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List of correspondents

Summary

Below is a list of Darwin's correspondents with the number of letters for each one. Click on a name to see the letters Darwin exchanged with that correspondent.    "A child of God" (1) Abberley,…

Matches: 11 hits

  • … Below is a list of Darwin's correspondents with the number of letters for each one. …
  • … James (1) Anderson, James (c) (3) …
  • … Vienna (1) Appleton, C. E. C. B. (2) …
  • … Athenæum (11) Atkin, J. R. (1) …
  • … Austin, A. D. (2) Austin, C. F. (1) …
  • … Baker, A. F. (1) Bakewell, R. H. (1) …
  • … K. S. (1) Barr, J. G. R. (1) …
  • … Edward (6) Bartlett, R. S. (1) …
  • … (1) Berliner Gesellschaft für Anthropologie, Ethnologie und Urgeschichte …
  • … Blackwell, T. E. (1) Blair, R. A. (7) …
  • … Dareste, Camille (9) Darwin family (1) …

Dramatisation script

Summary

Re: Design – Adaptation of the Correspondence of Charles Darwin, Asa Gray and others… by Craig Baxter – as performed 25 March 2007

Matches: 18 hits

  • Re: Designperformance version25 March 20071 Re: DesignAdaptation of the
  • as the creator of this dramatisation, and that of the Darwin Correspondence Project to be identified
  • correspondence or published writings of Asa Gray, Charles Darwin, Joseph Dalton Hooker, Jane Loring
  • predominantly read the words of the following: Actor 1Asa Gray Actor 2Charles
  • Agassiz, Adam Sedgwick, A Friend of John Stuart Mill, Emma Darwin, Horace Darwinand acts as a sort
  • the play unfolds and acting as a go-between between Gray and Darwin, and between the audience and
  • speech begins. THE VERY CITADEL OF NATURAL THEOLOGY: 1887-1888 In which are described
  • this, he sends out copies of his Review of the Life of Darwin. At this time in his life, Asa
  • friends in England, copies of hisReview of the Life of Darwin’… pencilling the address so that it
  • Joseph D Hooker GRAY:   3   Charles Darwinmade his home on the border of the little
  • are kept in check by a constitutional weakness. DARWIN: A plain but comfortable brick
  • of Natural Selectionwas drawn up in the year 1839, and copied and communicated to Messrs
  • a murder. DARWIN:   7   January 1844. My dear Hooker. I have beenengaged in a
  • to various ends. THE CONCURRENCE OF BOTANISTS: 1855 In which Darwin initiates a long
  • the letter. DARWIN8   April 25 th 1855. My dear [Dr Gray]. I hope you will
  • … ‘Arct. Asia’… GRAY:   9   May 22 nd 1855. Harvard University. My Dear Sir, I
  • paragraph, in which I quote and differ from you[r178   doctrine that each variation has been
  • ARTS AND SCIENCES, PROCEEDINGS XVII, 1882 4  C DARWIN TO JD HOOKER 10 MAY 1848

Darwin in letters, 1880: Sensitivity and worms

Summary

There are summaries of all Darwin's letters from the year 1880 on this website.  The full texts of the letters are not yet available online but are in volume 28 of the print edition of The correspondence of Charles Darwin, published by Cambridge…

Matches: 20 hits

  • There are summaries of all Darwin's letters from the year 1880 on this website.  The full texts
  • 28 of the print edition of The correspondence of Charles Darwin , published by Cambridge
  • to adapt to varying conditions. The implications of Darwins work for the boundary between animals
  • studies of animal instincts by George John Romanes drew upon Darwins early observations of infants, …
  • of evolution and creation. Many letters flowed between Darwin and his children, as he took delight
  • Financial support for science was a recurring issue, as Darwin tried to secure a Civil List pension
  • with Samuel Butler, prompted by the publication of Erasmus Darwin the previous year. …
  • Erasmuss life and other bits of family history. On 1 January , a distant cousin, Charles
  • character is of much value to me’ ( letter to C. H. Tindal, 5 January 1880 ). Darwin had employed
  • … & even the world’ ( letter from J. L. Chester, 3 March 1880 ). Darwins sons George and
  • Darwins Life . ‘In an endeavour to explain away y r . treatment of [William Alvey Darwin],’ …
  • letter from W. E. Darwin to Charles and Emma Darwin, 22 July 1880 ).                 Sales
  • he had written for the German journal Kosmos in February 1879, an issue produced in honour of
  • by anticipation the position I have taken as regards D r Erasmus Darwin in my book Evolution old
  • to the end’, added her husband Richard ( letter from R. B. Litchfield, 1 February 1880 ). Even the
  • shake their heads in the same dismal manner as you & M r . Murray did, when I told them my
  • in a book about beetles the impressive wordscaptured by C. Darwin”. … This seemed to me glory
  • … ‘but the subject has amused me’ ( letter to W. C. McIntosh, 18 June 1880 ). Members of the family
  • great doctrines …“Come of Age”‘ ( letter from W. C. Williamson to Emma Darwin, 2 September 1880 ). …
  • his voice as clearly as if he were present’ (letters to C. W. Fox, 29 March 1880 and 10 [April

Fake Darwin: myths and misconceptions

Summary

Many myths have persisted about Darwin's life and work. Here are a few of the more pervasive ones, with full debunking below...

Matches: 1 hits

  • … Many myths have persisted about Darwin's life and work. Here are a few of the more pervasive …

Dates of composition of Darwin's manuscript on species

Summary

Many of the dates of letters in 1856 and 1857 were based on or confirmed by reference to Darwin’s manuscript on species (DAR 8--15.1, inclusive; transcribed and published as Natural selection). This manuscript, begun in May 1856, was nearly completed by…

Matches: 7 hits

  • Many of the dates of letters in 1856 and 1857 were based on or confirmed by reference to Darwins
  • theory of transmutation ( letter to Charles Lyell, 18 [June 1858] ). Darwin recorded in his
  • in theJournaland the chapter headings as supplied by Darwin, followed by the reference of the
  • the chapters ( Natural selection ) are also given. Chapter 1 is not extant nor was it recorded in
  • title and references 1 [Not known] …
  • 4 26 January 1857 Variation under nature (DAR 9; …
  • chapter has been taken from a table of contents to which Darwin added the names of chapters as he

Darwin’s queries on expression

Summary

When Darwin resumed systematic research on emotions around 1866, he began to collect observations more widely and composed a list of queries on human expression. A number of handwritten copies were sent out in 1867 (see, for example, letter to Fritz Muller…

Matches: 17 hits

  • When Darwin resumed systematic research on emotions around 1866, he began to collect observations
  • expression. A number of handwritten copies were sent out in 1867 (see, for example, letter to
  • cultural and conventional, or instinctive and universal. Darwin used his existing correspondence
  • and with the mouth a little drawn back at the corners?” Darwins questionnaire was an extension of
  • was also carefully devised so as to prevent the feelings of Darwins remote observers from colouring
  • in Ceylon, wrote the botanist George Thwaites on 22 July 1868 , “all endeavour to drill their
  • Scottish botanist John Scott wrote from Calcutta, 4 May 1868 : “Shame isexpressed by an
  • and not the susceptibilities of a moral nature.” Darwin did not typically countenance such
  • the collection of information to its display in print. After Darwin received all of the replies to
  • exceptyesorno.” “The same state of mindDarwin would later assert in Expression of the
  • Barber, Mary E. [after Feb 1867] [Grahamstown, Cape
  • nodding vertically Blair, R.H. 11 July
  • Bowker, J.H. [10 Dec 1867] [Cape of Good Hope (South
  • Fuegians Brooke, C.A.J. 30 Nov 1870
  • Dyaks Brooke, C.A.J. 30 April 1871
  • Reade, Winwood W. [c.8 or 9 Apr 1870] Accra, West
  • in Hottentots Smyth, R. Brough 13 Aug 1868

Darwin in letters, 1879: Tracing roots

Summary

Darwin spent a considerable part of 1879 in the eighteenth century. His journey back in time started when he decided to publish a biographical account of his grandfather Erasmus Darwin to accompany a translation of an essay on Erasmus’s evolutionary ideas…

Matches: 16 hits

  • There are summaries of all Darwin's letters from the year 1879 on this website.  The full texts
  • 27 of the print edition of The correspondence of Charles Darwin , published by Cambridge
  • to publish a biographical account of his grandfather Erasmus Darwin to accompany a translation of an
  • the sensitivity of the tips. Despite this breakthrough, when Darwin first mentioned the book to his
  • … ( letter to W. T. Thiselton-Dyer, [after 26] July [1879] ). From July, Darwin had an additional
  • … ‘a dismal time’ ( letter to Henry Johnson, 24 September 1879 ). He may have been consoled to learn
  • all over like a baked pear’ ( enclosure in letter from R. W. Dixon, 20 December 1879 ). The year
  • or gone some other way round?’ At least the last letter of 1879 contained a warmer note and the
  • nice and good as could be’ ( letter from Karl Beger, [ c. 12 February 1879] ). The masters of
  • of the Admiralty described the unknown young man asA M r Darwin grandson of the well known
  • him on 9 June not toexpend much powder & shot on M r  Butler’, for he really was not worth
  • leaving Darwinmore perplexed than ever about life of D r . D’ ( letter to Francis Darwin, 12
  • the highest point, for hiswhy”—“what for” &c are incessant’, Darwin joked on 2 July (first
  • which is his profession thonot a profitable one; also D r  C[lark]’s opinion that he was so
  • greatly amused Darwin, who felt it wasvery acute of M r  Ruskin to know that I feel a deep & …
  • and preventCattle diseases, Potato diseases &c’, probably did not know that Darwin had already

Women’s scientific participation

Summary

Observers | Fieldwork | Experimentation | Editors and critics | Assistants Darwin’s correspondence helps bring to light a community of women who participated, often actively and routinely, in the nineteenth-century scientific community. Here is a…

Matches: 19 hits

  • … |  Editors and critics  |  Assistants Darwins correspondence helps bring to light a
  • community. Here is a selection of letters exchanged between Darwin and his workforce of women
  • Observers Women: Letter 1194 - Darwin to Whitby, M. A. T., [12 August
  • peculiarities in inheritance. Letter 3787 - Darwin, H. E. to Darwin, [29 October
  • in her garden. Letter 4523 - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, [6 June 1864] …
  • Letter 5745 - Barber, M. E. to Darwin, [after February 1867] Mary Barber responds to
  • Letter 6736 - Gray, A. & J. L to Darwin, [8 & 9 May 1869] Jane Loring Gray, …
  • Egypt. Letter 7223 - Darwin to Wedgwood, L. C., [8 June 1867 - 72] Darwin
  • Henrietta. Letter 7179 - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, [5 May 1870] …
  • the wallpaper. Letter 5756 - Langton, E. & C. to Wedgwood S. E., [after 9
  • Letter 1701 - Morris, M. H. to Prior, R. C. A., [17 June 1855] Margaretta Hare Morris
  • in Llandudno. Letter 4823  - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, H. E., [May 1865] …
  • Letter 8144 - Darwin to Wedgwood, L. C., [5 January 1872] Darwin asks his niece, …
  • Lychnis diurna. Letter 8168 - Ruck, A. R . to Darwin, H., [20 January 1872] …
  • lawn. Letter 8224 - Darwin to Ruck, A. R., [24 February 1872] Darwin
  • Letter 9606 - Harrison, L. C. to Darwin, [22 August 1874] Darwins niece, Lucy, …
  • Letter 1701  - Morris, M. H. to Prior, R. C. A., [17 June 1855] Margaretta Hare Morris
  • garden ”. Letter 6083  - Casparay, J. X. R. to Darwin, [2 April 1868] …
  • Letter 7858 - Darwin to Wa llace, A. R., [12 July 1871] Darwin tells Wallace that

Darwin in letters, 1876: In the midst of life

Summary

1876 was the year in which the Darwins became grandparents for the first time.  And tragically lost their daughter-in-law, Amy, who died just days after her son's birth.  All the letters from 1876 are now published in volume 24 of The Correspondence…

Matches: 18 hits

  • I cannot bear to think of the future The year 1876 started out sedately enough with
  • games. ‘I have won, hurrah, hurrah, 2795 games’, Darwin boasted; ‘my wifepoor creature, has won
  • regarding the ailments that were so much a feature of Darwin family life. But the calm was not to
  • four days later. ‘I cannot bear to think of the future’, Darwin confessed to William on 11
  • and his baby son Bernard now part of the household, and Darwin recasting his work on dimorphic and
  • in him fornew matter’ (letter to Asa Gray, 28 January 1876). The preparation of the second edition
  • of the second edition of Climbing plants ( letter from R. F. Cooke, 23 February 1876 ). When
  • observed to Carus. ( Letter to J. V. Carus, 24 April 1876. ) Darwin focused instead on the
  • … ‘advantages of crossing’ (letter to Asa Gray, 28 January 1876). Revising Orchids was less a
  • vol. 23, letter from Ernst von Hesse-Wartegg, 20 September 1875 ). He began to compile an account
  • with his new research in mind: ‘During this autumn of 1876 I shall publish on theEffects of Cross
  • … “nunc dimittis.”’ (‘Recollections’, pp. 41819). Darwin remained firm in his resolution to
  • however, continued to be raised in various ways. On 10 January, Charles OShaughnessy , an Irish
  • effected by his forthcoming pamphlet, Darwin confounded (C. OShaughnessy 1876), which, he
  • and who had succeeded in giving him pain ( letter to A. R. Wallace, 17 June 1876 ). Although
  • years experiments’ ( letter from G. J. Romanes, [ c . 19 March 1876] ). A less welcome reaction
  • because of along and terrible illness’ ( letter to C. S. Wedgwood, 20 April 1876 ). By the time
  • in harmony with yours’ ( letter from George Henslow, [ c. 7 December 1876] ). A more typical

Darwin in letters, 1868: Studying sex

Summary

The quantity of Darwin’s correspondence increased dramatically in 1868 due largely to his ever-widening research on human evolution and sexual selection.Darwin’s theory of sexual selection as applied to human descent led him to investigate aspects of the…

Matches: 21 hits

  • …   On 6 March 1868, Darwin wrote to the entomologist and accountant John Jenner Weir, ‘If
  • he ought to do what I am doing pester them with letters.’ Darwin was certainly true to his word. The
  • and sexual selection. In  Origin , pp. 8790, Darwin had briefly introduced the concept of
  • the mating process. In a letter to Alfred Russel Wallace in 1864, Darwin claimed that sexual
  • to the stridulation of crickets. At the same time, Darwin continued to collect material on
  • and his immediate circle of friends and relations. In July 1868 Darwin was still anticipating that
  • which was devoted to sexual selection in the animal kingdom. Darwin described his thirst for
  • a little and not too much’ ( letter to Albert Günther, 15 May [1868] ). My book is
  • in January 1868. A final delay caused by the indexing gave Darwin much vexation. ‘My book is
  • Murray to intervene, complaining on 9 January , ‘M r . Dallasdelayis intolerableI am
  • it was by Gray himself, but Darwin corrected him: ‘D r  Gray would strike me in the face, but not
  • … . It is a disgrace to the paper’ ( letter from A. R. Wallace, 24 February [1868] ). The review was
  • April 1868 . The letter was addressed tothe Rev d  C. Darwin M.d’; Binstead evidently assumed
  • I did not see this, or rather I saw it only obs[c]urely, & have kept only a few references.’ …
  • as life he wd find the odour sexual!’ ( letter to A . R. Wallace, 16 September [1868] ). Francis
  • south of France to Sarah Elizabeth Wedgwood on 9 Novembe r, describing sphinx moths that were
  • question of theOrigin of Species”’ ( letter from A. R. Wallace, 4 October 1868 ). …
  • hands of the enemies of Nat. Selection’ ( letter from A. R. Wallace, 8 [April] 1868 ). …
  • mission stations in Victoria, Australia ( letter from R. B. Smyth, 13 August 1868 ); lengthy
  • of her two-month old daughter Katherine ( letter from C. M. Hawkshaw to Emma Darwin, 9 February
  • rest mostly on faith, and on accumulation of adaptations, &c) … Of course I understand your

Darwin’s reading notebooks

Summary

In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he wished to read in Notebook C (Notebooks, pp. 319–28). In 1839, these lists were copied and continued in separate notebooks. The first of these reading notebooks (DAR 119…

Matches: 20 hits

  • In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he wished to
  • used these notebooks extensively in dating and annotating Darwins letters; the full transcript
  • A previous transcript of the reading notebooks (Vorzimmer 1977) included only theBooks Read’ …
  • … *128). For clarity, the transcript does not record Darwins alterations. The spelling and
  • book had been consulted. Those cases where it appears that Darwin made a genuine deletion have been
  • a few instances, primarily in theBooks Readsections, Darwin recorded that a work had been
  • of the books listed in the other two notebooks. Sometimes Darwin recorded that an abstract of the
  • own. Soon after beginning his first reading notebook, Darwin began to separate the scientific
  • the second reading notebook. Readers primarily interested in Darwins scientific reading, therefore, …
  • to be Read [DAR *119: Inside Front Cover] C. Darwin June 1 st . 1838
  • … [DAR *119: 2v.] Whites regular gradation in man [C. White 1799] Lindleys
  • 8 vo  p 181 [Latreille 1819]. see p. 17 Note Book C. for reference to authors about E. Indian
  • in brutes Blackwood June 1838 [J. F. Ferrie 1838]. H. C. Watson on Geog. distrib: of Brit: …
  • Wiegman has pub. German pamphlet on crossing oats &c [Wiegmann 1828] Horticultural
  • in Library of Hort. Soc. [DAR *119:5v.] M c .Neil 16  has written good article
  • … [Fellows 1839] Catherine 48 Life of Collins R.A. [Collins 1848] Phases of Faith
  • 1848Memoirs of the life of William   Collins, Esq., R.A.  2 vols. London.  *119: 23; 119: …
  • by Richard Owen.  Vol. 4 of  The works of John Hunter, F.R.S. with notes . Edited by James F. …
  • Robert. 1843Memoirs of the life of John   Constable, R.A., composed chiefly of his letters. …
  • Peacock, George. 1855Life of Thomas Young, M.D., F.R.S.  London.  *128: 172; 128: 21

Darwin in letters, 1867: A civilised dispute

Summary

Charles Darwin’s major achievement in 1867 was the completion of his large work, The variation of animals and plants under domestication (Variation). The importance of Darwin’s network of correspondents becomes vividly apparent in his work on expression in…

Matches: 20 hits

  • …   Charles Darwins major achievement in 1867 was the completion of his large workThe
  • had been delivered to the publisher in the final week of 1866. It would take all of 1867 to correct
  • selection in relation to sex  ( Descent ), published in 1871, and the chapter on expression into
  • in man and animals  ( Expression ), published in 1872. Although Darwin had been collecting
  • A global reputation The importance of Darwins network of correspondents becomes vividly
  • Variation  would be based on proof-sheets received as Darwin corrected them. Closer to home, two
  • Charles Fleeming Jenkin, challenged different aspects of Darwins theory of transmutation as
  • orchids are fertilised by insects  ( Orchids ). While Darwin privately gave detailed opinions of
  • capable hands of Alfred Russel Wallace. At the same time, Darwin was persuaded by some German
  • were becoming counterproductive. Throughout the year, Darwin continued to discuss now
  • transmutation theory. Three important new correspondents in 1867 were Hermann Müller and Anton Dohrn
  • the New Years greeting, ‘may you be eupeptic through 1867 & your friends & the world in
  • part of his long-delayedbig book’, started in January 1860, and advertised in the press since 1865
  • see your second volume onThe Struggle for Existence &c.” for I doubt if we have a sufficiency
  • … “supplemental remarks on expression”’ ( letter to A. R. Wallace, [1217] March [1867] ). Darwins
  • aviary to see whether this was the case ( letter from A. R. Wallace, 24 February [1867] ). He also
  • level. In his response to Wallace ( letter to A. R. Wallace, 26 February [1867] ), Darwin defended
  • to the work I shall find it much better done by you than I c d  have succeeded in doing’ ( letter
  • I have not a word to say against it but such a view c d  hardly come into a scientific book’ ( …
  • Wallace published a long article, ‘Creation by law’ (A. R. Wallace 1867c), which responded to Jenkin

Suggested reading

Summary

  Contemporary writing Anon., The English matron: A practical manual for young wives, (London, 1846). Anon., The English gentlewoman: A practical manual for young ladies on their entrance to society, (Third edition, London, 1846). Becker, L. E.…

Matches: 10 hits

  • … :  A practical manual for young wives , (London, 1846). Anon.,  T he English
  • their entrance to society ,  (Third edition, London, 1846). Becker, L. E. B.,  …
  • … (ed.),  Vacation Tourists and Notes of Travel , (London, 1864), pp. 357 - 371. Smiles, S.,  …
  • domestic influence and social obligations ,  (London, 1843). Somerville, M.,  On
  • of men of the day: Dr Garrett Anderson , (London, 1873), p. 30.   Modern
  • scientific thinking  (London, 2006). Browne, JDarwins Origin of species : A b
  • … , pp. 84117Davidoff, L. & Hall, C.,  Family fortunes: Men and women of the
  • 1820 - 1885 , (Georgia, 2007). Harvey, J., ‘‘Darwins angels’: The women correspondents of
  • Review  19:2 (2009), pp. 197 - 210. Hubbard, R.,  The politics of womens biology , …
  • nature for new audiences  (Chicago, 2007). Numbers, R. L. & Stenhouse, J., (eds.),  …

Darwin in letters, 1874: A turbulent year

Summary

The year 1874 was one of consolidation, reflection, and turmoil for Darwin. He spent the early months working on second editions of Coral reefs and Descent of man; the rest of the year was mostly devoted to further research on insectivorous plants. A…

Matches: 17 hits

  • The year 1874 was one of consolidation, reflection, and turmoil for Darwin. He spent the early
  • dispute over an anonymous review that attacked the work of Darwins son George dominated the second
  • been the naturalist and traveller Alexander von Humboldts 105th birthday, Darwin obliged with a
  • during prolonged intervals’ ( letter to D. T. Gardner, [ c . 27 August 1874] ). The death of a
  • and collecting beetles ( letter from W. D. Fox, 8 May [1874] ).  Such reminiscences led Darwin to
  • backwards much more than forwards’ ( letter to W. D. Fox, 11 May [1874] ). I feel
  • Andrew Clark, whom he had been consulting since August 1873. Darwin had originally thought that
  • old & helpless’  ( letter to B. J. Sulivan, 6 January [1874] ). Darwin mentioned his poor
  • on the matter ( letter from Ernst Haeckel, 26 October 1874 ). Séances, psychics, and
  • confided to Joseph Dalton Hooker ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 18 January [1874] ). Later in
  • Descent  was published in November 1874 ( letter from R. F. Cooke, 12 November 1874 ). Though
  • on subsequent print runs would be very good ( letter from R. F. Cooke, 12 November 1874 ). …
  • in a few hours dissolve the hardest cartilage, bone & meat &c. &c.’ ( letter to W. D. …
  • whether at theclose of the putrefaction of flesh, skin &c, any substance is produced before
  • details of an Australian variety of sundew ( letter from T. C. Copland, 23 June 1874 ). …
  • Sharpe for promotion at the British Museum ( letter to R. B. Sharpe, 24 November [1874] ).  He
  • head that M r  Spencers terms of equilibration &c always bother me & make everything less

Race, Civilization, and Progress

Summary

Darwin's first reflections on human progress were prompted by his experiences in the slave-owning colony of Brazil, and by his encounters with the Yahgan peoples of Tierra del Fuego. Harsh conditions, privation, poor climate, bondage and servitude,…

Matches: 23 hits

  • Letters | Selected Readings Darwin's first reflections on human progress were
  • human progress or cause degeneration. In the "Fuegians", Darwin thought he had witnessed
  • several years earlier as part of a missionary enterprise. Darwin was struck by the progress that had
  • complete & voluntary Europeans" ( Beagle Diary , p. 143 ). But he was also shocked
  • been returned to their native land. After the voyage, Darwin began to question the
  • After the publication of Origin of Species , many of Darwin's supporters continued to
  • or extermination of other peoples and cultures. When Darwin wrote about the human races and
  • on human and animal behavior accumulated over three decades. Darwin argued forcefully for the unity
  • death" when evolution is generally accepted ( Descent 1: 235 ). He also employed the
  • important element in the success of nations" ( Descent 1: 239 ). The implications of
  • and beyond. Letters Darwins first observations of the peoples
  • Cambridge, John Stevens Henslow. Letter 204 : Darwin to Henslow, J. S., 11 April 1833
  • Charles wrote to his sister, Emily Catherine Darwin, about witnessing slavery in the Portuguese
  • effect in the following year. Letter 206 : Darwin to Darwin, E. C., 22 May [– 14 July] …
  • descent. Letter 4933 : Farrar, F. W. to Darwin, 6 November 1865 "so
  • this a very strong argument for the Polygenist?" Darwin asked the English settler
  • of replies from the South African native, Christian Gaika. Darwin was impressed by Gaika's
  • of civilization of the natives. Letter 5617 , Darwin to Weale, J. P. M., 27 August
  • civilization" Letter 5722 , Weale, J. P. M. to Darwin, [10 December 1867] …
  • … , 6 th ed, p. 98). Letter 2503 : Darwin, C. R. to Lyell, C., 11 October [1859] …
  • William Graham. Letter 2503 : Darwin, C. R. to Lyell, C., 11 October [1859] I
  • in rank." Letter 4510 : Darwin to Wallace, A. R., 28 [May 1864] "Now
  • … . New York: The Free Press, 1968. Robert J. C. Young, Colonial Desire: Hybridity in Theory, …

Darwin in letters, 1878: Movement and sleep

Summary

In 1878, Darwin devoted most of his attention to the movements of plants. He investigated the growth pattern of roots and shoots, studying the function of specific organs in this process. Working closely with his son Francis, Darwin devised a series of…

Matches: 13 hits

  • … is to lessen injury to leaves from radiation In 1878, Darwin devoted most of his …
  • … in this process. Working closely with his son Francis, Darwin devised a series of experiments to …
  • … plant laboratories in Europe. While Francis was away, Darwin delighted in his role as …
  • … from botanical research was provided by potatoes, as Darwin took up the cause of an Irish …
  • … would rid Ireland of famine. Several correspondents pressed Darwin for his views on religion, …
  • … closed with remarkable news of a large legacy bequeathed to Darwin by a stranger as a reward for his …
  • … and Expression ), and the final revision of Origin (1872), Darwin had turned almost …
  • … plants.’ Movement in plants In the spring of 1878, Darwin started to focus on the …
  • … were enrolled as researchers, as were family members. Darwin asked his niece Sophy to observe …
  • … come up arched’ ( letter to Sophy Wedgwood, 24 March [1878–80] ). While Darwin was studying the …
  • … on one side, then another, to produce movement in the stalk. Darwin compared adult and young leaves …
  • … after growth has ceased or nearly ceased.’ Finally, Darwin turned to plant motion below the …
  • … precision the lines of least resistance in the ground.’ Darwin would devote a whole chapter to the …

Women as a scientific audience

Summary

Target audience? | Female readership | Reading Variation Darwin's letters, in particular those exchanged with his editors and publisher, reveal a lot about his intended audience. Regardless of whether or not women were deliberately targeted as a…

Matches: 9 hits

  • … Female readership | Reading Variation Darwin's letters, in particular those …
  • … a broad variety of women had access to, and engaged with, Darwin's published works. A set of …
  • … women a target audience? Letter 2447 - Darwin to Murray, J., [5 April 1859] …
  • … that his views are original and will appeal to the public. Darwin asks Murray to forward the …
  • … and criticisms of style. Letter 2461 - Darwin to Hooker, J. D., [11 May 1859] …
  • … Letter 7124 - Darwin to Darwin, H. E., [8 February 1870] Darwin seeks Henrietta’s …
  • … Letter 7331 - Darwin to Murray, J., [29 September 1870] Darwin asks Murray to …
  • … Letter 8335 - Reade, W. W. to Darwin, [16 May 1872] Reade tells Darwin of his …
  • … Letter 8341 - Reade, W. W. to Darwin, [20 May 1872] Reade shares with Darwin his …

Referencing women’s work

Summary

Darwin's correspondence shows that women made significant contributions to Darwin's work, but whether and how they were acknowledged in print involved complex considerations of social standing, professional standing, and personal preference.…

Matches: 13 hits

  • Darwin's correspondence shows that women made significant contributions to Darwin's work, …
  • standing, and personal preferenceGeorge Romanes in his 1882 publication Animal intelligence
  • set of selected letters is followed by letters relating to Darwin's 1881 publication
  • throughout Variation . Letter 2395 - Darwin to Holland, Miss, [April 1860] …
  • anonymised and masculinised. Letter 3316 - Darwin to Nevill, D. F., [12 November
  • Nevill is referenced by name for herkindnessin Darwins Fertilisation of Orchids . …
  • science critic. Letter 4370 - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, [April - May 1865] …
  • Surrey”. Letter 4794 - Darwin to Lyell, C., [25 March 1865] Darwin asks
  • to state that the information wasreceived through Sir C. Lyellor received fromMiss. B”. …
  • Letter 7223 - Darwin to Wedgwood, L. C., [9 June 1867 - 72] Darwin asks his niece to
  • at him. Letter 7345 - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, [15 June 1872] Darwins
  • near his house. Letter 8168 - Ruck, A. R. to Darwin, H., [20 January 1872] …
  • worm castings . Letter 7345 - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, [15 June 1872] …

Henrietta Darwin's diary

Summary

Darwin's daughter Henrietta kept a diary for a few momentous weeks in 1871. This was the year in which Descent of Man, the most controversial of her father's books after Origin itself, appeared, a book which she had helped him write. The small…

Matches: 12 hits

  • Charles Darwins daughter Henrietta wrote the following journal entries in March and July 1871 in a
  • excised within it, presumably by Henrietta herself. Darwins letters in 1870 and 1871 ( …
  • scepticism; many of her arguments are reminiscent of Darwins own discussion of religious belief in
  • missions due to take place between 26 February and 5 March 1871 in four towns within the deanery of
  • Origin at the Oxford meeting of the British Association in 1860. In the second entry, …
  • of the theory of natural selection. Snow occasionally sent Darwin information relating to his
  • of emotion (see letters from F. J. Wedgwood to H. E. and C. R. Darwin, [186772],  letter   nos. …
  • one of  Descent  (see letter from Charles and Emma Darwin to F. J. Wedgwood, [March 1871?], and
  • period of their courtship. We are grateful to William Darwin for permission to publish the
  • amongst whom of course was Lena had any knowledge of it. M r . W. spoke or preached as u like to
  • Father who w d  be waiting for herwhen down came M r . W. on his knees between them & said, …
  • worship of humanitythis I hope is