

Matches: 5 hits

  • … for his crimes… ?’ ( letter from Hugh Falconer, 3 January [1863] , and letter to Hugh Falconer, …
  • … between reptiles and birds ( letter from Hugh Falconer, 3 January [1863] ). Darwin was delighted …
  • … in opposition to him ( see letter to J. D. Hooker, [22–3 November 1863] ). However, it is certain …
  • … that ‘there are almost certainly several cases of 2 or 3 or more species blended together & now …
  • … is not at all palatable!’ ( letter from John Scott, [3 June 1863] ). Darwin’s early …

Darwin in letters,1870: Human evolution

Summary

The year 1870 is aptly summarised by the brief entry Darwin made in his journal: ‘The whole of the year at work on the Descent of Man & Selection in relation to Sex’.  Descent was the culmination of over three decades of observations and reflections on…

Matches: 2 hits

  • … its frequency and variability in humans ( Descent  1: 22-3). Humans as animals: facial …
  • … he informed his father ( letter from G. H. Darwin, [3 February 1870 or earlier] ). George devoted …

Darwin in letters, 1862: A multiplicity of experiments

Summary

1862 was a particularly productive year for Darwin. This was not only the case in his published output (two botanical papers and a book on the pollination mechanisms of orchids), but more particularly in the extent and breadth of the botanical experiments…

Matches: 7 hits

  • … Hooker told him: ‘you are alluded to in no less than 3 of the papers in Linn. Trans!— I do not think …
  • … his ‘ enormous  labour over them’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 14 [October 1862] ; see ML 2: 292–3) …
  • … extent of the subject, telling Oliver: ‘I can see at least 3 classes of dimorphism’ ( letter to …
  • … to the  Origin  ’ ( letter from Asa Gray, 2–3 July 1862 ). Henry Walter Bates …
  • … that it was only the administration of ‘Port-wine every 3/4 hour, night & day’ that saved the …
  • … and Emma ‘perplexed to death what to do’ ( letter to W. E. Darwin, [2–3 August 1862] ). They …
  • … with him, enthusiastically set to work ( see letter to W. E. Darwin, [2–3 August 1862] , and …

The writing of "Origin"

Summary

From a quiet rural existence at Down in Kent, filled with steady work on his ‘big book’ on the transmutation of species, Darwin was jolted into action in 1858 by the arrival of an unexpected letter (no longer extant) from Alfred Russel Wallace outlining a…

Matches: 19 hits

  • When I was in spirits I sometimes fancied that my book w d  be successful; but I never even built
  • very perplexing’, he told his cousin William Darwin Fox, ‘from not knowing what to choose from the
  • approval of his argument is evident. ‘Though I sh  d . not have much cared about throwing away
  • myself that all was much alike, & if you condemned that you w  d . condemn allmy lifes work— …
  • … ‘Your words have come true with a vengeance that I sh  d . be forestalled’, he lamented to Lyell. …
  • that Darwin received Wallaces letter and manuscript on 3 June 1858, the same day that another
  • was postmarkedSingapore Apr 21 58andLondon Ju 3 58’. Brooks maintains that Darwin
  • forwarded Wallaces paper to Lyell (Brooks 1984, pp. 2623). It is of some significance to note that
  • by his unexpected death on 28 June. Upon the advice of Fox, the family fled the epidemic and stayed
  • material would require asmall volume’ (letter to J. D. Hooker, 12 October [1858] ). Begun while
  • plan of his book (see letter from Elwin to Murray, 3 May 1859 , and letter to John Murray, 6
  • title of the forthcoming book (letter to Charles Lyell, 30 March [1859] ). Darwin next considered
  • … ‘We have been here above 6 week,’ he wrote to Fox, ‘& I feel worse than when I came’ (letter to
  • about the fine points of Darwins theory (see letter to J. D. Hooker, 6 May 1859 ). Among the
  • theory for the origin of mankind. As he wrote to Darwin on 3 October 1859 , ‘the case of Man and
  • Priests at me & leaves me to their mercies’ (letter to J. D. Hooker, [22 November 1859] ). …
  • required a fresh act of intervention to supply the lacunas w  h . he himself had made’ (letter
  • of it what they will. ‘You do me injustice’, he wrote to Fox, ‘when you think that I work for fame: …
  • a sort of instinct to try to make out truth’ (letter to W. D. Fox, 24 [March 1859] ). Yet he

Science, Work and Manliness

Summary

Discussion Questions|Letters In 1859, popular didactic writer William Landels published the first edition of what proved to be one of his best-selling works, How Men Are Made. "It is by work, work, work" he told his middle class audience, …

Matches: 1 hits

  • … this differ from how Darwin praised women's work ? 3. What implications might …

Before Origin: the ‘big book’

Summary

Darwin began ‘sorting notes for Species Theory’ on 9 September 1854, the very day he concluded his eight-year study of barnacles (Darwin's Journal). He had long considered the question of species. In 1842, he outlined a theory of transmutation in a…

Matches: 12 hits

  • my notes, collating & comparing them, in order in some 2 or 3 years to write a book with all the
  • of species ’, he told his cousin William Darwin Fox. Experimental work Darwin
  • to set up to provide crucial evidence for his arguments. Fox, Darwin assumed, would have bred
  • me at a guess how long an immersion in sea-water you sh dimagine  w d . kill the more
  • to hear of them, he might easily work them in, & then I sh d . have to quote from a work
  • hate the idea of writing for priority, yet I certainly sh d . be vexed if any one were to publish
  • to publish without full details. ’ Writing to his cousin Fox in June 1856, Darwin openly confessed
  • of this acceleration was revealed, when he told his cousin Fox: ‘ I am working very hard at my Book
  • he called hisweed garden’—a cleared plot of land 3 x 2 feet on which he let seedlings spring up
  • interested in the way facts fall into groups ’, he told Fox in February 1857. Trials of
  • … ‘Your words have come true with a vengeance that I sh d . be forestalled’, he told Lyell, ‘ I
  • far rather burn my whole book than that he or any man sh d . think that I had behaved in a paltry

Darwin in letters, 1851-1855: Death of a daughter

Summary

The letters from these years reveal the main preoccupations of Darwin’s life with a new intensity. The period opens with a family tragedy in the death of Darwin’s oldest and favourite daughter, Anne, and it shows how, weary and mourning his dead child,…

Matches: 3 hits

  • … essay of 1844 ( Foundations ; Correspondence  vols. 3 and 4). In particular, he undertook to …
  • … been actively interested in animal breeding. As Darwin told Fox in a letter of 27 March [1855] , …
  • … doubt whether the subject will not quite overpower me.—’ Fox supplied him with a steady stream of …

Darwin in letters, 1837–1843: The London years to 'natural selection'

Summary

The seven-year period following Darwin's return to England from the Beagle voyage was one of extraordinary activity and productivity in which he became recognised as a naturalist of outstanding ability, as an author and editor, and as a professional…

Matches: 11 hits

  • variety of publications. The beetles were described by F. W. Hope, G. R. Waterhouse, and C. C. …
  • distribution and classification (see Henslow 1837a and 1838; W. J. Hooker and G. A. W. Arnott 1836, …
  • were discovered that contain lists of Darwins plants (see D. M. Porter 1981). Charles Lyell
  • Jenyns, Waterhouse, and his second cousin, William Darwin Foxknew, as he said to Henslow, he was
  • with facts It is true that, until he took J. D. Hooker into his confidence in 1844, …
  • convince anyone that he had a sound solution to what J. F. W. Herschel in a letter to Lyell had
  • clearly  under sub-laws.' To his cousin, W. D. Fox, [25 January 1841] , he wrote: & …
  • in this field and on friends like Henslow, T. C. Eyton, and W. D. Fox, who were knowledgeable about
  • between species and varieties had no basis in reality (W. Herbert 1837, p. 341); species were only
  • … [20 February 1840] , ‘as usual has been my enemybut D r . Holland tells me he thinks it is only
  • so-calledscience of morphology’, first set forth by J. W. von Goethe. Though widely accepted in

Darwin in letters, 1864: Failing health

Summary

On receiving a photograph from Charles Darwin, the American botanist Asa Gray wrote on 11 July 1864: ‘the venerable beard gives the look of your having suffered, and … of having grown older’.  Because of poor health, Because of poor health, Darwin…

Matches: 23 hits

  • years. As Darwin explained to his cousin William Darwin Fox in a letter of 30 November [1864] , …
  • a dramatic conclusion to the year. Darwin also wrote to Fox that he was mostly pleased to have been
  • by which  leaves  produce tendrils’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [8 February 1864] ). Darwins
  • it is a leaf climber & therefore sacred’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 2 June [1864] ). …
  • Menyanthes  ( letter from Emma and Charles Darwin to W. E. Darwin, [20 May 1864] ), or his
  • that natureabhors self-fertilisation’ ( Orchids , p. 359), he continued studying the adaptations
  • his stipend being paid by Darwin himself ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [1 April 1864] ). Hooker
  • often at odds with one another: ‘Gardeners are the very dl, & where two or three are gathered
  • to play your part  over  them’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, [2 April 1864] ). Hooker
  • they do require very careful treatment’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 8 April 1864 ). Nevertheless, …
  • that in giving I am hastening the fall’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 20 April 1864 ). In his
  • a first-class cabin for the journey ( letter from J. D. Hooker, [15 August 1864] ). Darwin
  • him except á la Darwin!’ ( letter from Hugh Falconer, 3 November 186[4] ). The French botanist, …
  • you have bearded this lion in his den’ ( letter to B. D. Walsh, 4 December [1864] ). Walsh also
  • he spoke out on the modification of species ( letter to B. D. Walsh, 21 October [1864] ). …
  • … ‘make a noise’, since the author evidentlysmashe[d] most of the old Testament’ ( Correspondence
  • he thought himsanguine & unsafe’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 16 February 1864 ). Hooker
  • correct if they contradicted the Bible ( see letter from J. D. Hooker, [19 September 1864] ). When
  • Lyell 1865] I shall recant for fifth time’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 22 October [1864] ). Lyell
  • displayingremarkable genius’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 22 [May 1864] ). He added that he wished
  • …  agreewith Wallaces views on humans ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 22 [May 1864] ), and he pointed
  • him with Royal Soc  y ’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 3 November [1864] ). Darwin and Wallaces
  • that truly enlivened him. Though he complained to his cousin Fox in the letter of 30 November
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