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List of correspondents

Summary

Below is a list of Darwin's correspondents with the number of letters for each one. Click on a name to see the letters Darwin exchanged with that correspondent.    "A child of God" (1) Abberley,…

Matches: 13 hits

  • … Below is a list of Darwin's correspondents with the number of letters for each one. …
  • … and Sciences (1) Anderson, G. S. (1) …
  • … Bushell (1) Ansell, G. F. (1) Ansted …
  • … Ashburner, Lionel (1) Asher, G. M. (7) …
  • … Baikie, W. B. (1) Baildon, H. B. (1) …
  • … A. F. (1) Baillière, G.-G. (1) Baily …
  • … A. F. (1) Bakewell, R. H. (1) Balch, …
  • … Valentine (1) Bancroft, H. H. (1) …
  • … Barnes, K. S. (1) Barr, J. G. R. (1) …
  • … W. F. (1) Barrois, J. H. (2) …
  • … Beall, T. B. (1) Bearpark, G. E. (1) …
  • … Peter (1) Bianconi, G. G. (4) …
  • … Dareste, Camille (9) Darwin family (1) …

Darwin in letters, 1880: Sensitivity and worms

Summary

‘My heart & soul care for worms & nothing else in this world,’ Darwin wrote to his old Shrewsbury friend Henry Johnson on 14 November 1880. Darwin became fully devoted to earthworms in the spring of the year, just after finishing the manuscript of…

Matches: 21 hits

  • heart & soul care for worms & nothing else in this world,’ Darwin wrote to his old
  • to adapt to varying conditions. The implications of Darwins work for the boundary between animals
  • studies of animal instincts by George John Romanes drew upon Darwins early observations of infants, …
  • of evolution and creation. Many letters flowed between Darwin and his children, as he took delight
  • Financial support for science was a recurring issue, as Darwin tried to secure a Civil List pension
  • with Samuel Butler, prompted by the publication of Erasmus Darwin the previous year. …
  • Erasmuss life and other bits of family history. On 1 January , a distant cousin, Charles
  • character is of much value to me’ ( letter to C. H. Tindal, 5 January 1880 ). Darwin had employed
  • … & even the world’ ( letter from J. L. Chester, 3 March 1880 ). Darwins sons George and
  • of [William Alvey Darwin],’ George wrote on 28 May 1880 , ‘Isaid you were anxious not to
  • letter from W. E. Darwin to Charles and Emma Darwin, 22 July 1880 ).                 Sales
  • … , sending one or both to his daughter Henrietta ( letter to H. E. Litchfield, 1 February [1880] ). …
  • he will have the last word’, she warned ( letter from H. E. Litchfield, [1 February 1880] ). ‘He
  • Darwinophobia? It is a horrid disease’ ( letter from T. H. Huxley, 3 February 1880 ).       …
  • I was, also, rarely fit to see anybody’ ( letter to S. H. Haliburton, 13 December 1880 ). …
  • thus one looks to prevent its return’ ( letter from J.-H. Fabre, 18 February 1880 ). Darwin shared
  • and letting them out of their respective bags ( letter from G. J. Romanes, [6, 13, or 20] March
  • received more attention than the baby!’ ( letter from G. J. Romanes, 17 December 1880 , and
  • biologist of our time’ ( letter from W. D. Roebuck to G. H. Darwin, 25 October 1880 ). The
  • 21 years since the Origin appeared”‘ ( letter to T. H. Huxley, 11 [April] 1880 ). While praising
  • been developed through natural selection’ ( letter to T. H. Huxley, 11 May 1880 ). Worthy

Darwin’s queries on expression

Summary

When Darwin resumed systematic research on emotions around 1866, he began to collect observations more widely and composed a list of queries on human expression. A number of handwritten copies were sent out in 1867 (see, for example, letter to Fritz Muller…

Matches: 18 hits

  • When Darwin resumed systematic research on emotions around 1866, he began to collect observations
  • expression. A number of handwritten copies were sent out in 1867 (see, for example, letter to
  • cultural and conventional, or instinctive and universal. Darwin used his existing correspondence
  • and with the mouth a little drawn back at the corners?” Darwins questionnaire was an extension of
  • was also carefully devised so as to prevent the feelings of Darwins remote observers from colouring
  • in Ceylon, wrote the botanist George Thwaites on 22 July 1868 , “all endeavour to drill their
  • Scottish botanist John Scott wrote from Calcutta, 4 May 1868 : “Shame isexpressed by an
  • and not the susceptibilities of a moral nature.” Darwin did not typically countenance such
  • the collection of information to its display in print. After Darwin received all of the replies to
  • exceptyesorno.” “The same state of mindDarwin would later assert in Expression of the
  • Barber, Mary E. [after Feb 1867] [Grahamstown, Cape
  • Blair, R.H. 11 July 1871 Worcester College for the
  • Ceylon enclosed in letter from G.H.K. Thwaites
  • will forward query Huxley, H.A. 22 Mar
  • Aborigines Lane, H.B. 13 Aug 1868
  • head forward Mivart, G.J. 26 Jan 1871
  • aborigines Thwaites, G.H.K. 1 Apr 1868
  • Kanara), Bombay, India forwarded by H.N.B. Erskine

Darwin in letters, 1879: Tracing roots

Summary

Darwin spent a considerable part of 1879 in the eighteenth century. His journey back in time started when he decided to publish a biographical account of his grandfather Erasmus Darwin to accompany a translation of an essay on Erasmus’s evolutionary ideas…

Matches: 16 hits

  • There are summaries of all Darwin's letters from the year 1879 on this website.  The full texts
  • 27 of the print edition of The correspondence of Charles Darwin , published by Cambridge
  • to publish a biographical account of his grandfather Erasmus Darwin to accompany a translation of an
  • the sensitivity of the tips. Despite this breakthrough, when Darwin first mentioned the book to his
  • … ( letter to W. T. Thiselton-Dyer, [after 26] July [1879] ). From July, Darwin had an additional
  • … ‘a dismal time’ ( letter to Henry Johnson, 24 September 1879 ). He may have been consoled to learn
  • pear’ ( enclosure in letter from R. W. Dixon, 20 December 1879 ). The year ended with the start of
  • with the when & the where, & the who—’ ( letter from V. H. Darwin, 28 May [1879] ). On the
  • tastefully and well, and with little fatigue’ ( letter to G. H. Darwin, 12 July 1879 , and
  • to W. T. Thiselton-Dyer, 5 June 1879 , and letter to G. H. Darwin, 12 July 1879 ). Darwins
  • wait for three months. ‘Nothing can be more useless than T.Hs conduct’, Emma Darwin pointed out, …
  • to get home ‘& began drumming at once’ (Emma Darwin to H. E. Litchfield, [27 August 1879] (DAR
  • … & I may not be equal to the exertion’ ( letter to H. A. Pitman, [13 May 1879] ). In the end, …
  • because it dominated the picture (letter from Emma Darwin to H. E. Litchfield, [17 July 1879] (DAR
  • and his family to the Riviera for the summer ( letter to G. J. Romanes, 23 July 1879 ). Allen, who
  • to their engagement being made public ( letter from T. H. Farrer, 12 October 1879 ). Darwins

Darwin in letters, 1876: In the midst of life

Summary

1876 was the year in which the Darwins became grandparents for the first time.  And tragically lost their daughter-in-law, Amy, who died just days after her son's birth.  All the letters from 1876 are now published in volume 24 of The Correspondence…

Matches: 18 hits

  • I cannot bear to think of the future The year 1876 started out sedately enough with
  • games. ‘I have won, hurrah, hurrah, 2795 games’, Darwin boasted; ‘my wifepoor creature, has won
  • regarding the ailments that were so much a feature of Darwin family life. But the calm was not to
  • four days later. ‘I cannot bear to think of the future’, Darwin confessed to William on 11
  • in him fornew matter’ (letter to Asa Gray, 28 January 1876). The preparation of the second edition
  • Climbing plants ( letter from R. F. Cooke, 23 February 1876 ). When Smith, Elder and Company
  • observed to Carus. ( Letter to J. V. Carus, 24 April 1876. ) Darwin focused instead on the
  • … ‘advantages of crossing’ (letter to Asa Gray, 28 January 1876). Revising Orchids was less a
  • results in this years experiments’ ( letter from G. J. Romanes, [ c . 19 March 1876] ). A less
  • Encyclopaedia Britannica the previous year ( letter to G. H. Darwin, [after 4 September 1876] ). …
  • theawful jobof informing the author ( letter to G. G. Stokes, 21 April [1876] ). Darwin could
  • … ‘all I can say is do not commit suicide’ ( letter to G. H. Darwin, [4 June 1876] ). By midsummer, …
  • a set of sons I have, all doing wonders.’ ( Letter to G. H. Darwin, 13 July [1876]. ) A
  • and eczema, was able to rest his mind ( letter to G. H. Darwin, 2 May [1876] ). Darwin even
  • letter to Andrew Clark, [late June 1876] ; letter to G. H. Darwin, 13 July [1876] ). The irony
  • she confided to Henrietta (letter from Emma Darwin to H. E. Litchfield, [31 August 1876] (DAR 219.9: …
  • been the subject of mere observation’ ( letter from T. H. Farrer, 31 December 1876 ). The Swiss
  • on the method, or remains in utter darkness’ ( letter to H. N. Moseley, 22 November 1876 ). …

Women’s scientific participation

Summary

Observers | Fieldwork | Experimentation | Editors and critics | Assistants Darwin’s correspondence helps bring to light a community of women who participated, often actively and routinely, in the nineteenth-century scientific community. Here is a…

Matches: 19 hits

  • … |  Editors and critics  |  Assistants Darwins correspondence helps bring to light a
  • community. Here is a selection of letters exchanged between Darwin and his workforce of women
  • Observers Women: Letter 1194 - Darwin to Whitby, M. A. T., [12 August
  • peculiarities in inheritance. Letter 3787 - Darwin, H. E. to Darwin, [29 October
  • garden. Letter 4523 - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, [6 June 1864] Darwins
  • Letter 5745 - Barber, M. E. to Darwin, [after February 1867] Mary Barber responds to
  • Letter 6736 - Gray, A. & J. L to Darwin, [8 & 9 May 1869] Jane Loring Gray, …
  • Letter 7223 - Darwin to Wedgwood, L. C., [8 June 1867 - 72] Darwin asks his niece, …
  • birds. Letter 5817 - Darwin to Huxley, T. H., [30 January 1868] Darwin
  • Letter 6535 - Vaughan Williams , M. S. to Darwin, H. E., [after 14 October 1869] …
  • patience”. Letter 4242 - Hildebrand, F. H. G. to Darwin, [16 July 1863] …
  • Women: Letter 1701 - Morris, M. H. to Prior, R. C. A., [17 June 1855] …
  • Letter 4823  - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, H. E., [May 1865] Darwins niece, Lucy, …
  • Leith Hill Place. Letter 6139  - Doubleday, H. to Darwin, [22 April 1868] …
  • Letter 8168 - Ruck, A. R . to Darwin, H., [20 January 1872] Amy Ruck reports the
  • for more samples. Letter 4928  - Henslow, G. to Darwin, [11 November 1865] …
  • … “eyebrows”. Letter 1701  - Morris, M. H. to Prior, R. C. A., [17 June 1855] …
  • Letter 5254  - Hildebrand, F. H. G. to Darwin, [23 October 1866] German botanist
  • job. Letter 9157  - Darwin to Da rwin, G. H., [20 November 1873] Darwin

Darwin in letters, 1868: Studying sex

Summary

The quantity of Darwin’s correspondence increased dramatically in 1868 due largely to his ever-widening research on human evolution and sexual selection.Darwin’s theory of sexual selection as applied to human descent led him to investigate aspects of the…

Matches: 17 hits

  • …   On 6 March 1868, Darwin wrote to the entomologist and accountant John Jenner Weir, ‘If
  • he ought to do what I am doing pester them with letters.’ Darwin was certainly true to his word. The
  • and sexual selection. In  Origin , pp. 8790, Darwin had briefly introduced the concept of
  • the mating process. In a letter to Alfred Russel Wallace in 1864, Darwin claimed that sexual
  • to the stridulation of crickets. At the same time, Darwin continued to collect material on
  • and his immediate circle of friends and relations. In July 1868 Darwin was still anticipating that
  • which was devoted to sexual selection in the animal kingdom. Darwin described his thirst for
  • a little and not too much’ ( letter to Albert Günther, 15 May [1868] ). My book is
  • been advertised by the publisher John Murray as early as 1865, the two-volume work appeared in
  • 1867 and had expected to complete it in a fortnight. But at Darwins request, he modified his
  • the text. This increased the amount of work substantially. Darwin asked Murray to intervene, …
  • classes, a dim ray of light may be gained’ ( letter to H. T. Stainton, 21 February [1868] ). From
  • of the caudicle of  Ophrys muscifera  (letters from T. H. Farrer, 17 May 1868 and 18 May
  • to oneselfis no slight gain’ ( letter from T. H. Farrer, 17 September 1868 ). Darwin continued
  • induced him to stay away ( letter from S. J. OH. Horsman, 2 June [1868] ). But if Horsman
  • at the shrine of D r . Darwin’ ( letter from T. H. Huxley, 20 July 1868 ). Darwin received a
  • and evenpreached  against’ ( letter from G. D. Hinrichs, [before 13 August 1868] ). Finally, …

Darwin’s reading notebooks

Summary

In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he wished to read in Notebook C (Notebooks, pp. 319–28). In 1839, these lists were copied and continued in separate notebooks. The first of these reading notebooks (DAR 119…

Matches: 24 hits

  • In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he
  • to read in Notebook C ( Notebooks , pp. 31928). In 1839, these lists were copied and continued in
  • used these notebooks extensively in dating and annotating Darwins letters; the full transcript
  • … *128). For clarity, the transcript does not record Darwins alterations. The spelling and
  • book had been consulted. Those cases where it appears that Darwin made a genuine deletion have been
  • a few instances, primarily in theBooks Readsections, Darwin recorded that a work had been
  • of the books listed in the other two notebooks. Sometimes Darwin recorded that an abstract of the
  • own. Soon after beginning his first reading notebook, Darwin began to separate the scientific
  • 1820] in Geolog. Soc. F. Cuvier on Instinct [F. G. Cuvier 1822] read Flourens Edit [Flourens
  • 1830]— account of wild cattle Montagu on birds [G. Montagu 180213]— facts about close
  • Davy 1828] 31 An analysis of British Ferns. G. W. Francis 4 s  [Francis 1837]— …
  • Hist of Music [Hogarth 1835] Wilkinson Ægyptian [J. G. Wilkinson 183741] read [DAR
  • dConsiderations generales sur les Mammif. Isid. G. St. Hilaire. 1826? [I. Geoffroy Saint
  • Head [F. B. Head 1846] St. Johns Highlands [C. W. G. Saint John 1846] History of
  • Naturelle” (Cuvier Paper on Domestication) [F. G. Cuvier 1825] Agricolas Husbandry (to see
  • … (Gerard Hybrids [Gérard 1844]) Bought (read) G. St. Hilaire Progress de un Naturalist
  • 8] 1854 Jan 15. Seemans Narrative of H.M.S. Herald [Seeman 1853]. Feb 6. …
  • Belcher, Edward. 1848Narrative of the voyage of H.M.S.   Samarang during the years 184346; …
  • Narrative of a voyage round the world, performed in H.M.S.   Sulphur,   183642 . 2 vols. …
  • … . Pt 1 of  The botany of the   Antarctic voyage of H.M. Discovery Ships   Erebus and Terror in
  • Beete. 1847Narrative of the surveying voyage   of H.M.S. Flyin the Torres Strait, New
  • Keppel, Henry. 1846The expedition to Borneo of H.M.S.   Dido for the suppression of piracy; …
  • … ——. 1853A visit to the Indian Archipelago, in H.M.S.   Mæander, with portions of the private
  • Macgillivray, John. 1852Narrative of the voyage of   H.M.S. Rattlesnake, commanded by the late

Origin: the lost changes for the second German edition

Summary

Darwin sent a list of changes made uniquely to the second German edition of Origin to its translator, Heinrich Georg Bronn.  That lost list is recreated here.

Matches: 9 hits

  • In March 1862, Heinrich Georg Bronn wrote to Darwin stating his intention to prepare a second German
  • in the new edition; in his letter to Bronn of 25 April [1862 ], he mentioned that he was sending
  • with the alterations from the second edition. In addition, Darwin referred toa few new M.S. …
  • has not been found, although they were returned to Darwin for possible use in a new American edition
  • should correspond to the additional alterations sent by Darwin to Bronn. Many of these additions and
  • in the fourth English edition, which appeared in 1866.   The changes and additions have been
  • line number.     Page xiv, par. 1, line 1, insert beforeGeoffroy’: 1   …
  • not for what they are used.    Page xiv, n., line 10, delete ‘(as we shall immediately see)’. …
  • …  A well-known French botanist, MLecoq, writes in 1854 (‘Etudes sur Géograph. Bot.,’ tom. Ip250

Darwin in letters, 1867: A civilised dispute

Summary

Charles Darwin’s major achievement in 1867 was the completion of his large work, The variation of animals and plants under domestication (Variation). The importance of Darwin’s network of correspondents becomes vividly apparent in his work on expression in…

Matches: 19 hits

  • …   Charles Darwins major achievement in 1867 was the completion of his large workThe
  • had been delivered to the publisher in the final week of 1866. It would take all of 1867 to correct
  • selection in relation to sex  ( Descent ), published in 1871, and the chapter on expression into
  • in man and animals  ( Expression ), published in 1872. Although Darwin had been collecting
  • A global reputation The importance of Darwins network of correspondents becomes vividly
  • Variation  would be based on proof-sheets received as Darwin corrected them. Closer to home, two
  • Charles Fleeming Jenkin, challenged different aspects of Darwins theory of transmutation as
  • orchids are fertilised by insects  ( Orchids ). While Darwin privately gave detailed opinions of
  • capable hands of Alfred Russel Wallace. At the same time, Darwin was persuaded by some German
  • were becoming counterproductive. Throughout the year, Darwin continued to discuss now
  • transmutation theory. Three important new correspondents in 1867 were Hermann Müller and Anton Dohrn
  • tedious dull workThomas Henry Huxley sent Darwin the New Years greeting, ‘may you be
  • part of his long-delayedbig book’, started in January 1860, and advertised in the press since 1865
  • publisher, John Murray, he wrote to Murray on 3 January 1867 , ‘I cannot tell you how sorry I am
  • for selling a Book’ ( letter to John Murray, 31 January [1867] ). A week later, Darwin had
  • the additional chapter. In a letter written on 8 February [1867] to his close friend, Joseph
  • George Douglas Campbell, published  The reign of law  (G. D. Campbell 1867), a book based on a
  • … ‘I hear he is down on both of us’ ( letter from T. H. Huxley, [before 7 January 1867] ). In
  • …  for this month; except on wet days’ ( letter from H. B. Jones, 1 October [1867] ). There is no

Darwin in letters, 1874: A turbulent year

Summary

The year 1874 was one of consolidation, reflection, and turmoil for Darwin. He spent the early months working on second editions of Coral reefs and Descent of man; the rest of the year was mostly devoted to further research on insectivorous plants. A…

Matches: 20 hits

  • The year 1874 was one of consolidation, reflection, and turmoil for Darwin. He spent the early
  • dispute over an anonymous review that attacked the work of Darwins son George dominated the second
  • been the naturalist and traveller Alexander von Humboldts 105th birthday, Darwin obliged with a
  • intervals’ ( letter to D. T. Gardner, [ c . 27 August 1874] ). The death of a Cambridge friend, …
  • and collecting beetles ( letter from W. D. Fox, 8 May [1874] ).  Such reminiscences led Darwin to
  • backwards much more than forwards’ ( letter to W. D. Fox, 11 May [1874] ). I feel
  • Andrew Clark, whom he had been consulting since August 1873. Darwin had originally thought that
  • Williams wasa cheat and an imposter’ ( letter from T. H. Huxley, 27 January 1874 ). Darwin
  • he was thus free to perform his antics’ ( letter to T. H. Huxley, 29 January [1874] ). This did
  • alloweda spirit séanceat his home ( letter from T. G. Appleton, 2 April 1874 ). Back
  • sweetly all the horrid bother of correction’ ( letter to H. E. Litchfield, 21 [March 1874] ). The
  • I have pounded the enemy into a jelly’ ( letter from T. H. Huxley, 14 April 1874 ). The technical
  • and never mind where it goes’ ( letter from T. H. Huxley, 16 April 1874 ). The second
  • conciseness & clearness of your thought’ ( letter from G. H. Darwin, 20 April 1874 ). …
  • the spread of various mental and physical disorders (G. H. Darwin 1873b). In July 1874, an anonymous
  • over thescurrilous libelon his son ( letter to G. H. Darwin, [27 July 1874] ).  George, …
  • scurrilous accusation of [a] lying scoundrel’ ( letter to G. H. Darwin, 1 August [1874] ). He
  • with Murray on the outcome ( enclosure to letter from G. H. Darwin, 6 [August] 1874 ): …
  • direct to the Editor & it had been refused’ ( letter from G. H. Darwin, [6 or 7 August 1874] ) …
  • Mivart (see  Correspondence  vol. 20, letter to St G. J. Mivart, 11 January [1872] ). To Darwin

The Lyell–Lubbock dispute

Summary

In May 1865 a dispute arose between John Lubbock and Charles Lyell when Lubbock, in his book Prehistoric times, accused Lyell of plagiarism. The dispute caused great dismay among many of their mutual scientific friends, some of whom took immediate action…

Matches: 20 hits

  • In May 1865 a dispute arose between John Lubbock and Charles Lyell when Lubbock, in
  • of whom took immediate action to mediate a solution. Charles Darwin had close ties with both men and
  • …  In the concluding paragraphs of Origin , Darwin had predicted that arevolution in natural
  • found acceptance at the time Origin was published. In 1836, Jacques Boucher de Perthes had found
  • been supposed, but his views were generally derided. 1  In 1859, Lyell visited several
  • that these were indeed implements of early humans (C. Lyell 1859). In September 1860 he visited
  • … ( Correspondence vol. 8, letter to Charles Lyell, 4 May [1860] and n. 3; Hutchinson 1914, 1: 51). …
  • evidence to establish the age of the human race.  In 1861, Lubbock joined Thomas Henry Huxley
  • aspects of the book. Throughout the first half of 1863, Darwin discussed the book in correspondence
  • spoke out publicly about any controversial aspect.  Darwins chief complaint about the book
  • he thought aboutthe derivation of Species’. 8 Darwin continued to feel aggrieved about
  • to the Athenæum . 9  In the same letter, Darwin touched on an area of public
  • accusation, which had just appeared in the Athenæum . Darwin had not advised Falconer personally, …
  • 11 In the same review Lubbock expressed publicly what Darwin had said privately; that is, that
  • given thatthe whole tenor of his argumentsupported Darwins theory ([Lubbock] 1863b, p. 213). …
  • of all three letters to a number of friends, including Darwin. 22 Just before he
  • Falconers attack on Charles Lyell, see Bynum 1984 and L. G. Wilson 1996. 6. Owens
  • MSS 49640). Another portion of this letter is quoted in L. G. Wilson 1996. 13. For two
  • vol. 14, doc. 1834). 15. Letter from T. H. Huxley, 7 March 1865, in BL MSS ADD 49641. …
  • Athenaeum , 4 April 1863, pp. 459-60Forchhammer, Get al . 18515Undersgelser i

Darwin's 1874 letters go online

Summary

The full transcripts and footnotes of over 600 letters to and from Charles Darwin in 1874 are published online for the first time. You can read about Darwin's life in 1874 through his letters and see a full list of the letters. The 1874 letters…

Matches: 9 hits

  • and footnotes of over 600 letters to and from Charles Darwin in 1874 are published online for
  • licentiousness’. After re-reading what George had written, Darwin wrote:   I cannot
  • of [a] lying scoundrel.—  ( Letter to GHDarwin, 1 August [1874] ) The
  • behaviour in scientific society. Find out more about how Darwin and his family and friends dealt
  • WDFox, 11 May [1874] ) At the age of 65, Darwin had reflective moments, although his
  • Letter to DFNevill, 18 September [1874] ) Darwins family continued to prosper. His
  • … ‘I am sure he will never voluntarily be idle’, wrote Darwin to the directors, fearing that Horace
  • career, married Amy Ruck and came to live in Down village as Darwins secretary. I
  • Letter to JDHooker, 30 November [1874] ) Darwins continuing loyalty to his friends

Darwin in letters, 1875: Pulling strings

Summary

‘I am getting sick of insectivorous plants’, Darwin confessed in January 1875. He had worked on the subject intermittently since 1859, and had been steadily engaged on a book manuscript for nine months; January also saw the conclusion of a bitter dispute…

Matches: 17 hits

  • Editions Plants always held an important place in Darwins theorising about species, and
  • relief during his periods of severe illness. Yet on 15 January 1875 , Darwin confessed to his
  • way to continuous writing and revision, activities that Darwin found less gratifying: ‘I am slaving
  • bad.’ The process was compounded by the fact that Darwin was also revising another manuscript
  • preparing new Editions’, he complained again to Hooker on 18 August. Finally, by autumn, he
  • coloured stamens.’ At intervals during the year, Darwin was diverted from the onerous task of
  • zoologist St George Jackson Mivart. In April and early May, Darwin was occupied with a heated
  • than insectivorous plants. As he confessed to Hooker on 12 December , ‘I have not felt so angry
  • chapter of the controversy involved a slanderous attack upon Darwins son George, in an anonymous
  • from his family, he sent a curt note to Mivart on 12 January , breaking off all future
  • Society of London, and a secretary of the Linnean Society, Darwins friends had to find ways of
  • mouthpiece ofJesuitical Rome’ ( Academy , 2 January 1875, pp. 1617). ‘How grandly you have
  • in public. ‘Without cutting him direct’, he advised Darwin on 7 January , ‘I should avoid him, …
  • shuddered again & again’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 16 January 1875 ). Darwin had also
  • for vengeance is now quite Satisfied’, he told Hooker on 17 January , ‘I feel now like a pure
  • red half has become wholly white’ ( letter from G. J. Romanes, [before 4 November 1874] ).   …
  • of a review of William Dwight Whitneys work on language (G. H. Darwin 1874c). George had taken the

Darwin in letters, 1878: Movement and sleep

Summary

In 1878, Darwin devoted most of his attention to the movements of plants. He investigated the growth pattern of roots and shoots, studying the function of specific organs in this process. Working closely with his son Francis, Darwin devised a series of…

Matches: 11 hits

  • … is to lessen injury to leaves from radiation In 1878, Darwin devoted most of his …
  • … in this process. Working closely with his son Francis, Darwin devised a series of experiments to …
  • … plant laboratories in Europe. While Francis was away, Darwin delighted in his role as …
  • … from botanical research was provided by potatoes, as Darwin took up the cause of an Irish …
  • … would rid Ireland of famine. Several correspondents pressed Darwin for his views on religion, …
  • … closed with remarkable news of a large legacy bequeathed to Darwin by a stranger as a reward for his …
  • … and Expression ), and the final revision of Origin (1872), Darwin had turned almost …
  • … plants.’ Movement in plants In the spring of 1878, Darwin started to focus on the …
  • … were enrolled as researchers, as were family members. Darwin asked his niece Sophy to observe …
  • … come up arched’ ( letter to Sophy Wedgwood, 24 March [1878–80] ). While Darwin was studying the …
  • … of adding a new member to society’ ( letter from G. A. Gaskell, 13 November 1878 ). Darwin hoped …

Women as a scientific audience

Summary

Target audience? | Female readership | Reading Variation Darwin's letters, in particular those exchanged with his editors and publisher, reveal a lot about his intended audience. Regardless of whether or not women were deliberately targeted as a…

Matches: 9 hits

  • … Female readership | Reading Variation Darwin's letters, in particular those …
  • … a broad variety of women had access to, and engaged with, Darwin's published works. A set of …
  • … women a target audience? Letter 2447 - Darwin to Murray, J., [5 April 1859] …
  • … that his views are original and will appeal to the public. Darwin asks Murray to forward the …
  • … and criticisms of style. Letter 2461 - Darwin to Hooker, J. D., [11 May 1859] …
  • … readers. Letter 7124 - Darwin to Darwin, H. E., [8 February 1870] Darwin …
  • … Letter 7331 - Darwin to Murray, J., [29 September 1870] Darwin asks Murray to …
  • … Letter 8335 - Reade, W. W. to Darwin, [16 May 1872] Reade tells Darwin of his …
  • … Letter 7651 - Wedgwood, F. J. to Darwin, H. E., [1 April 1871] Frances Wedgwood …

Henrietta Darwin's diary

Summary

Darwin's daughter Henrietta kept a diary for a few momentous weeks in 1871. This was the year in which Descent of Man, the most controversial of her father's books after Origin itself, appeared, a book which she had helped him write. The small…

Matches: 11 hits

  • Charles Darwins daughter Henrietta wrote the following journal entries in March and July 1871 in a
  • excised within it, presumably by Henrietta herself. Darwins letters in 1870 and 1871 ( …
  • scepticism; many of her arguments are reminiscent of Darwins own discussion of religious belief in
  • missions due to take place between 26 February and 5 March 1871 in four towns within the deanery of
  • Origin at the Oxford meeting of the British Association in 1860. In the second entry, …
  • of the theory of natural selection. Snow occasionally sent Darwin information relating to his
  • one of  Descent  (see letter from Charles and Emma Darwin to F. J. Wedgwood, [March 1871?], and
  • period of their courtship. We are grateful to William Darwin for permission to publish the
  • University Library. Henrietta Darwin | March 1871 1871 MarchSea Grove
  • Had a long talk w Sno on education first in which Sno quoted G. Eliot apropos of fanaticismthat the
  • gone—& then came my telegram & I feared so to find from G. Lushingtons. 12 I think he

Darwin as mentor

Summary

Darwin provided advice, encouragement and praise to his fellow scientific 'labourers' of both sexes. Selected letters Letter 2234 - Darwin to Unidentified, [5 March 1858] Darwin advises that Professor C. P. Smyth’s observations are not…

Matches: 11 hits

  • Darwin provided advice, encouragement and praise to his fellow scientific …
  • … Selected letters Letter 2234 - Darwin to Unidentified, [5 March 1858] Darwin …
  • … on insufficient grounds. Letter 3934 - Darwin to Scott, J., [21 January 1863] …
  • … material worthy of publication. Letter 4185 - Darwin to Scott, J., [25 & 28 May …
  • … worker you are!”. Letter 7605 - Darwin to Darwin, H. E., [20 March 1871] …
  • … “lucid vigorous style”. In consultation with Emma, Darwin offers Henrietta “some little memorial” in …
  • … so many observations without aid. Letter 8146 - Darwin to Treat, M., [5 January 1872] …
  • … Letter 8171 - Darwin to Wedgwood, L., [21 January 1872] Darwin thanks his niece for the …
  • … Letter 9005b - Darwin to Treat, M., [12 August 1873] Darwin thanks Treat for sending over …
  • … the experiment. Letter 9580 - Darwin to Darwin, G. H. D., [1 August 1874] …
  • … work”. Letter 11096 - Darwin to Romanes, G. J., [9 August 1877] Darwin points …

Darwin's in letters, 1873: Animal or vegetable?

Summary

Having laboured for nearly five years on human evolution, sexual selection, and the expression of emotions, Darwin was able to devote 1873 almost exclusively to his beloved plants. He resumed work on the digestive powers of sundews and Venus fly traps, and…

Matches: 21 hits

  • evolution, sexual selection, and the expression of emotions, Darwin was able to devote 1873 almost
  • would culminate in two booksInsectivorous plants  (1875) and  Cross and self fertilisation  …
  • career to become his fathers scientific secretary. Darwin had always relied on assistance from
  • Franciss decision. A large portion of the letters Darwin received in 1873 were in response
  • the previous year. As was typical, readers wrote to Darwin personally to offer suggestions, …
  • some of which were incorporated in a later edition. Darwin also contributed to discussions in the
  • Francis Galtons work on inherited talent, which prompted Darwin to reflect on the traits and
  • Station at Naples. Plants that eat and feel? Darwin had resumed experiments on the
  • which I ought to have observed” ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 12 January [1873] ).  Drosera  was the
  • on itroot leaf & branch!” ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 12 January 1873 ). Darwin found
  • by its odour, likea baited trap” ( ibid ., p. 17). Through a series of painstaking experiments, …
  • flower would become modified & correlated” ( letter to T. H. Farrer, 14 August 1873 ). …
  • throat like a bulldog” ( letter from L. M. Forster to H. E. Litchfield, 20 February 1873 ). The
  • it would offend his father ( enclosure to letter from T. H. Huxley, 3 December 1873 ).  In
  • to us to the last day of our lives” ( letter to T. H. Huxley, 23 April 1873 ). Huxley was
  • been without