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Darwin in letters, 1878: Movement and sleep

Summary

In 1878, Darwin devoted most of his attention to the movements of plants. He investigated the growth pattern of roots and shoots, studying the function of specific organs in this process. Working closely with his son Francis, Darwin devised a series of…

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  • lessen injury to leaves from radiation In 1878, Darwin devoted most of his attention to
  • in this process. Working closely with his son Francis, Darwin devised a series of experiments to
  • plant laboratories in Europe. While Francis was away, Darwin delighted in his role as
  • from botanical research was provided by potatoes, as Darwin took up the cause of an Irish
  • would rid Ireland of famine. Several correspondents pressed Darwin for his views on religion, …
  • closed with remarkable news of a large legacy bequeathed to Darwin by a stranger as a reward for his
  • birthday ( letter to Ernst Haeckel, 12 February [1878] ), Darwin reflected that it wasmore
  • Expression ), and the final revision of Origin (1872), Darwin had turned almost exclusively to
  • Movement in plants In the spring of 1878, Darwin started to focus on the first shoots and
  • were enrolled as researchers, as were family members. Darwin asked his niece Sophy to observe
  • … ( letter to Sophy Wedgwood, 24 March [187880] ). While Darwin was studying the function of
  • on one side, then another, to produce movement in the stalk. Darwin compared adult and young leaves
  • after growth has ceased or nearly ceased.’ Finally, Darwin turned to plant motion below the
  • precision the lines of least resistance in the ground.’ Darwin would devote a whole chapter to the
  • that he missed sensitiveness of apex’ ( letter to Francis Darwin, [11 May 1878] ). Having
  • moisture, and various chemical and nutritive substances, Darwin next considered sound. He explained
  • instrument to various plants. To confirm the results, Darwin borrowed a siren from Tyndall, who had
  • ill-luck to them, are not sensitive to aerial vibrations’, Darwin complained. ‘I am ashamed at my
  • 8 August. ‘Alas Frank is off tomorrow to Wurzburg,’ Darwin wrote to Thiselton-Dyer on 2 June , ‘ …
  • Geological Record”’ ( letter from Edmund Mojsisovics von Mojsvár, 28 April 1878 ). ‘What a
  • of an infanthad been translated into Greek. Theodor von Heldreich wrote from Athens on 8
  • in Germany, as if they had been school-boys’ ( letter to Karl von Scherzer, 1 April 1878 ). …
  • opponent’ ( Correspondence vol. 24, letter to T. C. Eyton, 22 April 1876 ). ‘When I first read
  • business to raise different varieties on a large scale. In 1876, he had gone so far as to send
  • secretary, Robert Arthur Talbot Gascoyne-Cecil ( letter to R. A. T. Gascoyne-Cecil, 18 May 1878 ). …
  • to natural science & aids me in my work; a 4th son is in the R. Engineers & is getting on