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Darwin’s reading notebooks

Summary

In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he wished to read in Notebook C (Notebooks, pp. 319–28). In 1839, these lists were copied and continued in separate notebooks. The first of these reading notebooks (DAR 119…

Matches: 24 hits

  • In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he wished to
  • … (DAR 119) opens with five pages of text copied from Notebook C and carries on through 1851; the
  • used these notebooks extensively in dating and annotating Darwins letters; the full transcript
  • … *128). For clarity, the transcript does not record Darwins alterations. The spelling and
  • book had been consulted. Those cases where it appears that Darwin made a genuine deletion have been
  • to be Read [DAR *119: Inside Front Cover] C. Darwin June 1 st . 1838
  • … [DAR *119: 2v.] Whites regular gradation in man [C. White 1799] Lindleys
  • 8 vo  p 181 [Latreille 1819]. see p. 17 Note Book C. for reference to authors about E. Indian
  • Medical Rev. N o  14. Ap 1839 [Anon. 1839b] Rev. on Walker on Intermarriage [A. Walker 1838] …
  • facts on cross-bred animals, M r  Yarrell has it?? Walker on Interriage [A. Walker 1838] …
  • 765. in Geograph. Soc?? Review of this in Edin. Phil Jour. 1840. June [Anon. 1840]. Report of
  • 26Account of Domestic &ampForeign  Bees [Jardine ed. 1840]: (Athenæum 1840 p. 195) …
  • A. Necker 1823] read Lindleys Horticulture [Lindley 1840]— Chapter on Races improvement of
  • … [Fellows 1839] Catherine 48 Life of Collins R.A. [Collins 1848] Phases of Faith
  • Skimmed. Coral & Transmut. theory —— Walker on intermarriage [Walker 1838]— List
  • 1 (1847) in Darwin Library.] *128: 179 Arnold, Thomas. 183843History of Rome . 3
  • de   Pekin . 16 vols. Paris128: 18 Beale, Thomas. 1839The natural history of the
  • ed. (1874) in Darwin Library.]  119: 5a Bell, Thomas. 1837A history of British
  • Croker. 5 vols. London119: 4a, 9b Boteler, Thomas. 1835Narrative of a voyage of
  • of natural history . London119: 20a Browne, Thomas. 1643Religio Medici . First
  • 1848Memoirs of the life of William   Collins, Esq., R.A.  2 vols. London.  *119: 23; 119: …
  • by Richard Owen.  Vol. 4 of  The works of John Hunter, F.R.S. with notes . Edited by James F. …
  • Robert. 1843Memoirs of the life of John   Constable, R.A., composed chiefly of his letters. …
  • Peacock, George. 1855Life of Thomas Young, M.D., F.R.S.  London.  *128: 172; 128: 21

Darwin in letters, 1874: A turbulent year

Summary

The year 1874 was one of consolidation, reflection, and turmoil for Darwin. He spent the early months working on second editions of Coral reefs and Descent of man; the rest of the year was mostly devoted to further research on insectivorous plants. A…

Matches: 23 hits

  • 1874 was one of consolidation, reflection, and turmoil for Darwin. He spent the early months working
  • dispute over an anonymous review that attacked the work of Darwins son George dominated the second
  • and traveller Alexander von Humboldts 105th birthday, Darwin obliged with a reflection on his debt
  • during prolonged intervals’ ( letter to D. T. Gardner, [ c . 27 August 1874] ). The death of a
  • from W. D. Fox, 8 May [1874] ).  Such reminiscences led Darwin to the self-assessment, ‘as for one
  • I feel very old & helpless The year started for Darwin with a weeks visit to
  • Andrew Clark, whom he had been consulting since August 1873. Darwin had originally thought that
  • …  ( letter to B. J. Sulivan, 6 January [1874] ). Darwin mentioned his poor health so frequently in
  • 1874 ). Séances, psychics, and sceptics Darwin excused himself for reasons of
  • by George Henry Lewes and Marian Evans (George Eliot), but Darwin excused himself, finding it too
  • the month, another Williams séance was held at the home of Darwins cousin Hensleigh Wedgwood. Those
  • 2d ed., p. 258 n. 99). The former bishop of Honolulu, Thomas Nettleship Staley, and Titus Munson
  • Descent  was published in November 1874 ( letter from R. F. Cooke, 12 November 1874 ). Though
  • on subsequent print runs would be very good ( letter from R. F. Cooke, 12 November 1874 ). …
  • in a few hours dissolve the hardest cartilage, bone & meat &c. &c.’ ( letter to W. D. …
  • on the digestibility of various substances on his behalf. Thomas Lauder Brunton sent the results of
  • whether at theclose of the putrefaction of flesh, skin &c, any substance is produced before
  • At the other end of the spectrum, the Dublin accounts clerk Thomas Cooke Copland sent Darwin details
  • letter from S. W. Pennypacker, 14 September 1874 ). Thomas Lauder Brunton sent Darwin
  • often returned to the vomit and ate it ( letter from W. G. Walker, 6 December 1874 ). The
  • Sharpe for promotion at the British Museum ( letter to R. B. Sharpe, 24 November [1874] ).  He
  • you have to doIt is enough to kill anyone’, and asked Thomas Henry Farrer to attempt to influence
  • head that M r  Spencers terms of equilibration &c always bother me & make everything less

Darwin in letters, 1837–1843: The London years to 'natural selection'

Summary

The seven-year period following Darwin's return to England from the Beagle voyage was one of extraordinary activity and productivity in which he became recognised as a naturalist of outstanding ability, as an author and editor, and as a professional…

Matches: 23 hits

  • The seven-year period following Darwin's return to England from the Beagle  voyage was one
  • a family Busy as he was with scientific activities, Darwin found time to re-establish family
  • close contact. In November 1838, two years after his return, Darwin became engaged to his cousin, …
  • daughter, Anne Elizabeth, moved to Down House in Kent, where Darwin was to spend the rest of his
  • his greatest theoretical achievement, the most important of Darwins activities during the years
  • identifications of his bird and fossil mammal specimens, Darwin arrived at the daring and momentous
  • ideas on a wide range of topics. Then, in September 1838, T. R. Malthus’  An essay on the principle
  • in species. With this new theoretical point of departure Darwin continued to make notes and explore
  • present in the version of 1859. Young author Darwins investigation of the species
  • Agassiz (see Barrett 1973, Rudwick 1974, and L. Agassiz 1840). In another paper, “On the
  • Fossil Mammalia , by Richard OwenMammalia , by G. R. WaterhouseBirds , by John Gould;  …
  • publications. The beetles were described by F. W. Hope, G. R. Waterhouse, and C. C. Babington; the
  • 2). Darwins crustacean specimens, originally entrusted to Thomas Bell, subsequently purchased by
  • all crosses between all domestic birds & animals dogs, cats &c &c very valuable—' …
  • on literature in this field and on friends like Henslow, T. C. Eyton, and W. D. Fox, who were
  • the practice of systematists. As the correspondence with G. R. Waterhouse during the 1840s shows, …
  • same, though I know what I am looking for' ( Letter to G. R. Waterhouse, [26 July 1843] ).  …
  • to how one ought to act’ ( Letter from Emma Darwin, [  c.  February 1839] ). These are not
  • My stomach as usual has been my enemy In 1840 the illness was different. As he wrote to
  • life. ‘My stomach’, he wrote to FitzRoy, [20 February 1840] , ‘as usual has been my enemybut D
  • reasonable diagnosis (see Colp 1977). The illness of 1840 appears to have been the
  • descendants, twelve letters from Darwin to Kemp in the years 1840 to 1843 have come to light; they
  • relation of fossil with recent. the fabric falls!' (Notebook C : 767). …