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Darwin’s reading notebooks

Summary

In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he wished to read in Notebook C (Notebooks, pp. 319–28). In 1839, these lists were copied and continued in separate notebooks. The first of these reading notebooks (DAR 119…

Matches: 27 hits

  • In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he wished to
  • … (DAR 119) opens with five pages of text copied from Notebook C and carries on through 1851; the
  • used these notebooks extensively in dating and annotating Darwins letters; the full transcript
  • … *128). For clarity, the transcript does not record Darwins alterations. The spelling and
  • book had been consulted. Those cases where it appears that Darwin made a genuine deletion have been
  • a few instances, primarily in theBooks Readsections, Darwin recorded that a work had been
  • of the books listed in the other two notebooks. Sometimes Darwin recorded that an abstract of the
  • own. Soon after beginning his first reading notebook, Darwin began to separate the scientific
  • the second reading notebook. Readers primarily interested in Darwins scientific reading, therefore, …
  • editorsidentification of the book or article to which Darwin refers. A full list of these works is
  • to be Read [DAR *119: Inside Front Cover] C. Darwin June 1 st . 1838
  • … [DAR *119: 2v.] Whites regular gradation in man [C. White 1799] Lindleys
  • 8 vo  p 181 [Latreille 1819]. see p. 17 Note Book C. for reference to authors about E. Indian
  • 1833] (Boot) Leslie life of Constable [Leslie 1843]. (Emma) (read) M rs  Frys Life
  • … [Fellows 1839] Catherine 48 Life of Collins R.A. [Collins 1848] Phases of Faith
  • from Parent to offspring of some Forms of Disease. 1851 [Whitehead 1851]. Packard. A Guide to
  • … [Malcolm 1836] H. Dixon Life of Pen [W. H. Dixon 1851].— Southeys Life of Wesley [R. …
  • Humboldt 1849]. Liebigs Lectures on Chemistry [Liebig 1851]. Sir John Davies. China
  • Steenstrup on Hermaphroditismus [Steenstrup 1846]. 1851. Jan. 6 th . Pickering Races
  • Public Library. 3  ‘BooksReadis in Emma Darwins hand. 4  “”Traité …
  • 6  The text from page [1v.] to page [6] is in Emma Darwins hand and was copied from Notebook C, …
  • to old Aristotle.’ ( LL 3: 252). 10  Emma Darwin wrote7 thinstead of3 d “ …
  • 12  A mistranscription forEntozoaby Emma Darwin. See Notebook C, p. 266 ( Notebooks ). …
  • 1848Memoirs of the life of William   Collins, Esq., R.A.  2 vols. London.  *119: 23; 119: …
  • by Richard Owen.  Vol. 4 of  The works of John Hunter, F.R.S. with notes . Edited by James F. …
  • Robert. 1843Memoirs of the life of John   Constable, R.A., composed chiefly of his letters. …
  • Peacock, George. 1855Life of Thomas Young, M.D., F.R.S.  London.  *128: 172; 128: 21

Darwin’s observations on his children

Summary

Charles Darwin’s observations on the development of his children, began the research that culminated in his book The Expression of the emotions in man and animals, published in 1872, and his article ‘A biographical sketch of an infant’, published in Mind…

Matches: 22 hits

  • Charles Darwins observations on the development of his children,[1began the
  • is available below . As with much of his other work, Darwin gathered additional information on the
  • lunatics, the blind, and animals. And as early as 1839 Darwin had begun to collect information on
  • the expression of emotions. As the following transcript of Darwins notes reveals, he closely
  • William Erasmus, the stages of his development suggesting to Darwin those expressions which are
  • The tone of the manuscript reflects an aspect of Darwins character clearly perceived by Emma during
  • … “What does that prove”.’[6For in these notes, Darwins deep scientific curiosity transcends his
  • that on occasion he refers to William asit’. Darwin possessed the ability to dissociate
  • memories.[8Yet, though the dissociation was essential for Darwins scientific goal, the notes here
  • period but in far less detail. By September 1844, Henrietta Emma was one year old, and there are a
  • the record breaks off until January 1852, by which time the Darwin family had increased by five: …
  • 1848; Leonard, born 15 January 1850; and Horace, born 18 May 1851. It appears to have been Emma who
  • of logical thought and language. On 20 May 1854, Darwin again took over the notebook and, …
  • certainly during first fortnight at sudden sounds. & at Emmas moving 3 [11]  When
  • of muscles, without a corresponding sensation. D r . Holland[12informs me children do not
  • … & inwards as in sleep.[14] Six weeks old & 3 days, Emma saw him smilenot only with
  • trowsers. Emma one morning put on an unconspicuous bonnet of C. Langton,[52W. instantly observed
  • she added an s to the end of every wordEttis & Bettis &c afterwards all the ws were turned
  • goed dawn to the willage”. Fish for Smith. Kaw for cow. &c. Lenny[612 years old speaks
  • any thing with my egg. Miss Th. Shall I cut up y r  meat? L. I dont care whether you do or
  • … “But I could not help it”— I saidLenny you c d  help it, dont say that”. “I could not help it a
  • E. Litchfield papers, CUL). [71Horace Darwin, born 1851. [72Leonard Darwins

Darwin in letters, 1851-1855: Death of a daughter

Summary

The letters from these years reveal the main preoccupations of Darwin’s life with a new intensity. The period opens with a family tragedy in the death of Darwin’s oldest and favourite daughter, Anne, and it shows how, weary and mourning his dead child,…

Matches: 19 hits

  • letters from these years reveal the main preoccupations of Darwins life with a new intensity. The
  • life but I trust happy The anguish felt by Darwin is painfully expressed in letters
  • speak of her again. Yet the family gradually recovered, Darwins monographs were printed, and Darwin
  • to the cirripedes. Before turning to his species work, Darwin somewhat ruefully recorded in his
  • monographs by natural history societies, though welcomed by Darwin, did not run smoothly. …
  • the  Correspondence  describes the major achievements of Darwins cirripede work as a whole and
  • details with the Ray Society for  Living Cirripedia  (1851) and with the Palaeontographical
  • societies, which were supported by subscriptions, was that Darwins volumes were not publicly
  • in Germany at the forefront of work in invertebrate zoology, Darwin began a correspondence with
  • provided the foundations for a relationship with Darwin that soon developed into a valued friendship
  • April 1854, when his cirripede study was drawing to a close, Darwin re-entered London scientific
  • with lots of claret is what I want Perhaps Darwins decision to take a more active
  • to substantiate it is manifest in the correspondence. Darwins friends and colleagues were
  • outspoken young naturalists like Huxley, reacted eagerly to Darwins suggestions, although not
  • for the geographical distribution of animals and plants. Darwin began a series of researches on the
  • with the effects of known changes in climate and geology. Darwin boldly rejected the popular idea of
  • Some of the most interesting letters in this volume set out Darwins practical researches and
  • Variation and extinction The other main focus of Darwins research centred on determining the
  • classification Hybridism, domestic animals & plants &c &c &c) to see how far they

Darwin in letters, 1863: Quarrels at home, honours abroad

Summary

At the start of 1863, Charles Darwin was actively working on the manuscript of The variation of animals and plants under domestication, anticipating with excitement the construction of a hothouse to accommodate his increasingly varied botanical experiments…

Matches: 25 hits

  • At the start of 1863, Charles Darwin was actively working on the manuscript of  The variation of
  • markedly, reflecting a decline in his already weak health. Darwin then began punctuating letters
  • am languid & bedeviled … & hate everybody’. Although Darwin did continue his botanical
  • letter-writing dwindled considerably. The correspondence and Darwins scientific work diminished
  • of the water-cure. The treatment was not effective and Darwin remained ill for the rest of the year. …
  • the correspondence from the year. These letters illustrate Darwins preoccupation with the
  • to mans place in nature  both had a direct bearing on Darwins species theory and on the problem
  • detailed anatomical similarities between humans and apes, Darwin was full of praise. He especially
  • in expressing any judgment on Species or origin of man’. Darwins concern about the popular
  • Lyells and Huxleys books. Three years earlier Darwin had predicted that Lyells forthcoming
  • first half of 1863 focused attention even more closely on Darwins arguments for species change. …
  • … ‘groan’ ( letter to Charles Lyell, 6 March [1863] ). Darwin reiterated in a later letter that it
  • of creation, and the origin of species particularly, worried Darwin; he told Hooker that he had once
  • letter to J. D. Hooker, 24[–5] February [1863] ). Darwin did not relish telling Lyell of his
  • … ( letter to Charles Lyell, 6 March [1863] ). Nevertheless, Darwins regret was profound that the
  • thebrutes’, but added that he would bring many towards Darwin who would have rebelled against
  • sentence from the second edition of  Antiquity of man  (C. Lyell 1863b, p. 469), published in
  • had been unsuccessful ( see letter from E. A. Darwin to Emma Darwin, 11 November [1863] ). The
  • letter to Charles Lyell, 1213 March [1863] ). Emma was a steady help to Darwin, writing
  • very slowly recovering, but am very weak’ ( letter to A. R. Wallace, [29 September? 1863] ). …
  • … ). The Darwinsdaughter, Annie, had died at Malvern in 1851, and Hookers news was a powerful
  • shrubs ( see letter from W. D. Fox, 7 September [1863] ). Emma wrote back: ‘This has been a great
  • fared little better, and most letters were dictated to Emma. Darwin only managed one of his
  • Thomass Hospital, London ( letter from George Busk, [ c. 27 August 1863] ). Brinton, who
  • letters from him in December were short, and dictated to Emma. By the end of the year, Emma admitted

Darwin in letters, 1876: In the midst of life

Summary

1876 was the year in which the Darwins became grandparents for the first time.  And tragically lost their daughter-in-law, Amy, who died just days after her son's birth.  All the letters from 1876 are now published in volume 24 of The Correspondence…

Matches: 22 hits

  • The year 1876 started out sedately enough with Darwin working on the first draft of his book on the
  • life in Down House measured by the ongoing tally of his and Emmas backgammon games. ‘I have won, …
  • regarding the ailments that were so much a feature of Darwin family life. But the calm was not to
  • four days later. ‘I cannot bear to think of the future’, Darwin confessed to William on 11
  • once, the labour of checking proofs proved a blessing, as Darwin sought solace for the loss of his
  • and his baby son Bernard now part of the household, and Darwin recasting his work on dimorphic and
  • had involved much time and effort the previous year, and Darwin clearly wanted to focus his
  • of the second edition of Climbing plants ( letter from R. F. Cooke, 23 February 1876 ). When
  • single-volume edition titled Geological observations , Darwin resisted making any revisions at
  • volume, Coral reefs , already in its second edition. Darwin was neverthelessfirmly resolved not
  • effected by his forthcoming pamphlet, Darwin confounded (C. OShaughnessy 1876), which, he
  • and who had succeeded in giving him pain ( letter to A. R. Wallace, 17 June 1876 ). Although
  • years experiments’ ( letter from G. J. Romanes, [ c . 19 March 1876] ). A less welcome reaction
  • was never far away in the Darwin family. In April, while Emma was suffering from a feverish cold, …
  • because of along and terrible illness’ ( letter to C. S. Wedgwood, 20 April 1876 ). By the time
  • associated with a happy event. On 7 September, Charles and Emma became grandparents for the first
  • his oldest daughter Annie, who died at the age of 10 in 1851, but William, who was 11 years old at
  • have heart to go on again . . . I cannot conceive Emma and Charles exhibited a practical
  • August to be with her daughter at the time of the birth, and Emma was unimpressed by her. ‘The more
  • word she says’, she confided to Henrietta (letter from Emma Darwin to H. E. Litchfield, [31 August
  • ability to console Francis after Amys death gained Emmas respect. ‘She is always able to speak’, …
  • in harmony with yours’ ( letter from George Henslow, [ c. 7 December 1876] ). A more typical

Darwin in letters, 1858-1859: Origin

Summary

The years 1858 and 1859 were, without doubt, the most momentous of Darwin’s life. From a quiet rural existence filled with steady work on his ‘big book’ on species, he was jolted into action by the arrival of an unexpected letter from Alfred Russel Wallace…

Matches: 26 hits

  • 1858 and 1859 were, without doubt, the most momentous of Darwins life. From a quiet rural existence
  • Russel Wallace. This letter led to the first announcement of Darwins and Wallaces respective
  • the composition and publication, in November 1859, of Darwins major treatise  On the origin of
  • …  exceeded my wildest hopes By the end of 1859, Darwins work was being discussed in
  • Charles Lyell, 25 [November 1859] ). This transformation in Darwins personal world and the
  • The 'big book' The year 1858 opened with Darwin hard at work preparing hisbig
  • his ninth chapter, on hybridism, on 29 December 1857, Darwin began in January 1858 to prepare the
  • appropriate. The correspondence shows that at any one time Darwin was engaged in a number of
  • The chapter on instinct posed a number of problems for Darwin. ‘I find my chapter on Instinct very
  • … ). In addition to behaviour such as nest-building in birds, Darwin intended to discuss many other
  • celebrated as a classic example of divine design in nature. Darwin hypothesised that the instinct of
  • of construction as it took place in the hive. As with Darwins study of poultry and pigeons, …
  • founder and president of the Apiarian Society, provided Darwin with information and specimens. His
  • For assistance with mathematical measurements and geometry, Darwin called upon William Hallowes
  • from the  Beagle voyage; on his brother, Erasmus Alvey Darwin; and his son William. Even his
  • bees and bee-hives. Variation and reversion Darwin also continued the botanical work
  • of smaller genera? The inquiry was of great importance to Darwin, for such evidence would support
  • of the statistics was still problematic. Hooker thought that Darwin was wrong to assume that
  • were not certain. This was a question new to the experts. Darwin was delighted to hear from Asa Gray
  • completed and his results written up. With some trepidation, Darwin sent his manuscript off to
  • work—& that I confess made me a little lowbut I c d . have borne it, for I have the
  • in the letters of 1858 also relate to questions that Darwin had begun to explore earlier. Letters to
  • rush to publish With much of his research completed, Darwin began in mid-June 1858 to write
  • to Lyell. On 18 June 1858, his eldest daughter, Henrietta Emma, who had been ill since the beginning
  • of Glen Roy, and his monograph on  Fossil Cirripedia  (1851 and 1854) ( Quarterly Journal of the
  • it is impossible that men like Lyell, Hooker, Huxley, H. C. Watson, Ramsay &c would change their