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Darwin in letters, 1876: In the midst of life

Summary

1876 was the year in which the Darwins became grandparents for the first time.  And tragically lost their daughter-in-law, Amy, who died just days after her son's birth.  All the letters from 1876 are now published in volume 24 of The Correspondence…

Matches: 19 hits

  • I cannot bear to think of the future The year 1876 started out sedately enough with
  • games. ‘I have won, hurrah, hurrah, 2795 games’, Darwin boasted; ‘my wifepoor creature, has won
  • regarding the ailments that were so much a feature of Darwin family life. But the calm was not to
  • four days later. ‘I cannot bear to think of the future’, Darwin confessed to William on 11
  • in him fornew matter’ (letter to Asa Gray, 28 January 1876). The preparation of the second edition
  • of the second edition of Climbing plants ( letter from R. F. Cooke, 23 February 1876 ). When
  • observed to Carus. ( Letter to J. V. Carus, 24 April 1876. ) Darwin focused instead on the
  • … ‘advantages of crossing’ (letter to Asa Gray, 28 January 1876). Revising Orchids was less a
  • with his new research in mind: ‘During this autumn of 1876 I shall publish on theEffects of Cross
  • effected by his forthcoming pamphlet, Darwin confounded (C. OShaughnessy 1876), which, he
  • and who had succeeded in giving him pain ( letter to A. R. Wallace, 17 June 1876 ). Although
  • had been founded in March 1876 by the London physiologist John Scott Burdon Sanderson to discuss how
  • weretoo silly to deserve an answer’ ( letter from S. B. Herrick, 12 February 1876 ). Others
  • years experiments’ ( letter from G. J. Romanes, [ c . 19 March 1876] ). A less welcome reaction
  • Darwin rejoiced to hear that the Cambridge astronomer John Couch Adams not only approved of Georges
  • because of along and terrible illness’ ( letter to C. S. Wedgwood, 20 April 1876 ). By the time
  • at the pre-publication sale dinner held by his publisher, John Murray ( letter to John Murray, 15
  • … ). In England, the clergyman botanist George Henslow, son of John Stevens Henslow, Darwins
  • in harmony with yours’ ( letter from George Henslow, [ c. 7 December 1876] ). A more typical

Women as a scientific audience

Summary

Target audience? | Female readership | Reading Variation Darwin's letters, in particular those exchanged with his editors and publisher, reveal a lot about his intended audience. Regardless of whether or not women were deliberately targeted as a…

Matches: 8 hits

  • … Female readership | Reading Variation Darwin's letters, in particular those …
  • … a broad variety of women had access to, and engaged with, Darwin's published works. A set of …
  • … women a target audience? Letter 2447 - Darwin to Murray, J., [5 April 1859] …
  • … Letter 6976 - Darwin to Blackwell, A. L. B., [8 November, 1869] Darwin writes to feminist …
  • … to him only as a scientific author, Darwin assumes that 'A. B. Blackwell' is a man. …
  • … questionnaire. Letter 10390 - Herrick, S. M. B. to Darwin, [12 February 1876] …
  • … Letter 10415 - Darwin to Herrick, S. M. B., [6 March 1876] Darwin responds to a …
  • … Letter 10508 - Treat, M. to Darwin, [15 May 1876] Mary Treat thanks Darwin for …

Darwin in letters, 1868: Studying sex

Summary

The quantity of Darwin’s correspondence increased dramatically in 1868 due largely to his ever-widening research on human evolution and sexual selection.Darwin’s theory of sexual selection as applied to human descent led him to investigate aspects of the…

Matches: 20 hits

  • …   On 6 March 1868, Darwin wrote to the entomologist and accountant John Jenner Weir, ‘If any
  • and sexual selection. In  Origin , pp. 8790, Darwin had briefly introduced the concept of
  • process. In a letter to Alfred Russel Wallace in 1864, Darwin claimed that sexual selection wasthe
  • to the stridulation of crickets. At the same time, Darwin continued to collect material on
  • his immediate circle of friends and relations. In July 1868 Darwin was still anticipating that his
  • domestication . Having been advertised by the publisher John Murray as early as 1865, the two
  • increased the amount of work substantially. Darwin asked Murray to intervene, complaining on 9
  • a great loss to the Book’. But Darwins angry letter to Murray crossed one from Dallas to himself, …
  • a cheque to Dallas for £55  s ., and recommended to Murray that Dallas receive additional payment. …
  • of the book were sold within a month of its release, and Murray made immediate arrangements for a
  • profound contempt of me. I feel convinced it is by Owen’. John Edward Gray, a colleague of Richard
  • … . It is a disgrace to the paper’ ( letter from A. R. Wallace, 24 February [1868] ). The review was
  • April 1868 . The letter was addressed tothe Rev d  C. Darwin M.d’; Binstead evidently assumed
  • I did not see this, or rather I saw it only obs[c]urely, & have kept only a few references.’ …
  • as life he wd find the odour sexual!’ ( letter to A . R. Wallace, 16 September [1868] ). Francis
  • south of France to Sarah Elizabeth Wedgwood on 9 Novembe r, describing sphinx moths that were
  • mission stations in Victoria, Australia ( letter from R. B. Smyth, 13 August 1868 ); lengthy
  • of her two-month old daughter Katherine ( letter from C. M. Hawkshaw to Emma Darwin, 9 February
  • rest mostly on faith, and on accumulation of adaptations, &c) … Of course I understand your
  • to be acomplete & premeditated swindler’ ( letter to J. B. Innes, 1 December 1868 ), his

Women’s scientific participation

Summary

Observers | Fieldwork | Experimentation | Editors and critics | Assistants Darwin’s correspondence helps bring to light a community of women who participated, often actively and routinely, in the nineteenth-century scientific community. Here is a…

Matches: 26 hits

  • … |  Editors and critics  |  Assistants Darwins correspondence helps bring to light a
  • community. Here is a selection of letters exchanged between Darwin and his workforce of women
  • Women: Letter 1194 - Darwin to Whitby, M. A. T., [12 August 1849] Darwin
  • peculiarities in inheritance. Letter 3787 - Darwin, H. E. to Darwin, [29 October
  • in her garden. Letter 4523 - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, [6 June 1864] …
  • Egypt. Letter 7223 - Darwin to Wedgwood, L. C., [8 June 1867 - 72] Darwin
  • Henrietta. Letter 7179 - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, [5 May 1870] …
  • to Darwin, [1873] Ellen Lubbock, wife of naturalist John Lubbock, responds to Darwins
  • the wallpaper. Letter 5756 - Langton, E. & C. to Wedgwood S. E., [after 9
  • 6815 - Scott, J. to Darwin, [2 July 1869] John Scott responds to Darwins queries
  • Letter 1701 - Morris, M. H. to Prior, R. C. A., [17 June 1855] Margaretta Hare Morris
  • in Llandudno. Letter 4823  - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, H. E., [May 1865] …
  • Lychnis diurna. Letter 8168 - Ruck, A. R . to Darwin, H., [20 January 1872] …
  • lawn. Letter 8224 - Darwin to Ruck, A. R., [24 February 1872] Darwin
  • Letter 10439 - Treat, M. to Darwin, [3 April 1876] Mary Treat describes a field trip
  • Letter 1701  - Morris, M. H. to Prior, R. C. A., [17 June 1855] Margaretta Hare Morris
  • of Wilmington. Letter 10390 - Herrick, S. M. B . to Darwin, [12 February 1876] …
  • of his garden. Letter 4233  - Tegetmeier, W. B. to Darwin, [29 June - 7 July 1863] …
  • …  - Weir, J. J. to Darwin, [24 March 1868] John Weir describes experiments he is undertaking
  • garden ”. Letter 6083  - Casparay, J. X. R. to Darwin, [2 April 1868] …
  • Letter 10517  - Darwin to Francis, F., [29 May 1876] Darwin gives his son, Francis, …
  • challenging ideas. Letter 2447 - Darwin to Murray, J., [5 April 1859] …
  • Letter 7858 - Darwin to Wa llace, A. R., [12 July 1871] Darwin tells Wallace that
  • editorial criticism of a paper written by English naturalist John Lubbock. In addition to offering
  • service. Letter 3298  - Darwin to Clarke, W. B., [25 October 1861] Darwin asks
  • Letter 10517  - Darwin t o Francis, F., [29 May 1876] Darwin gives his son, Francis

Darwin's in letters, 1873: Animal or vegetable?

Summary

Having laboured for nearly five years on human evolution, sexual selection, and the expression of emotions, Darwin was able to devote 1873 almost exclusively to his beloved plants. He resumed work on the digestive powers of sundews and Venus fly traps, and…

Matches: 27 hits

  • evolution, sexual selection, and the expression of emotions, Darwin was able to devote 1873 almost
  • plants  (1875) and  Cross and self fertilisation  (1876). Darwins son Francis became
  • career to become his fathers scientific secretary. Darwin had always relied on assistance from
  • Franciss decision. A large portion of the letters Darwin received in 1873 were in response
  • the previous year. As was typical, readers wrote to Darwin personally to offer suggestions, …
  • some of which were incorporated in a later edition. Darwin also contributed to discussions in the
  • Francis Galtons work on inherited talent, which prompted Darwin to reflect on the traits and
  • Station at Naples. Plants that eat and feel? Darwin had resumed experiments on the
  • 12 January [1873] ).  Drosera  was the main focus of Darwins study of insectivorous plants, a
  • and alkaloids, and even electrical stimulation. On sending Darwin a specimen of the carnivorous  …
  • … ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 12 January 1873 ). Darwin found that the glandular hairs on the
  • Thomas Lauder Brunton, a specialist in pharmacology, and John Scott Burdon Sanderson, a professor at
  • … “for Heaven knows when it will be ready” ( letter to John Murray, 4 May [1873] ). Keeping
  • of the great principle of inheritance!” ( letter to F. S. B. F. de Chaumont, 3 February [1873] ). …
  • with leading physiologists such as David Ferrier and John Hughlings Jackson. Darwin declined to
  • Instinct  In February, Darwin received a letter from John Traherne Moggridge on the nature of
  • without instruction or previously acquired knowledge” (A. R. Wallace 1870, p. 204). Moggridge
  • fund was first suggested in early April by Katharine Murray Lyell in conversation with Emma Darwin, …
  • A group of Huxleys close friends, including Hooker, John Lubbock, Herbert Spencer, John Tyndall, …
  • edition was called for. There were commercial advantages for Murray in bringing out a substantially
  • believes whether or not they are sound” ( letter to A. R. Wallace, 17 November 1873 ). But no
  • your own power & usefulness”, citing the examples of John Stuart Mill and Charles Lyell, who
  • from Ernst Meitzen, 17 January 1873 ). A poor-law officer, John Farr, wrote: “Faith like Species, …
  • more permanent than species are permanent” ( letter from John Farr, 7 July 1873 ). Further
  • unorthodoxy, troubling and potentially undermining (J. R. Moore 1985, pp. 4712). A courted
  • closer to home, when he was graced by an invitation from John Jenner Weir to act as a patron of the
  • a personification of Natural Filosofy” ( letter from J. C. Costerus and N. D. Doedes, 18 March 1873

Darwin’s reading notebooks

Summary

In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he wished to read in Notebook C (Notebooks, pp. 319–28). In 1839, these lists were copied and continued in separate notebooks. The first of these reading notebooks (DAR 119…

Matches: 24 hits

  • In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he wished to
  • … (DAR 119) opens with five pages of text copied from Notebook C and carries on through 1851; the
  • used these notebooks extensively in dating and annotating Darwins letters; the full transcript
  • … *128). For clarity, the transcript does not record Darwins alterations. The spelling and
  • book had been consulted. Those cases where it appears that Darwin made a genuine deletion have been
  • the transcript) and the non-scientific on the right (labelledb’). He continued this separation of
  • of working out his ideas on the transmutation of species. In 1876, long after this period of Darwin
  • to be Read [DAR *119: Inside Front Cover] C. Darwin June 1 st . 1838
  • … [DAR *119: 2v.] Whites regular gradation in man [C. White 1799] Lindleys
  • 8 vo  p 181 [Latreille 1819]. see p. 17 Note Book C. for reference to authors about E. Indian
  • Archipelago [Crawfurd 1820] Raffeles d[itt]o [T. S. B. Raffles 1817] Buffon Suites
  • 183941]— in Geograph Soc Siebolds Japan [P. F. B. von Siebold 183350]— d[itt]o Kalm
  • Domestic Improvement ] Loudons. Journal of Nat Hist Z & B [ Magazine of Natural History
  • Nemesis to China [Bernard 1844]. The Emigrant, Head [F. B. Head 1846] St. Johns
  • 1766] Count Dandalo on silk worm Eng. Translat 1825Murray [Dandolo 1825] /good/ M rs
  • B.M. 6. 6. Black Edin. Longman [Ramsay 1848] St. Johns Nat. Hist. of Sutherlanshire, Murray
  • … [Fellows 1839] Catherine 48 Life of Collins R.A. [Collins 1848] Phases of Faith
  • Liebigs Lectures on Chemistry [Liebig 1851]. Sir John Davies. China during the War and Peace
  • … ] to end of Vol: XVIII & Part I. of V. 19 (1843) 25. Murray Domestic Poultry.— Domestic
  • many vols. I have read.— [DAR *128: 149] Murray Geograph. Distrib. Price William
  • 1848Memoirs of the life of William   Collins, Esq., R.A.  2 vols. London.  *119: 23; 119: …
  • by Richard Owen.  Vol. 4 of  The works of John Hunter, F.R.S. with notes . Edited by James F. …
  • Robert. 1843Memoirs of the life of John   Constable, R.A., composed chiefly of his letters. …
  • Peacock, George. 1855Life of Thomas Young, M.D., F.R.S.  London.  *128: 172; 128: 21