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Darwin in letters, 1872: Job done?

Summary

'My career’, Darwin wrote towards the end of 1872, 'is so nearly closed. . .  What little more I can do, shall be chiefly new work’, and the tenor of his correspondence throughout the year is one of wistful reminiscence, coupled with a keen eye…

Matches: 22 hits

  • … ‘My career’, Darwin wrote towards the end of 1872, ‘is so nearly closed. . .  What little more I can
  • as evolution’ ( letter to ARWallace,  27 July [1872] ). By the end of the year Darwin
  • Darwins best efforts, set the final price at 7 s.  6 d.  ( letter from RFCooke, 12
  • as I can make it’, he wrote to the translator ( letter to JJMoulinié, 23 September 1872 ). He
  • of the year ( letter from C.-FReinwald, 23 November 1872 ). To persuade his US publisher, …
  • anatomist St George Jackson Mivart ( letter to St GJMivart,  11 January [1872] ). A
  • beautiful’ ( letter from ARWallace, 3 March 1872 ). I consider that you have
  • am made to appear’, complained Darwin ( letter to St GJMivart, 5 January 1872 ). Piqued, …
  • … `fundamental intellectual errors’ ( letter from St GJMivart, 6 January 1872 ). Darwin
  • to think he felt friendly towards me’ ( letter to St GJMivart, 8 January [1872] ).  Despite
  • if only `in another world’ ( letter from St GJMivart,  10 January 1872 ).  Darwin, determined
  • …  but asked Mivart not to acknowledge it ( letter to St GJMivart, 11 January [1872] ). 'I
  • selection is somewhat under a cloud’, he wrote to JETaylor on 13 January , and he complained
  • rather than offended by `that clever book’ ( letter to JMHerbert, 21 November 1872 ) and
  • dispute involving his close friend Joseph Dalton Hooker came to a headHooker, director of the
  • system in the glasshouses had escalated to the point where Hooker applied over Ayrtons head direct
  • your enemies be cursed, is my pious frame of mind Hookers cause was taken up by his
  • the independence of science from bureaucratic interference. Hooker had kept Darwin well informed: …
  • was Darwins wholeheartedly partisan reply ( letter to JDHooker, 14 May 1872 ). On 13 June, a
  • to make one turn into an old honest Tory’ ( letter to JDHooker, 12 July [1872] ). …
  • of the microscope led his head to `fail’ ( letter to WDFox, 29 October [1872] ) he had begun
  • by hearing about Panagæus!’ Darwin wrote ( letter to WDFox,  16 July [1872] ).  I

Women’s scientific participation

Summary

Observers | Fieldwork | Experimentation | Editors and critics | Assistants Darwin’s correspondence helps bring to light a community of women who participated, often actively and routinely, in the nineteenth-century scientific community. Here is a…

Matches: 19 hits

  • in South Africa. Letter 6736 - Gray, A. & J. L to Darwin, [8 & 9 May 1869] …
  • of wormholes. Letter 8611 - Cupples, A. J. to Darwin, E., [8 November1872] …
  • Letter 8676 - Treat, M. to Darwin, [13 December 1872] Mary Treat details her
  • Darwins behalf. Letter 8683 - Roberts, D. to Darwin, [17 December 1872] …
  • little treatise”. Letter 4436 - Darwin to Hooker, J. D., [26-27 March 1864] …
  • and orangs. Letter 5705 - Haast, J. F. J. von to Darwin, [4 December 1867] …
  • in a marble tablet”. Letter 6815 - Scott, J. to Darwin, [2 July 1869] John
  • 8144 - Darwin to Wedgwood, L. C., [5 January 1872] Darwin asks his niece, Lucy, …
  • 8168 - Ruck, A. R . to Darwin, H., [20 January 1872] Amy Ruck reports the results
  • Letter 8224 - Darwin to Ruck, A. R., [24 February 1872] Darwin asks his
  • Letter 8169 - Wedgwood, L. to Darwin, [20 January, 1872] Darwins niece, Lucy, gives the
  • Men: Letter 385  - Wedgwood, S. E. & J. to Darwin, [10 November 1837] …
  • at Maer Hall, Staffordshire. Letter 1219  - Hooker, J. D. to Darwin, [3 February
  • The experiments were carried outat the suggestion of Dr Hookerand what little he has ascertained
  • Women: Letter 2345 - Darwin to Hooker, J. D., [20 October 1858] Darwin
  • of style. Letter 2461  - Darwin to Hooker, J. D., [11 May 1859] Darwin
  • 8427 - Darwin to Litc hfield, H. E., [25 July 1872] Darwin thanks Henrietta for
  • Letter 2475  - Darwin to Hooker, J. D., [2 July 1859] Darwin returns the manuscript of
  • 8153  - Darwin to  Darwin, W. E., [9 January 1872] Darwin thanks his son William

Dramatisation script

Summary

Re: Design – Adaptation of the Correspondence of Charles Darwin, Asa Gray and others… by Craig Baxter – as performed 25 March 2007

Matches: 25 hits

  • writings of Asa Gray, Charles Darwin, Joseph Dalton Hooker, Jane Loring Gray Louis Agassiz, Adam
  • this actor uses the words of Jane Loring Gray, Joseph Dalton Hooker, Hugh Falconer, Louis Agassiz, …
  • of natural selection to his friend, the botanist, Joseph D Hooker GRAY:   3   Charles
  • year 1839, and copied and communicated to Messrs Lyell and Hooker in 1844, being a part of
  • DARWIN:   7   January 1844. My dear Hooker. I have beenengaged in a very presumptuous work
  • the opportunity I enjoyed of making your acquaintance at Hookers three years ago; and besides that
  • sheet of note-paper! DARWIN11   My dear HookerWhat a remarkably nice and kind
  • 22   Hurrah I got yesterday my 41st Grass! Hooker is younger than Darwin and Gray by
  • species beforeDARWIN24   My dear Hookeryou cannot imagine how pleased I am
  • on your bowels of immutability. Darwin passes to Hooker a brace of letters 25
  • there is a little rap for you. GRAY:   26   Hooker [is] dreadfully paradoxical to
  • as well as any man. I send itDarwin passes to Hooker an envelope of seeds. …
  • and Hawks have often been seen in mid Atlantic. HOOKER:   28   Thanks for your letter
  • pleased to have. DARWIN33   My dear Hooker. Thanks, also, for [your] Photograph, …
  • expression and so by no means does you justice. HOOKER:   34   I believe I have very
  • beguiled into shouldrileyou, as you say it doesHooker rightly tells me, I have no business to
  • make a very audacious remark in opposition to what I imagine Hooker has been writing and to your own
  • to tell you, that before I had ever corresponded with you, Hooker had shown me several of your
  • … – a Scottish paleobotanist and contemporary of Darwin and HookerspluttersFALCONER: …
  • I can see that you have already corrupted and half-spoiled Hooker!! DARWIN: Now when I see
  • out much fuller in my sketch copied in 1844, and read by Hooker some dozen years ago…. I should be
  • world to come. DARWIN:   56   My dearest Hooker, You will, and so will Mrs Hooker, be
  • FOUNDATIONS OF FAITH: 1857-1858 In which Gray and Hooker begin to consider the theological
  • C DARWIN, 1819 AUGUST 1862 149 C DARWIN TO J. D. HOOKER 26 JULY 1863 150
  • 25 DECEMBER 1874 206  TO A GRAY 15 JANUARY [1872] 207  FROM A GRAY 2

Darwin in letters, 1874: A turbulent year

Summary

The year 1874 was one of consolidation, reflection, and turmoil for Darwin. He spent the early months working on second editions of Coral reefs and Descent of man; the rest of the year was mostly devoted to further research on insectivorous plants. A…

Matches: 17 hits

  • by observation during prolonged intervals’ ( letter to D. T. Gardner, [ c . 27 August 1874] ). …
  • of shooting and collecting beetles ( letter from W. D. Fox, 8 May [1874] ).  Such reminiscences
  • looks backwards much more than forwards’ ( letter to W. D. Fox, 11 May [1874] ). I
  • hope.— I feel very old & helpless’  ( letter to B. J. Sulivan, 6 January [1874] ). Darwin
  • to believe in such rubbish’, he confided to Joseph Dalton Hooker ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 18
  • the publishers, he applied first to his friend Joseph Dalton Hooker, and finally borrowed one from
  • for the book may have been increased by the publication in 1872 of  Corals and coral islands , by
  • for misinterpreting Darwin on this point ( letter from J. D. Dana, 21 July 1874 ); however, he did
  • … ‘Im a grown man now’, he reminded Darwin, ‘& sh d . stand on my own footing, & if it is
  • Mivart (see  Correspondence  vol. 20, letter to St G. J. Mivart, 11 January [1872] ). To Darwin
  • views. In December, he sought advice from Huxley and Hooker, sending them a draft letter that
  • Mivart had written the article ( enclosure to letter from J. D. Hooker, 21 December 1874 ). Huxley
  • to write to Mivart directly after he knew the full result of Hookers and Huxleys representations ( …
  • or adviseable’. On Christmas Eve, Darwin wrote to Hooker that they were still in a dilemma
  • 15 th  he published that shabby rejoinder’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 24 December [1874] ).  On
  • removed as secretary of the Linnean Society  ( letter From J. D. Hooker, 29 December 1874 ). …
  • …  vol. 20, letter to Hubert Airy, 24 August 1872 ). The passage took twelve weeks aboard the

Have you read the one about....

Summary

... the atheistical cats, or the old fogies in Cambridge? We've suggested a few - some funny, some serious - but all letters you can read here.

Matches: 1 hits

  • … ... the atheistical cats, or the old fogies in Cambridge? We've suggested a few - some funny, some …

Capturing Darwin’s voice: audio of selected letters

Summary

On a sunny Wednesday in June 2011 in a makeshift recording studio somewhere in Cambridge, we were very pleased to welcome Terry Molloy back to the Darwin Correspondence Project for a special recording session. Terry, known for his portrayal of Davros in Dr…

Matches: 1 hits

  • … Lydia Becker, 2 August 1863 ; to Mary Treat, 5 January 1872 ). Click on the play …

Darwin in letters, 1868: Studying sex

Summary

The quantity of Darwin’s correspondence increased dramatically in 1868 due largely to his ever-widening research on human evolution and sexual selection.Darwin’s theory of sexual selection as applied to human descent led him to investigate aspects of the…

Matches: 20 hits

  • the accursed Index-maker’, Darwin wrote to Joseph Dalton Hooker on 6 January . Darwin had sent
  • … ). Darwin sympathised, replying on 14 January , ‘I sh d  have a very bad heart, as hard as
  • to read a few pages feel fairly nauseated’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 3 February [1868] ). But such
  • awaythat sparked the most discussion. Darwin wrote to Hooker on 23 February , ‘did you look at
  • thought it was by Gray himself, but Darwin corrected him: ‘D r  Gray would strike me in the face, …
  • editor of the  London and Westminster Review . When Hooker later tried to refute the claims of the
  • a scamp & I begin to think a veritable ass’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 1 September [1868] ). …
  • on 17 April 1868 . The letter was addressed tothe Rev d  C. Darwin M.d’; Binstead evidently
  • … (from ?, 6 April 1868). On 21 May , Darwin complained to Hooker, ‘I am bothered with heaps of
  • kind almost heroic, in you to sacrifice your hair and pay 3 d  in the cause of science
  • information on colour changes in the canary (letters from J. J. Weir, [26] March 1868 and 3
  • … , ‘almost heroic, in you to sacrifice your hair and pay 3 d  in the cause of science.’ Darwin
  • added, ‘for it is clear that I have none’ ( letter to J. J. Weir, 30 May [1868] ). Sexual
  • as ofvictorious males getting wives’ ( letter to W. D. Fox, 25 February [1868] ). Yet a
  • role of colour, sound, and smell in attracting females. J. J. Weir reported on 14 April 1868
  • Wallace that he had begun the previous year, writing to Hooker on 21 May , ‘I always distrust
  • circulated to remote parts of the world. A correspondent of Hookers distributed it in Japan ( …
  • the Linnean Society of London on 19 March. In a letter to Hooker on 21 May , he enthused over an
  • and self fertilisation , pp. 11920. He also enlisted Hooker to identify grasses that had grown
  • the previous year by James Philip Mansel Weale ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [20 May 1868] ). …

Darwin in letters, 1864: Failing health

Summary

On receiving a photograph from Charles Darwin, the American botanist Asa Gray wrote on 11 July 1864: ‘the venerable beard gives the look of your having suffered, and … of having grown older’.  Because of poor health, Because of poor health, Darwin…

Matches: 21 hits

  • exclaimed to his close friend, the botanist Joseph Dalton Hooker: ‘Hurrah! I have been 52 hours
  • 11). In a letter of [27 January 1864] , Darwin wrote to Hooker: ‘The only approach to work which
  • by which  leaves  produce tendrils’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [8 February 1864] ). Darwins
  • …  peduncles to test sensitivity, and in his request to Hooker for another specimen: ‘I want it
  • plant morphology. Many of his other correspondents, such as Hooker and Gray, had grown accustomed to
  • the  Lythrum  paper was published, Darwin remarked to Hooker in a letter of 26 November [1864] …
  • letter of 22 October [1864] , Darwin triumphantly wrote to Hooker: ‘I will fight you to the death, …
  • and 249). When Darwin requested orchid specimens from Hooker in November, he said that he did
  • certain difficult & tedious points’, Darwin asked Hooker about the possibility of Scotts
  • with his stipend being paid by Darwin himself ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [1 April 1864] ). …
  • often at odds with one another: ‘Gardeners are the very dl, & where two or three are gathered
  • enough to play your part  over  them’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, [2 April 1864] ). …
  • … … they do require very careful treatment’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 8 April 1864 ). Nevertheless
  • that in giving I am hastening the fall’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 20 April 1864 ). In his
  • a first-class cabin for the journey ( letter from J. D. Hooker, [15 August 1864] ). Darwin
  • you have bearded this lion in his den’ ( letter to B. D. Walsh, 4 December [1864] ). Walsh also
  • he spoke out on the modification of species ( letter to B. D. Walsh, 21 October [1864] ). …
  • he thought himsanguine & unsafe’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 16 February 1864 ). Hooker
  • correct if they contradicted the Bible ( see letter from J. D. Hooker, [19 September 1864] ). When
  • Lyell 1865] I shall recant for fifth time’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 22 October [1864] ). Lyell
  • for The expression of the emotions in man and animals  (1872). The Copley medal

Women as a scientific audience

Summary

Target audience? | Female readership | Reading Variation Darwin's letters, in particular those exchanged with his editors and publisher, reveal a lot about his intended audience. Regardless of whether or not women were deliberately targeted as a…

Matches: 12 hits

  • Letter 2447 - Darwin to Murray, J., [5 April 1859] Darwin sends a manuscript copy of
  • of style. Letter 2461 - Darwin to Hooker, J. D., [11 May 1859] Darwin
  • tone and style. Letter 7329 - Murray , J. to Darwin, [28 September 1870] …
  • Letter 7331 - Darwin to Murray, J., [29 September 1870] Darwin asks Murray to
  • Letter 8335 - Reade, W. W. to Darwin, [16 May 1872] Reade tells Darwin of his
  • Letter 8341 - Reade, W. W. to Darwin, [20 May 1872] Reade shares with Darwin his
  • to women. Letter 8611 - Cupples, A. J. to Darwin, E., [8 November 1872] …
  • … - Barnard, A. to Darwin, [30 March 1871] J. S. Henslows daughter, Anne, responds to
  • with her father. Letter 7651 - Wedgwood, F. J. to Darwin, H. E., [1 April 1871] …
  • be suitable. Letter 7411 - Pfeiffer, E. J. to Darwin, [before 26 April 1871] …
  • patience and care. Letter 6110 - Samuelson, J. to Darwin, [10 April 1868] …
  • is a revelation. Letter 9633 - Nevill, D. F. to Darwin, [11 September 1874] …

Darwin in letters, 1869: Forward on all fronts

Summary

At the start of 1869, Darwin was hard at work making changes and additions for a fifth edition of  Origin. He may have resented the interruption to his work on sexual selection and human evolution, but he spent forty-six days on the task. Much of the…

Matches: 16 hits

  • correcting’ ( Correspondence  vol. 16, letter to W. D. Fox, 12 December [1868] ). He may have
  • he remarked to his best friend, the botanist Joseph Dalton Hooker, ‘If I lived 20 more years, & …
  • Well it is a beginning, & that is something’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [22 January 1869] ). …
  • Darwin sent a manuscript of his response (now missing) to Hooker, remarking: ‘I should be extremely
  • blunders, as is very likely to be the case’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 13 January 1869 ). Hooker
  • principle (Nägeli 1865, pp. 289). In further letters, Hooker tried to provide Darwin with botanical
  • retrench that position following criticism from his friend Hooker, by admitting that the survival of
  • do fairly well, though if I had read you first, perhaps I d  have been less deferential towards
  • males & females, cocks & hens.—’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 13 November [1869] ). Yet
  • … & contemptalmost hatred—’ ( from Asa Gray and J. L. Gray, 8 and 9 May [1869] ). James
  • in man and animals  ( Expression ), published in 1872, more than a year after  Descent . …
  • by Wallaces assertions: ‘If you had not told me I d  have thought that they had been added by
  • commentary (Royer trans. 1870). Darwin complained to Hooker, ‘Besides her enormously long & …
  • … [her] to translateDomestic Animals”’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 19 November [1869] ). Angered by
  • by Anglican clergymen in the biology section of the meeting. Hooker described the session with some
  • suggestions to its publisher, Macmillan ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 14 November 1869 ).  Darwin

Darwin as mentor

Summary

Darwin provided advice, encouragement and praise to his fellow scientific 'labourers' of both sexes. Selected letters Letter 2234 - Darwin to Unidentified, [5 March 1858] Darwin advises that Professor C. P. Smyth’s observations are not…

Matches: 3 hits

  • … Letter 8140 - Darwin to Darwin, W. E., [3 January 1872] Darwin congratulates his son for …
  • … Letter 8146 - Darwin to Treat, M., [5 January 1872] Darwin praises Mary Treat’s …
  • … Letter 8171 - Darwin to Wedgwood, L., [21 January 1872] Darwin thanks his niece for the …

Darwin's in letters, 1873: Animal or vegetable?

Summary

Having laboured for nearly five years on human evolution, sexual selection, and the expression of emotions, Darwin was able to devote 1873 almost exclusively to his beloved plants. He resumed work on the digestive powers of sundews and Venus fly traps, and…

Matches: 5 hits

  • … on the common sundew,  Drosera rotundifolia , in August 1872, but was interrupted by revisions to  …
  • … a specimen of the carnivorous  Drosophyllum lusitanicum , Hooker wrote: “Pray work your wicked …
  • … Expression  had been published at the end of November 1872 and sold quickly. He wrote to Hooker …
  • … ( letter from E. F. Lubbock, [before 7 April 1873] ). Hooker added: “I have beaten my brains to …
  • … to worry, however, that he would overwork himself, and so Hooker volunteered to accompany him on a …

Darwin in letters, 1871: An emptying nest

Summary

The year 1871 was an extremely busy and productive one for Darwin, with the publication in February of his long-awaited book on human evolution, Descent of man. The other main preoccupation of the year was the preparation of his manuscript on expression.…

Matches: 6 hits

  • … be well abused’, he wrote to his friend Joseph Dalton Hooker on 21 January , ‘for as my son Frank …
  • … the proof-sheets, rather than waiting for the bound copies. Hooker suggested one of the reasons …
  • … tell heavily against natural selection’, Darwin wrote to Hooker on 21 January . Darwin read the …
  • … arrogant, odious beast that ever lived,’ Darwin wrote to Hooker on 16 September . Darwin …
  • … laughing. crying grinning pouting &c. &c’, he wrote to Hooker on 21 March . Darwin …
  • … in June, and was married on 31 August. Darwin remarked to Hooker on 23 July , ‘her loss will be …

Fake Darwin: myths and misconceptions

Summary

Many myths have persisted about Darwin's life and work. Here are a few of the more pervasive ones, with full debunking below...

Matches: 1 hits

  • … Many myths have persisted about Darwin's life and work. Here are a few of the more pervasive ones, …

All Darwin's letters from 1873 go online for the anniversary of Origin

Summary

To celebrate the 158th anniversary of the publication of Origin of species on 24 November, the full transcripts and footnotes of over 500 letters from and to Charles Darwin in 1873 are now available online. Read about Darwin's life in 1873 through his…

Matches: 2 hits

  • proving a true act of digestion in Drosera.  ( Letter to JDHooker, 23 October [1873] ) …
  • now been printed off, & most of them sold!  ( Letter to JDHooker, 12 January [1873] ) …

Darwin in letters, 1878: Movement and sleep

Summary

In 1878, Darwin devoted most of his attention to the movements of plants. He investigated the growth pattern of roots and shoots, studying the function of specific organs in this process. Working closely with his son Francis, Darwin devised a series of…

Matches: 4 hits

  • … and Expression ), and the final revision of Origin (1872), Darwin had turned almost …
  • … is to lessen injury to leaves from radiation’, he wrote to Hooker on 25 March ; ‘this has …
  • … he made a fool of himself at Belfast,’ Darwin wrote to Hooker on 3 or 4 March . ‘I have often …
  • … oddest thing that ever happened to me’, Darwin wrote to Hooker on 14 December. Mindful of the lack …

Darwin in letters,1870: Human evolution

Summary

The year 1870 is aptly summarised by the brief entry Darwin made in his journal: ‘The whole of the year at work on the Descent of Man & Selection in relation to Sex’.  Descent was the culmination of over three decades of observations and reflections on…

Matches: 1 hits

  • … on emotion; it would eventually appear as a separate book in 1872 ( Expression of the emotions in …

St George Jackson Mivart

Summary

In the second half of 1874, Darwin’s peace was disturbed by an anonymous article in the Quarterly Review suggesting that his son George was opposed to the institution of marriage and in favour of ‘unrestrained licentiousness’. Darwin suspected, correctly,…

Matches: 10 hits

  • was savage ( letter to G. H. Darwin, [6 December 1874] ). Hooker and Huxley between them decided
  • admit his authorship of the attack on George ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 14 December 1874 ). Huxley
  • attacked a friend of mine.’ ( Enclosure to letter from J. D. Hooker, 21 December 1874 .) A reply
  • still wrote to Mivart , in a letter that he circulated to Hooker and Darwin, that it was necessary
  • inferior Deities do battle with the infernal powers.’ What Hooker, Huxley, and Darwin were proposing
  • someone who was not willing to reply. However, for men in Hookers, Huxleys, and Darwins social
  • could look like both cliquishness and the abuse of power. (Hooker was president and Huxley secretary
  • refers to Darwins letter to Mivart of 11 January 1872 ( Correspondence vol. 20), in which he
  • was reluctant to have the matter stirred up even more. Hooker, on the other hand, was meditating
  • from John Tyndall, 28 December 1874 , and letter from J. D. Hooker, 29 December 1874 ). …

1879 Letters now online

Summary

In 1879, Darwin continued his research on movement in plants and researched, wrote, and published a short biography of his grandfather Erasmus Darwin as an introduction to a translation of an essay by Ernst Krause on Erasmus’s scientific work. Darwin’s son…

Matches: 0 hits

Darwin in letters, 1867: A civilised dispute

Summary

Charles Darwin’s major achievement in 1867 was the completion of his large work, The variation of animals and plants under domestication (Variation). The importance of Darwin’s network of correspondents becomes vividly apparent in his work on expression in…

Matches: 16 hits

  • in man and animals  ( Expression ), published in 1872. Although Darwin had been collecting
  • on 8 February [1867] to his close friend, Joseph Dalton Hooker, he explained, ‘I began a chapter
  • at what rate your work will be published’ ( letter from J. V. Carus, 5 April 1867 ). This hint of
  • to introduce the work to the German public ( letter from J. V. Carus, 15 April 1867 ). Darwin may
  • translate my book in preference to you’ ( letter to J. V. Carus, 18 April [1867] ). Darwin was not
  • like that of the date palm. Naudin had sent specimens to Hooker, who reported thewonderful
  • insecurity persisted, however, and in November he told Hooker, ‘I shall not be at all surprised if
  • as I have been taunted with concealing my opinions; & I sh d  do this immediately after the
  • the work I shall find it much better done by you than I c d  have succeeded in doing’ ( letter to
  • Douglas Campbell, published  The reign of law  (G. D. Campbell 1867), a book based on a series of
  • from T. H. Huxley, [before 7 January 1867] ). In February, Hooker asked whether Darwin had read it
  • I have not a word to say against it but such a view c d  hardly come into a scientific book’ ( …
  • I have not a word to say against it but such a view c d  hardly come into a scientific book
  • judgement he would subdue; that is yours’ ( letter from J. V. Carus, 5 April 1867 ). Darwin
  • if I had the power of writing with severity I dare say I sh d  triumph in turning poor devils
  • alert (see  Correspondence  vol. 13, letter to J. D. Hooker, 9 February [1865] and n. 4). …
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