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Darwin in letters, 1865: Delays and disappointments

Summary

The year was marked by three deaths of personal significance to Darwin: Hugh Falconer, a friend and supporter; Robert FitzRoy, captain of the Beagle; and William Jackson Hooker, director of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, and father of Darwin’s friend…

Matches: 22 hits

  • In 1865, the chief work on Charles Darwins mind was the writing of  The
  • However, several smaller projects came to fruition in 1865, including the publication of his long
  • letters on climbing plants to make another paper. Darwin also submitted a manuscript of his
  • protégé, John Scott, who was now working in India. Darwins transmutation theory continued to
  • Argyll, appeared in the religious weeklyGood Words . Darwin received news of an exchange of
  • Butler, and, according to Butler, the bishop of Wellington. Darwins theory was discussed at an
  • in the  GardenersChronicleAt the end of the year, Darwin was elected an honorary member of
  • year was marked by three deaths of personal significance to Darwin: Hugh Falconer, a friend of
  • in August. There was also a serious dispute between two of Darwins friends, John Lubbock and
  • of Hugh Falconer Darwins first letter to Hooker of 1865 suggests that the family had had a
  • the house jolly’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 7 January [1865] ). Darwin was ready to submit his
  • letter from Hugh Falconer to Erasmus Alvey Darwin, 3 January 1865 ). Erasmus forwarded his letters
  • laboured in vain’ ( letter to Hugh Falconer, 6 January [1865] ). Sic transit gloria
  • the world goes.—’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 2 February [1865] ). However, Hooker, at the time
  • are unalloyed’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 3 February 1865 ). Darwin, nowhauntedby
  • with a vengeance’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 9 February [1865] ). Continuing ill-health
  • to try anyone’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 7 January [1865] ). He particularly hated being ill
  • of life. He wrote to Charles Lyell on 22 January [1865] , ‘unfortunately reading makes my head
  • it up by early July ( see letter to J. D. Hooker, [10 July 1865] ). In July, he consulted
  • attending school, and spent some time travelling in Europe (Emma Darwins diary (DAR 242),  Emma
  • people werent so foolish’;. In November, Darwin and Emma visited Erasmus in London ( …
  • frequently, and Hooker also came for a short stay in March (Emma Darwins diary, DAR 242). A

Darwin's notes for his physician, 1865

Summary

On 20 May 1865, Emma Darwin recorded in her diary that John Chapman, a prominent London publisher who had studied medicine in London and Paris in the early 1840s, visited Down to consult with Darwin about his ill health. In 1863 Chapman started to treat…

Matches: 10 hits

  • On 20 May 1865, Emma Darwin recorded in her diary that John Chapman, a prominent London
  • and Paris in the early 1840s, visited Down to consult with Darwin about his ill health. In 1863
  • Chapman wasnt the first medical practitioner Darwin contacted around this timeIn 1863, Darwin
  • however, his health grew worse.  In hisJournal’, Darwin wrote that he fell ill again on 22 April
  • more attacks of vomiting and seeking another opinion, Darwin wrote to ChapmanOn the day that
  • adult life (the section, ‘I feel nearlyfood’, is in Emma Darwins hand). Darwin began the
  • given up the treatment (see letter from Charles and Emma Darwin to J. D. Hooker, [10 July 1865]). …
  • and George Busk (see letter to J. D. Hooker, [7 January 1865], and letter from George Busk, 28 April
  • D. Hooker, 26[-7] March [1864] ( Correspondence vol. 12), Darwin remarked that Jenner had found
  • Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library, Darwin Evolution Collection (3314) and is

The Lyell–Lubbock dispute

Summary

In May 1865 a dispute arose between John Lubbock and Charles Lyell when Lubbock, in his book Prehistoric times, accused Lyell of plagiarism. The dispute caused great dismay among many of their mutual scientific friends, some of whom took immediate action…

Matches: 22 hits

  • In May 1865 a dispute arose between John Lubbock and Charles Lyell when Lubbock, in
  • of whom took immediate action to mediate a solution. Charles Darwin had close ties with both men and
  • …  In the concluding paragraphs of Origin , Darwin had predicted that arevolution in natural
  • Thomas Henry Huxley, Busk, and several other supporters of Darwin in editing the Natural History
  • basis of Lubbocks book, Prehistoric times (Lubbock 1865).  By 1860, Lyell had begun work
  • material available pertaining to the antiquity of humans. In 1865, he wrote that the section on
  • aspects of the book. Throughout the first half of 1863, Darwin discussed the book in correspondence
  • spoke out publicly about any controversial aspect.  Darwins chief complaint about the book
  • he thought aboutthe derivation of Species’. 8 Darwin continued to feel aggrieved about
  • to the Athenæum . 9  In the same letter, Darwin touched on an area of public
  • accusation, which had just appeared in the Athenæum . Darwin had not advised Falconer personally, …
  • 11 In the same review Lubbock expressed publicly what Darwin had said privately; that is, that
  • given thatthe whole tenor of his argumentsupported Darwins theory ([Lubbock] 1863b, p. 213). …
  • not pursue any grievance against Lyell until the spring of 1865. 13  In the course of
  • C. Lyell 1863c and Lubbock 1861 (and consequently in Lubbock 1865), combined with the wording of
  • between the end of February and the beginning of March 1865, Lubbock wrote the note which would
  • received a copy of Lubbocks book, published in mid-May 1865, he immediately wrote to express his
  • Ramsay in a note to an article published in the April 1865 issue of the Philosophical Magazine . …
  • of all three letters to a number of friends, including Darwin. 22 Just before he
  • thought of the affair ( letter from J. D. Hooker, [2 June 1865] ). Hooker, for his part, could see
  • for Lubbocks book ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [4 June 1865] ). A week later he sent Lubbock a
  • Hooker, [31 May 1865] and n. 1. 23. Letter from Emma Darwin to Henrietta Emma Darwin, …

Darwin's health

Summary

On 28 March 1849, ten years before Origin was published, Darwin wrote to his good friend Joseph Hooker from Great Malvern in Worcestershire, where Dr James Manby Gully ran a fashionable water-cure establishment. Darwin apologised for his delayed reply to…

Matches: 18 hits

  • March 1849, ten years before  Origin  was published, Darwin wrote to his good friend Joseph Hooker
  • Manby Gully ran a fashionable water-cure establishment. Darwin apologised for his delayed reply to
  • See the letter At various periods in his life Darwin suffered from gastrointestinal
  • fatigue, trembling, faintness, and dizziness. In 1849, Darwins symptoms became so severe that he
  • for three months while he took Dr Gullys water cure. In Darwins letter to Hooker, he described Dr
  • See the letter After returning from Malvern, Darwin continued his hydropathic
  • 1863. In a letter to Hooker in April of 1861for example, Darwin used his delicate physiology to
  • Edward Wickstead Lane, and at Ilkley with Dr Edmund Smith, Darwin sought advice from his consulting
  • of a fashionable spinal ice treatment. In April 1864, Darwin attributed his improved health to Dr
  • to JDHooker, 13 April [1864] ) Why was Darwins so ill? Historians and others have
  • that there were psychological or psychosomatic dimensions to Darwins most severe periods of crisis. …
  • almost daily (see Correspondence vol. 12, letter from Emma Darwin to W. D. Fox, [6 May 1864] …
  • threw up food.  In his letter to Chapman of 16 May [1865] , Darwin stated that his sickness was
  • 38, 47, 64). Fainting androckinghad been recorded in Emma Darwins diary (DAR 242) on several
  • sensationshas been found. On Darwins reliance on Emma Darwins companionship and care see, for
  • alive’. See also Correspondence vol. 12, letter from Emma Darwin to J. D. Hooker, 17 March
  • October 1863 (see Correspondence vol. 11, letter from Emma Darwin to W. D. Fox, 8 December
  • of chalk, magnesia, and other antacids in March 1864 (see Emma Darwins diary, DAR 242, and n. 8, …

Fake Darwin: myths and misconceptions

Summary

Many myths have persisted about Darwin's life and work. Here are a few of the more pervasive ones, with full debunking below...

Matches: 1 hits

  • … Many myths have persisted about Darwin's life and work. Here are a few of the more pervasive …

'An Appeal' against animal cruelty

Summary

The four-page pamphlet transcribed below and entitled 'An Appeal', was composed jointly by Emma and Charles Darwin (see letter from Emma Darwin to W. D. Fox, [29 September 1863]). The pamphlet, which protested against the cruelty of steel vermin…

Matches: 10 hits

  • … below and entitled 'An Appeal', was composed jointly by Emma and Charles Darwin (see …
  • … of steel vermin-traps, was privately printed in July, and Emma organised the distribution of the …
  • … 1872, pp. 99–100, 1 April 1874, p. 56). Charles and Emma distributed the 'Appeal' …
  • … that a prize should be offered for a humane trap, and Emma accordingly sent out papers for …
  • … for distributing the 'cruelty pamphlet', and letter from Emma Darwin to W. D. Fox, 8 …
  • … finding a better design in the future (RSPCA Annual Report 1865, p. 20). The competition was held …
  • … paper Animal World , and prominently linked Charles Darwin"s name to the offer of a prize …
  • … had little direct effect (Moss 1961, pp. 146–7, Emma Darwin 2: 200). Although the RSPCA …
  • … than the possible alternatives (see letter from E. L. Darwin, 7 September 1863, letter from Emma
  • … in 1877 ( Spectator , 6 January 1877, p. 15, and Emma Darwin 2: 200–1). While Emma

Evolution: Selected Letters of Charles Darwin 1860-1870

Summary

This selection of Charles Darwin’s letters includes correspondence with his friends and scientific colleagues around the world; letters by the critics who tried to stamp out his ideas, and by admirers who helped them to spread. It takes up the story of…

Matches: 13 hits

  • This selection of Charles Darwins letters includes correspondence with his friends and scientific
  • admirers who helped them to spread. It takes up the story of Darwins life in 1860, in the immediate
  • of publication of Descent of Man in 1871. In this period Darwin became a public figure, and the
  • increased accordingly. Letters conveyed public reaction to Darwin, as people who were often complete
  • worked up, or their religious doubts and concerns for Darwins own soul. Darwin himself used letters
  • world a questionnaire on the expression of the emotions. Darwin also continued to confide in his
  • yet been pointed out to me. No doubt many will be. Darwin to Huxley, 1860. …
  • when I know you have been miserably uncomfortable. Emma to Charles Darwin, 1861. …
  • gravitating towards your doctrinesHuxley to Darwin, 1862. I cannot bear
  • what you think about the derivation of SpeciesDarwin to Charles Lyell, 1863. …
  • fairly settled & succeeding in India. John Scott to Darwin, 1864. I
  • was quite out of balance once during our voyageDarwin to Hooker (on hearing of Robert
  • that the necks of your horses are badly galledDarwin to a local landowner, 1866. …

Dramatisation script

Summary

Re: Design – Adaptation of the Correspondence of Charles Darwin, Asa Gray and others… by Craig Baxter – as performed 25 March 2007

Matches: 24 hits

  • Re: DesignAdaptation of the Correspondence of Charles Darwin, Asa Gray and othersby Craig
  • as the creator of this dramatisation, and that of the Darwin Correspondence Project to be identified
  • correspondence or published writings of Asa Gray, Charles Darwin, Joseph Dalton Hooker, Jane Loring
  • Actor 1Asa Gray Actor 2Charles Darwin Actor 3In the dress of a modern day
  • Louis Agassiz, Adam Sedgwick, A Friend of John Stuart Mill, Emma Darwin, Horace Darwinand acts as
  • the play unfolds and acting as a go-between between Gray and Darwin, and between the audience and
  • this, he sends out copies of his Review of the Life of Darwin. At this time in his life, Asa
  • friends in England, copies of hisReview of the Life of Darwin’… pencilling the address so that it
  • Joseph D Hooker GRAY:   3   Charles Darwinmade his home on the border of the little
  • are kept in check by a constitutional weakness. DARWIN: A plain but comfortable brick
  • by every blessing except that of vigorous healthDARWIN4   My confounded stomach
  • pursuits and the simplicity of his character. DARWIN:   5   I am allowed to work now
  • own house, where he was the most charming of hosts. DARWIN:   6   My life goes on
  • being a part of [an unpublished] manuscript. Darwin settles down to write. His tone is
  • THE CONCURRENCE OF BOTANISTS: 1855 In which Darwin initiates a long-running correspondence
  • gossip about difficult colleagues (Agassiz). Gray realizes Darwin is not revealing all of his
  • man, more formally attired and lighter on his feet than Darwin. He has many more demands on his time
  • Thank God he will never suffer more in this world. Poor Emma behaved nobly and how she stood it all
  • DARWINMy wifes remark on reading this, was EMMA: Why, you know nothing about Logic. …
  • your darling. BOOKS BY THE LATE CHARLES DARWIN: 1863-1865 In which Drwin struggles
  • I find rather dull. GRAY:   170   1 May 1865Well, ‘treason has done its worstand
  • 5 DECEMBER 1864 170 A GRAY TO RW CHURCH, 1 MAY 1865 171  C DARWIN TO A GRAY
  • 174 FROM A GRAY TO CHARLES DARWIN, 24 JULY 1865 175 A GRAY TO RW CHURCH, 22 JUNE 1868
  • 25 MAY 1868 195 A GRAY TO JD HOOKER, 21 NOV 1865 196  FROM A GRAY 27

Religion

Summary

Design|Personal Belief|Beauty|The Church Perhaps the most notorious realm of controversy over evolution in Darwin's day was religion. The same can be said of the evolution controversy today; however the nature of the disputes and the manner in…

Matches: 13 hits

  • … the most notorious realm of controversy over evolution in Darwin's day was religion. The same …
  • … nineteenth century were different in important ways. Many of Darwin's leading supporters were …
  • … their religious beliefs with evolutionary theory. Darwin's own writing, both in print and …
  • … much as possible. A number of correspondents tried to draw Darwin out on his own religious views, …
  • … political contexts. Design Darwin was not the first to challenge …
  • … on the controversial topic of design. The first is between Darwin and Harvard botanist Asa Gray, …
  • … second is a single letter from naturalist A. R. Wallace to Darwin on design and natural selection. …
  • … of each fragment at the base of my precipice”. Darwin and Wallace Letter 5140 …
  • … of his own family. Letter 441 — Wedgwood, Emma to Darwin, C. R., [21–22 Nov 1838] …
  • … conscientious doubts”. Letter 471 — Darwin, Emma to Darwin, C. R., [c. Feb 1839] …
  • … Letter 4752 — Darwin, C. R. to Lyell, Charles, 22 Jan [1865] Darwin writes to King's …
  • … Letter 4939 — Shaw, James to Darwin, C. R., 20 Nov 1865 Scottish school teacher and writer …
  • … Letter 4943 — Darwin, C. R. to Shaw, James, 30 Nov 1865 Darwin writes to James Shaw. He is …

Women’s scientific participation

Summary

Observers | Fieldwork | Experimentation | Editors and critics | Assistants Darwin’s correspondence helps bring to light a community of women who participated, often actively and routinely, in the nineteenth-century scientific community. Here is a…

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  • … |  Editors and critics  |  Assistants Darwins correspondence helps bring to light a
  • community. Here is a selection of letters exchanged between Darwin and his workforce of women
  • Women: Letter 1194 - Darwin to Whitby, M. A. T., [12 August 1849] Darwin
  • peculiarities in inheritance. Letter 3787 - Darwin, H. E. to Darwin, [29 October
  • garden. Letter 4523 - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, [6 June 1864] Darwins
  • … . Letter 5745 - Barber, M. E. to Darwin, [after February 1867] Mary Barber
  • Letter 6535 - Vaughan Williams , M. S. to Darwin, H. E., [after 14 October 1869] …
  • her observations on the expression of emotion in dogs with Emma Darwin. Letter 8676
  • 1868] Darwins nephew, Edmund, writes to Emma Darwins sister, Sarah, with observations of
  • Darwins nephews, Edmund and Charles, write to Emma Darwins sister, Sarah, with observations of
  • Letter 4823  - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, H. E., [May 1865] Darwins niece, Lucy, …
  • Wedgwood, S. E. & J. to Darwin, [10 November 1837] Emmas sister, Sarah, passes on
  • Letter 4928  - Henslow, G. to Darwin, [11 November 1865] J. S. Henslows son, George, …
  • E. to Darwin, W. E., [January 23rd 1887]: Emma Darwin tells her eldest son, William, …
  • E. to Darwin, W. E. , (March, 1862 - DAR 219.1:49) Emma Darwin updates her son, William, …
  • is a great critic”, thought the article worth reprinting, Emma was less convinced. Letter

Darwin in letters, 1874: A turbulent year

Summary

The year 1874 was one of consolidation, reflection, and turmoil for Darwin. He spent the early months working on second editions of Coral reefs and Descent of man; the rest of the year was mostly devoted to further research on insectivorous plants. A…

Matches: 25 hits

  • 1874 was one of consolidation, reflection, and turmoil for Darwin. He spent the early months working
  • dispute over an anonymous review that attacked the work of Darwins son George dominated the second
  • and traveller Alexander von Humboldts 105th birthday, Darwin obliged with a reflection on his debt
  • … ). The death of a Cambridge friend, Albert Way, caused Darwins cousin, William Darwin Fox, to
  • from W. D. Fox, 8 May [1874] ).  Such reminiscences led Darwin to the self-assessment, ‘as for one
  • I feel very old & helpless The year started for Darwin with a weeks visit to
  • Andrew Clark, whom he had been consulting since August 1873. Darwin had originally thought that
  • …  ( letter to B. J. Sulivan, 6 January [1874] ). Darwin mentioned his poor health so frequently in
  • 1874 ). Séances, psychics, and sceptics Darwin excused himself for reasons of
  • by George Henry Lewes and Marian Evans (George Eliot), but Darwin excused himself, finding it too
  • the month, another Williams séance was held at the home of Darwins cousin Hensleigh Wedgwood. Those
  • imposter’ ( letter from T. H. Huxley, 27 January 1874 ). Darwin agreed that it wasall imposture’ …
  • stop word getting to America of thestrange newsthat Darwin had alloweda spirit séanceat his
  • the first three months of the year and, like many of Darwins enterprises in the 1870s, were family
  • 21, letter to Smith, Elder & Co., 17 December [1873] ). Darwin himself had some trouble in
  • and letter to Charles Lyell, [13 January 1874] ). Darwin blamed his illness for the
  • … . In his preface ( Coral reefs  2d ed., pp. vvii), Darwin reasserted the priority of his work. …
  • for the absence of coral-reefs in certain locations. Darwin countered with the facts that low
  • whole coastline of a large island. Dana also thought that Darwin had seen fringing reefs as proof of
  • satisfaction. Assisted in the wording by his wife, Emma, and daughter Henrietta, he finally wrote a
  • a comfortable cabin ( see letter from Leonard Darwin to Emma Darwin, [after 26 June -- 28 September
  • to become Darwins secretary. They rented Down Lodge and Emma Darwin wrote, ‘They have . . . made
  • the average in prettiness & snugness’ ( letter from Emma Darwin to J. B. Innes, 12 October
  • letter to Down School Board, [after 29 November 1873] ). Emma saw agreat blessingin the rumour
  • dead uncles position of vicar of Deptford ( letter from Emma Darwin to J. B. Innes, 12 October

Darwin in letters, 1863: Quarrels at home, honours abroad

Summary

At the start of 1863, Charles Darwin was actively working on the manuscript of The variation of animals and plants under domestication, anticipating with excitement the construction of a hothouse to accommodate his increasingly varied botanical experiments…

Matches: 25 hits

  • At the start of 1863, Charles Darwin was actively working on the manuscript of  The variation of
  • markedly, reflecting a decline in his already weak health. Darwin then began punctuating letters
  • am languid & bedeviled … & hate everybody’. Although Darwin did continue his botanical
  • letter-writing dwindled considerably. The correspondence and Darwins scientific work diminished
  • of the water-cure. The treatment was not effective and Darwin remained ill for the rest of the year. …
  • the correspondence from the year. These letters illustrate Darwins preoccupation with the
  • to mans place in nature  both had a direct bearing on Darwins species theory and on the problem
  • detailed anatomical similarities between humans and apes, Darwin was full of praise. He especially
  • in expressing any judgment on Species or origin of man’. Darwins concern about the popular
  • Lyells and Huxleys books. Three years earlier Darwin had predicted that Lyells forthcoming
  • first half of 1863 focused attention even more closely on Darwins arguments for species change. …
  • … ‘groan’ ( letter to Charles Lyell, 6 March [1863] ). Darwin reiterated in a later letter that it
  • of creation, and the origin of species particularly, worried Darwin; he told Hooker that he had once
  • letter to J. D. Hooker, 24[–5] February [1863] ). Darwin did not relish telling Lyell of his
  • … ( letter to Charles Lyell, 6 March [1863] ). Nevertheless, Darwins regret was profound that the
  • thebrutes’, but added that he would bring many towards Darwin who would have rebelled against
  • from Charles Lyell, 11 March 1863 ). The botanist Asa Gray, Darwins friend in the United States, …
  • off ( see letter from Asa Gray, 20 April 1863 ). In May, Darwin responded to Gray that Lyells and
  • or   Modification, ’. Faction fighting Darwin was not alone in feeling disaffected
  • had been unsuccessful ( see letter from E. A. Darwin to Emma Darwin, 11 November [1863] ). The
  • Gray, 4 August [1863] ). The results were published in his 1865 paperThree forms of  Lythrum
  • letter to Charles Lyell, 1213 March [1863] ). Emma was a steady help to Darwin, writing
  • shrubs ( see letter from W. D. Fox, 7 September [1863] ). Emma wrote back: ‘This has been a great
  • fared little better, and most letters were dictated to Emma. Darwin only managed one of his
  • letters from him in December were short, and dictated to Emma. By the end of the year, Emma admitted

Science: A Man’s World?

Summary

Discussion Questions|Letters Darwin's correspondence show that many nineteenth-century women participated in the world of science, be it as experimenters, observers, editors, critics, producers, or consumers. Despite this, much of the…

Matches: 13 hits

  • Discussion Questions | Letters Darwin's correspondence show that many nineteenth
  • Letters Darwins Notes On Marriage [April - July 1838] In these notes, …
  • of family, home and sociability. Letter 489 - Darwin to Wedgwood, E., [20 January 1839] …
  • theories, & accumulating facts in silence & solitude”. Darwin also comments that he has
  • Letter 3715 - Claparède, J. L. R. A. E. to Darwin, [6 September 1862] Claparède
  • are not those of her sex”. Letter 4038 - Darwin to Lyell, C., [12-13 March 1863] …
  • critic”. Letter 4377 - Haeckel, E. P. A. to Darwin, [2 January 1864] Haeckel
  • works”. Letter 4441 - Becker, L. E. to Darwin, [30 March 1864] Lydia Becker
  • to study nature. Letter 4940 - Cresy, E. to Darwin, E., [20 November 1865] …
  • of physiology at Bedford College for girls. Appealing to Emmasfeminine sympathies”, Cresy is keen
  • masculine nor pedantic”. Letter 6976 - Darwin to Blackwell, A. B., [8 November 1869] …
  • … , (1829). Letter 7329 - Murray, J. to Darwin, [28 September 1870] Written
  • them ears”. Letter 8055 - Hennell, S. S. to Darwin, [7 November 1871] Sarah

Interview with John Hedley Brooke

Summary

John Hedley Brooke is President of the Science and Religion Forum as well as the author of the influential Science and Religion: Some Historical Perspectives (Cambridge University Press, 1991). He has had a long career in the history of science and…

Matches: 27 hits

  • is [part of] a series of interviews that is hosted by the Darwin Correspondence Project about Darwin
  • of science ? and this is a question raised in a debate in Darwins day. Im not thinking of the more
  • takes place later in the 19th century, over spiritualism. Darwins close scientific colleague and
  • eventually engrossed, in spiritualism. He first writes to Darwin about this in 1869, and this is
  • these are better explained by the action of a higher power. Darwin is clearly shocked by this, and
  • scientifically. We tend to think always in terms of Darwin as the great scientist and Wallace as
  • of spirit agency guiding the process of evolution. Darwin himself, of course, resisted that
  • 4. Patterns in the response to Darwin Dr White: We know, partly from your own
  • specific religious traditions and their attitudes towards Darwin. I think its fairly obvious that
  • tradition ? you can look at the Presbyterian response to Darwin, for example, as David Livingstone
  • of ultra-conservatives who felt that science in the shape of Darwin was actually destructive of the
  • White: Id just like to follow up on that a bit more. Darwin had a number of clerical
  • one, Frederick Farrar was another ? and we know that Emma and Charles both read works of
  • is a willingness, as it were, to be fellow travellers with Darwin ? a willingness to see the world
  • ideas of human evolution in general ? and the sense in which Darwin, of course, reinforced them ? …
  • dilemma, and its exactly that kind of dilemma that Darwin finds engaging, enthralling, but also
  • or certain of them failed to come to terms with the Darwin mechanism ? correctly formulated ? we
  • liberal Anglicans didnt really understand exactly what Darwin had said or didnt know quite how
  • the first to the sixth edition of the Origin of Species, Darwin himself retreats somewhat over the
  • White: Another feature of some liberal Anglicanism in Darwins day was a particular emphasis on
  • toward a higher being, or a sense of ultimate purpose. Emma Darwins faith seems to be based largely
  • … ? were these addressed in theology? We know that they gave Emma considerable discomfort. …
  • the world is. Its also perfectly true, as you say, that Emma experienced considerable discomfort, …
  • at the heart, here, of some very sensitive issues between Emma and Charles himself. You ask, …
  • It was of major significance for Darwin himself, and for Emma, and its very striking that those who
  • And you refer to a letter from Joseph Hooker to Darwin in 1865 in which he notes the pain and
  • were family reasons: he didnt wish to inflict pain on Emma and other members of the family. I think

Darwin in letters, 1864: Failing health

Summary

On receiving a photograph from Charles Darwin, the American botanist Asa Gray wrote on 11 July 1864: ‘the venerable beard gives the look of your having suffered, and … of having grown older’.  Because of poor health, Because of poor health, Darwin…

Matches: 24 hits

  • On receiving a photograph from Charles Darwin, the American botanist Asa Gray wrote on 11 July
  • … … of having grown older’. This portrait, the first of Darwin with his now famous beard, had been
  • 52 hours without vomiting!! In the same month, Darwin began to consult William Jenner, …
  • prescribed a variety of antacids and purgatives, and limited Darwins fluid intake; this treatment
  • the dimorphic aquatic cut-grass  Leersia . In May, Darwin finished his paper on  Lythrum
  • he had set aside the previous summer. In October, Darwin let his friends know that on his
  • to the surgeon and naturalist Francis Trevelyan Buckland, Darwin described his symptoms in some
  • November and December were also marked by the award to Darwin of the Royal Societys Copley Medal; …
  • been unsuccessfully nominated the two previous years. As Darwin explained to his cousin William
  • it was conferred, brought a dramatic conclusion to the year. Darwin also wrote to Fox that he was
  • progressin Britain. Challenging convention Darwins concern about the acceptance of
  • …  vol. 11). In a letter of [27 January 1864] , Darwin wrote to Hooker: ‘The only approach to work
  • …  produce tendrils However, the queries that Darwin, describing himself asa broken-down
  • tendrils’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [8 February 1864] ). Darwins excitement about his
  • … ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 2 June [1864] ). When Darwin asked Oliver whether the tendrils of
  • for his teacherly tone, explaining that he had felt that Darwin had misunderstood some accepted
  • … ( letter from Daniel Oliver, [17 March 1864] ). Though Darwin replied with his typical humility
  • habits of climbing plants’ (‘Climbing plants’), which Darwin submitted to the Linnean Society in
  • was often the case, he was interested in transitional forms. Darwin came to think, for example, that
  • and tendril-bearers. At the end of his paper, Darwin used species from the genus  Lathyrus
  • household news, were sometimes written by Darwins wife, Emma, or by Henrietta. Darwins own replies
  • case of Dimorphismin  Menyanthes  ( letter from Emma and Charles Darwin to W. E. Darwin, [20
  • says when I read his discussion in the Elements [C. Lyell 1865] I shall recant for fifth time’ ( …
  • he saw few people outside the family and, according to Emma Darwins diary and his ownJournal’, …

Darwin in letters,1866: Survival of the fittest

Summary

The year 1866 began well for Charles Darwin, as his health, after several years of illness, was now considerably improved. In February, Darwin received a request from his publisher, John Murray, for a new edition of  Origin. Darwin got the fourth…

Matches: 22 hits

  • The year 1866 began well for Charles Darwin, as his health, after several years of illness, was now
  • and also a meeting with Herbert Spencer, who was visiting Darwins neighbour, Sir John Lubbock. In
  • all but the concluding chapter of the work was submitted by Darwin to his publisher in December. …
  • hypothesis of hereditary transmission. Debate about Darwins theory of transmutation
  • alleged evidence of a global ice age, while Asa Gray pressed Darwins American publisher for a
  • for the Advancement of Science. Fuller consideration of Darwins work was given by Hooker in an
  • frustrations were punctuated by family bereavement. Two of Darwins sisters died, Emily Catherine
  • from painful illness. Diet and exercise Among Darwins first letters in the new year
  • every day’ ( letter to H. B. Jones, 3 January [1866] ). Darwin had first consulted Jones in July
  • … ( letter from H. B. Jones, 10 February [1866] ). Darwin began riding the cob, Tommy, on 4
  • day which I enjoy much.’ The new exercise regime led to Darwins being teased by his neighbour, John
  • John Lubbock, 4 August 1866 ). More predictably, however, Darwin immediately converted his renewed
  • Since the publication of  Origin  in November 1859, Darwin had continued gathering and organising
  • a preliminary sketch of pangenesis to Thomas Henry Huxley in 1865 (see Correspondence vol. 13), and
  • Agassiz undertook an ambitious expedition to Brazil in 1865 and 1866