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Darwin in letters, 1864: Failing health

Summary

On receiving a photograph from Charles Darwin, the American botanist Asa Gray wrote on 11 July 1864: ‘the venerable beard gives the look of your having suffered, and … of having grown older’.  Because of poor health, Because of poor health, Darwin…

Matches: 19 hits

  • Darwin, the American botanist Asa Gray wrote on 11 July 1864 : ‘the venerable beard gives the
  • Darwin corresponded little during the first three months of 1864, dictating nearly all his letters
  • had consulted in 1863. In a letter of 26[–7] March [1864] , Darwin exclaimed to his close friend, …
  • letters of advice from Jenner. In a letter of 15 December [1864] to the surgeon and naturalist
  • his cousin William Darwin Fox in a letter of 30 November [1864] , ‘the Copley being open to all
  • …  five years earlier. His primary botanical preoccupation in 1864 was climbing plants. He had become
  • … ( Correspondence  vol. 11). In a letter of [27 January 1864] , Darwin wrote to Hooker: ‘The
  • by which  leaves  produce tendrils’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [8 February 1864] ). Darwins
  • …  peduncles to test sensitivity, and in his request to Hooker for another specimen: ‘I want it
  • plant morphology. Many of his other correspondents, such as Hooker and Gray, had grown accustomed to
  • the  Lythrum  paper was published, Darwin remarked to Hooker in a letter of 26 November [1864] …
  • letter of 22 October [1864] , Darwin triumphantly wrote to Hooker: ‘I will fight you to the death, …
  • with his stipend being paid by Darwin himself ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [1 April 1864] ). …
  • often at odds with one another: ‘Gardeners are the very dl, & where two or three are gathered
  • enough to play your part  over  them’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, [2 April 1864] ). …
  • … … they do require very careful treatment’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 8 April 1864 ). Nevertheless
  • that in giving I am hastening the fall’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 20 April 1864 ). In his
  • a first-class cabin for the journey ( letter from J. D. Hooker, [15 August 1864] ). Darwin
  • he thought himsanguine & unsafe’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 16 February 1864 ). Hooker

Darwin's health

Summary

On 28 March 1849, ten years before Origin was published, Darwin wrote to his good friend Joseph Hooker from Great Malvern in Worcestershire, where Dr James Manby Gully ran a fashionable water-cure establishment. Darwin apologised for his delayed reply to…

Matches: 17 hits

  • …  was published, Darwin wrote to his good friend Joseph Hooker from Great Malvern in Worcestershire, …
  • establishment. Darwin apologised for his delayed reply to Hookers letter which he put down to his
  • he took Dr Gullys water cure. In Darwins letter to Hooker, he described Dr Gullys treatment: …
  • the years around 1848, 1852, 1859, and 1863. In a letter to Hooker in April of 1861for example, …
  • of a fashionable spinal ice treatment. In April 1864, Darwin attributed his improved health to Dr
  • vomiting wonderfully & I am gaining vigour .’ (letter to JDHooker, 13 April [1864] ) …
  • … (see, for example, Correspondence vol. 2, letter to J. S. Henslow, 14 October [1837] , …
  • vol. 12, letter to F. T. Buckland, 15 December [1864] ). On Darwins early stomach
  • attacks ofperiodical vomitingin a letter to W. D. Fox, [7 June 1840] ( Correspondence vol
  • 1849] , andvomiting every weekin his letter to J. D. Hooker, 28 March 1849 ( …
  • decision to consult John Chapman.  In a letter to J. D. Hooker, [20-] 22 February [1864] ( …
  • in Emma Darwins diary (DAR 242) on several occasions in 1864 and 1865. ‘Bad hysteria & sickness
  • 1995, pp. 428-9. On his difficulties reading, see letters to J. D. Hooker, 1 June [1865] and
  • from gout (see Correspondence vol. 1, letter to W. D. Fox, [25-9 January 1829] , and
  • discussed in Colp 1977, pp. 31-2, 47, 98. In his letter to J. D. Hooker, 5 March [1863] ( …
  • also Correspondence vol. 12, letter from Emma Darwin to J. D. Hooker, 17 March [1864] . …
  • for several years (see Correspondence vol. 4, letter to J. D. Hooker, 12 October 1849 , and

Darwin in letters, 1865: Delays and disappointments

Summary

The year was marked by three deaths of personal significance to Darwin: Hugh Falconer, a friend and supporter; Robert FitzRoy, captain of the Beagle; and William Jackson Hooker, director of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, and father of Darwin’s friend…

Matches: 15 hits

  • for evaluation, and persuaded his friend Joseph Dalton Hooker to comment on a paper on  Verbascum
  • committed suicide at the end of April; and William Jackson Hooker, director of the Royal Botanic
  • thriving, and when illness made work impossible, Darwin and Hooker read a number of novels, and
  • the Boys at home: they make the house jolly’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 7 January [1865] ). Darwin
  • for the Copley Medal of the Royal Society of London in 1864, had staunchly supported his candidacy, …
  • kind friend to me. So the world goes.—’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 2 February [1865] ). However, …
  • griefs & pains: these alone are unalloyed’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 3 February 1865 ). …
  • Sic transit gloria mundi, with a vengeance’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 9 February [1865] ). …
  • know it is folly & nonsense to try anyone’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 7 January [1865] ). He
  • and Darwin had given it up by early July ( see letter to J. D. Hooker, [10 July 1865] ). In
  • … ‘able to write about an hour on most days’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 22 December [1865] ). …
  • to CDs theory of transmutation, in or before November 1864 ( Correspondence vol. 12, letter to
  • … ), and wrote up his results on his voyage to India in late 1864, despite suffering from sea-sickness
  • in learned societies and in the popular press. In December 1864, George Douglas Campbell, the duke
  • this and that modification of structure’ (G. D. Campbell 1864, pp. 2756). Campbell argued further

Darwin in letters, 1868: Studying sex

Summary

The quantity of Darwin’s correspondence increased dramatically in 1868 due largely to his ever-widening research on human evolution and sexual selection.Darwin’s theory of sexual selection as applied to human descent led him to investigate aspects of the…

Matches: 20 hits

  • the mating process. In a letter to Alfred Russel Wallace in 1864, Darwin claimed that sexual
  • … (Correspondence vol. 12, letter to A. R. Wallace, 28 [May 1864] ). Darwins theory of
  • the accursed Index-maker’, Darwin wrote to Joseph Dalton Hooker on 6 January . Darwin had sent
  • … ). Darwin sympathised, replying on 14 January , ‘I sh d  have a very bad heart, as hard as
  • to read a few pages feel fairly nauseated’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 3 February [1868] ). But such
  • awaythat sparked the most discussion. Darwin wrote to Hooker on 23 February , ‘did you look at
  • thought it was by Gray himself, but Darwin corrected him: ‘D r  Gray would strike me in the face, …
  • editor of the  London and Westminster Review . When Hooker later tried to refute the claims of the
  • a scamp & I begin to think a veritable ass’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 1 September [1868] ). …
  • on 17 April 1868 . The letter was addressed tothe Rev d  C. Darwin M.d’; Binstead evidently
  • … (from ?, 6 April 1868). On 21 May , Darwin complained to Hooker, ‘I am bothered with heaps of
  • kind almost heroic, in you to sacrifice your hair and pay 3 d  in the cause of science
  • information on colour changes in the canary (letters from J. J. Weir, [26] March 1868 and 3
  • … , ‘almost heroic, in you to sacrifice your hair and pay 3 d  in the cause of science.’ Darwin
  • added, ‘for it is clear that I have none’ ( letter to J. J. Weir, 30 May [1868] ). Sexual
  • role of colour, sound, and smell in attracting females. J. J. Weir reported on 14 April 1868
  • Wallace that he had begun the previous year, writing to Hooker on 21 May , ‘I always distrust
  • circulated to remote parts of the world. A correspondent of Hookers distributed it in Japan ( …
  • the Linnean Society of London on 19 March. In a letter to Hooker on 21 May , he enthused over an
  • the previous year by James Philip Mansel Weale ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [20 May 1868] ). …

Darwin in letters, 1863: Quarrels at home, honours abroad

Summary

At the start of 1863, Charles Darwin was actively working on the manuscript of The variation of animals and plants under domestication, anticipating with excitement the construction of a hothouse to accommodate his increasingly varied botanical experiments…

Matches: 6 hits

  • … ‘some Quadrumanum animal’, as he put it in a letter to J. D. Hooker of 24[–5] February [1863] . …
  • … the origin of species particularly, worried Darwin; he told Hooker that he had once thought Lyell …
  • … lack of expertise in the subject. ‘The worst of it is’, Hooker wrote to Darwin, ‘I suppose it is …
  • … credit to his own research and that of Joseph Prestwich. Hooker wrote: ‘I fear L. will get scant …
  • … had contributed to the proofs of human antiquity. Darwin and Hooker repeatedly exchanged regrets …
  • … to the Linnean Society in a paper that was read in February 1864. He had already promised Scott that …

Darwin in letters, 1862: A multiplicity of experiments

Summary

1862 was a particularly productive year for Darwin. This was not only the case in his published output (two botanical papers and a book on the pollination mechanisms of orchids), but more particularly in the extent and breadth of the botanical experiments…

Matches: 2 hits

  • … to be referred to routinely. In November, Joseph Dalton Hooker told him: ‘you are alluded to in no …
  • … students to make observations on American species. Hooker and George Bentham at Kew were also …

Dramatisation script

Summary

Re: Design – Adaptation of the Correspondence of Charles Darwin, Asa Gray and others… by Craig Baxter – as performed 25 March 2007

Matches: 24 hits

  • writings of Asa Gray, Charles Darwin, Joseph Dalton Hooker, Jane Loring Gray Louis Agassiz, Adam
  • this actor uses the words of Jane Loring Gray, Joseph Dalton Hooker, Hugh Falconer, Louis Agassiz, …
  • of natural selection to his friend, the botanist, Joseph D Hooker GRAY:   3   Charles
  • year 1839, and copied and communicated to Messrs Lyell and Hooker in 1844, being a part of
  • DARWIN:   7   January 1844. My dear Hooker. I have beenengaged in a very presumptuous work
  • the opportunity I enjoyed of making your acquaintance at Hookers three years ago; and besides that
  • sheet of note-paper! DARWIN11   My dear HookerWhat a remarkably nice and kind
  • 22   Hurrah I got yesterday my 41st Grass! Hooker is younger than Darwin and Gray by
  • species beforeDARWIN24   My dear Hookeryou cannot imagine how pleased I am
  • on your bowels of immutability. Darwin passes to Hooker a brace of letters 25
  • there is a little rap for you. GRAY:   26   Hooker [is] dreadfully paradoxical to
  • as well as any man. I send itDarwin passes to Hooker an envelope of seeds. …
  • and Hawks have often been seen in mid Atlantic. HOOKER:   28   Thanks for your letter
  • pleased to have. DARWIN33   My dear Hooker. Thanks, also, for [your] Photograph, …
  • expression and so by no means does you justice. HOOKER:   34   I believe I have very
  • beguiled into shouldrileyou, as you say it doesHooker rightly tells me, I have no business to
  • make a very audacious remark in opposition to what I imagine Hooker has been writing and to your own
  • to tell you, that before I had ever corresponded with you, Hooker had shown me several of your
  • … – a Scottish paleobotanist and contemporary of Darwin and HookerspluttersFALCONER: …
  • I can see that you have already corrupted and half-spoiled Hooker!! DARWIN: Now when I see
  • Civil War. DARWIN157   February 1864My dear Gray. It is now six months since I
  • C DARWIN, 1819 AUGUST 1862 149 C DARWIN TO J. D. HOOKER 26 JULY 1863 150
  • 1863 157  C DARWIN TO A GRAY 25 FEBRUARY 1864 158 C DARWIN TO A GRAY 28
  • 27 OCTOBER 1862 168  TO ASA GRAY 29 OCTOBER 1864 169 FROM ASA GRAY 5

Scientific Networks

Summary

Friendship|Mentors|Class|Gender In its broadest sense, a scientific network is a set of connections between people, places, and things that channel the communication of knowledge, and that substantially determine both its intellectual form and content,…

Matches: 13 hits

  • tapping into the networks of others, such as Joseph Dalton Hooker and Asa Gray, who were at leading
  • of face-to-face contact. His correspondence with Joseph Hooker and Asa Gray illustrates how close
  • The first is between Darwin and his friend Kew botanist J. D. Hooker. The second is between Darwin
  • Letter 736Darwin, C. R. to Hooker, J. D., 23 Feb [1844] Darwin begins with a charming
  • Letter 1202Darwin, C. R. to Hooker, J. D., 6 Oct [1848] Darwin catches up on personal
  • name to specific name. Letter 1220Hooker, J. D. to Darwin, C. R., 3 Feb 1849 In
  • Letter 1260Darwin, C. R. to Hooker, J. D., 12 Oct 1849 Darwin opens by discussing their
  • Letter 4463Scott, John to Darwin, C. R., 14 Apr [1864] Scott thanks Darwin for his
  • Letter 4468Darwin, C. R. to Hooker, J. D., 19 [Apr 1864] Darwin makes another plea to his
  • Letter 4469Hooker, J. D. to Darwin, C. R., 20 Apr 1864 Hooker again refuses to help Scott, …
  • Letter 4471Darwin, C. R. to Hooker, J. D., 25 Apr [1864] Darwin thinks his friend Kew
  • Letter 4611Darwin, C. R. to Gray, Asa, 13 Sept [1864] Darwin sends abstract of John Scott
  • Letter 4441Becker, Lydia to Darwin, C. R., 30 Mar 1864 Becker sends Darwin a copy of her

The Lyell–Lubbock dispute

Summary

In May 1865 a dispute arose between John Lubbock and Charles Lyell when Lubbock, in his book Prehistoric times, accused Lyell of plagiarism. The dispute caused great dismay among many of their mutual scientific friends, some of whom took immediate action…

Matches: 15 hits

  • and Scotland (Lubbock 1862a, 1862b, and 1863a). In the July 1864 issue of Natural History Review
  • address for the British Association meeting at Bath in 1864 (C. Lyell 1864). 3  By
  • discussed the book in correspondence with Joseph Dalton Hooker, Asa Gray, and Huxley but he never
  • complaint about the book was more personal. He confided to Hooker that he wasdeeply disappointed’ …
  • but had tried, indirectly, to influence him. He told Hooker: 10 Do see Falconer
  • Falconer to tone down his attack on Lyell and agreed, on Hookers advice, to soften a passage in the
  • Darwins theory ([Lubbock] 1863b, p. 213).  In May 1864, Lubbock received a letter from
  • allude to Sir Cs explanation of the matter’. 23 Hooker, who had also been sent copies of the
  • have given Lyells explanation in print, he disagreed with Hookers assessment of Lubbocks note, …
  • reiterated his admiration for Lubbocks book ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [4 June 1865] ). A week
  • When Hooker pressed him for an opinion ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 13 July 1865 ), Darwin wrote
  • of Antiquity of man (C. Lyell 1863c; see letter from J. D. Hooker, [15 June 1865] and n. 13) …
  • 3. Letters from Charles Lyell to John Lubbock, 22 February 1864 and 24 February 1864 (British
  • 7. See Correspondence vol. 11, letter to J. D. Hooker, 24[–5] February [1863] . On Lyells
  • … ]. 10. Correspondence vol. 11, letter to J. D. Hooker, 17 March [1863] . …

Darwin’s hothouse and lists of hothouse plants

Summary

Darwin became increasingly involved in botanical experiments in the years after the publication of Origin. The building of a small hothouse - a heated greenhouse - early in 1863  greatly increased the range of plants that he could keep for scientific…

Matches: 19 hits

  • purposes’ (see  Correspondence  vol10, letter to JD. Hooker, 24 December [1862] , and
  • … (Down House MS) and  Correspondence  vol5, letter to JD. Hooker, 19 April [1855] ). Darwin
  • to touch (see  Correspondence  vol10, letter to JD. Hooker, 12 [December 1862] and n13). …
  • … [1862] ( Correspondence  vol10) Darwin told Hooker: I have almost resolved to
  • of prizes & is very observant. He believes that we sh d  succeed with a little patience; …
  • mid-January, and completed by mid-February (see letters to JD. Hooker, 13 January [1863] and
  • plants for use in a wide variety of experiments. He told Hooker that he waslooking with much
  • shall keep to curious & experimental plants’ (letter to JD. Hooker, 13 January [1863] ). …
  • with whom he had dealt over many years. In his letter to Hooker, Darwin mentioned that he hoped to
  • … ‘awful sumsthat he imagined they would cost to buy. Hookers response was unequivocal: ‘You will
  • plants you want before going to Nurserymen’ (letter from JD. Hooker, [15 January 1863] ). …
  • avoid[,] of course I must not have from Kew’ (letter to JD. Hooker, 30 January [1863] ). …
  • … ‘I long to stock it, just like a school-boy’ (letter to JDHooker, 15 February [1863] ). On
  • for, but which I did not like to ask for’ (letter to JD. Hooker, [21 February 1863] ). He had, …
  • an important focus for his experiments. By the spring of 1864, he was thinking of expansion, telling
  • …  vol12, letter to JD. Hooker, 26[–7] March 1864 ). The plan was quickly set in motion, and
  • the work, while William Ledger did the building. By August 1864, he had spent £126 10s. on the new
  • was replaced after Darwins death, and one section of the 1864 greenhouse was subsequently
  • …  vol12, letter to JD. Hooker, [25 January 1864] ). In view of the importance of Darwin

Darwin in letters,1866: Survival of the fittest

Summary

The year 1866 began well for Charles Darwin, as his health, after several years of illness, was now considerably improved. In February, Darwin received a request from his publisher, John Murray, for a new edition of  Origin. Darwin got the fourth…

Matches: 20 hits

  • on publishers, decried on one occasion by Joseph Dalton Hooker asPenny-wise Pound foolish, …
  • Fuller consideration of Darwins work was given by Hooker in an evening speech on insular floras at
  • me any harmany how I cant be idle’ ( letter to W. D. Fox, 24 August [1866] ). Towards
  • continued to refine his hypothesis in 1866. He wrote to Hooker on 16 May [1866] , ‘Iam at work
  • it was too big. ‘You must congratulate me’, he wrote to Hooker, ‘when you hear that I have sent M.S. …
  • Animals & Cult. Plantsto Printers’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 24 December [1866] ). When
  • dimorphism and trimorphism, published between 1861 and 1864, which raised questions about hybrid
  • of Darwins closest scientific friends and correspondents. Hookers research on alpine floras, Henry
  • have survived and appear in this volume), drawing Darwin, Hooker, and the botanist Charles James Fox
  • bigotted to the last inch, & will not yield’, he wrote to Hooker, who attached greater weight to
  • more than the belief of a dozen physicists’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [28 February 1866] ). Darwin
  • … ‘Your fatherentered at the same time with Dr B. J. who received him with triumph. All his friends
  • me to worship Bence Jones in future—’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 13 May 1866 ). Darwin himself
  • then went for ¾ to Zoolog. Garden!!!!!!!!!’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [28 April 1866] ). …
  • tell him the truth how little exertion I can stand. I sh d  like very much to see him, though I
  • original contract between Darwin and the New York publisher D. Appleton and Co. in 1860. …
  • … & admit how little is known on the subject’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 3 and 4 August [1866] ). …
  • see how differently we look at every thing’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 5 August [1866] ). Yet both
  • same thing in a different light from you’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 7 August 1866 ). The two
  • an expression first used by Herbert Spencer in an 1864 instalment of  Principles of biology . ( …

Natural Science and Femininity

Summary

Discussion Questions|Letters A conflation of masculine intellect and feminine thoughts, habits and feelings, male naturalists like Darwin inhabited an uncertain gendered identity. Working from the private domestic comfort of their homes and exercising…

Matches: 3 hits

  • … Letter 4377 - Haeckel, E. P. A. to Darwin, [2 January 1864] Haeckel sends Darwin some …
  • … aesthetic pleasure. Letter 4436 - Darwin to Hooker, J. D., [26-27 March 1864] …
  • … or two of them into his bedroom. Letter 4469 - Hooker, J. D. to Darwin, [20 April 1864] …

Have you read the one about....

Summary

... the atheistical cats, or the old fogies in Cambridge? We've suggested a few - some funny, some serious - but all letters you can read here.

Matches: 1 hits

  • … ... the atheistical cats, or the old fogies in Cambridge? We've suggested a few - some funny, some …

Women’s scientific participation

Summary

Observers | Fieldwork | Experimentation | Editors and critics | Assistants Darwin’s correspondence helps bring to light a community of women who participated, often actively and routinely, in the nineteenth-century scientific community. Here is a…

Matches: 17 hits

  • Letter 4523 - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, [6 June 1864] Darwins niece, Lucy, responds
  • in South Africa. Letter 6736 - Gray, A. & J. L to Darwin, [8 & 9 May 1869] …
  • of wormholes. Letter 8611 - Cupples, A. J. to Darwin, E., [8 November1872] …
  • Darwins behalf. Letter 8683 - Roberts, D. to Darwin, [17 December 1872] …
  • little treatise”. Letter 4436 - Darwin to Hooker, J. D., [26-27 March 1864] …
  • and orangs. Letter 5705 - Haast, J. F. J. von to Darwin, [4 December 1867] …
  • in a marble tablet”. Letter 6815 - Scott, J. to Darwin, [2 July 1869] John
  • Men: Letter 385  - Wedgwood, S. E. & J. to Darwin, [10 November 1837] …
  • at Maer Hall, Staffordshire. Letter 1219  - Hooker, J. D. to Darwin, [3 February
  • …  - Wright, Charles to Gray, A., [20, 25, 26 March & 1 April 1864] Charles Wright tells
  • …  - Henslow, G. to Darwin, [11 November 1865] J. S. Henslows son, George, passes on the
  • Men: Letter 1836  - Berkeley, M. J. to Darwin, [7 March 1856] Clergyman and
  • The experiments were carried outat the suggestion of Dr Hookerand what little he has ascertained
  • to feed to them. Letter 2069  - Tenant, J. to Darwin, [31 March 1857] James
  • Women: Letter 2345 - Darwin to Hooker, J. D., [20 October 1858] Darwin
  • of style. Letter 2461  - Darwin to Hooker, J. D., [11 May 1859] Darwin
  • as such”. Letter 2475  - Darwin to Hooker, J. D., [2 July 1859] Darwin

Darwin in letters, 1869: Forward on all fronts

Summary

At the start of 1869, Darwin was hard at work making changes and additions for a fifth edition of  Origin. He may have resented the interruption to his work on sexual selection and human evolution, but he spent forty-six days on the task. Much of the…

Matches: 17 hits

  • correcting’ ( Correspondence  vol. 16, letter to W. D. Fox, 12 December [1868] ). He may have
  • he remarked to his best friend, the botanist Joseph Dalton Hooker, ‘If I lived 20 more years, & …
  • Well it is a beginning, & that is something’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [22 January 1869] ). …
  • Darwin sent a manuscript of his response (now missing) to Hooker, remarking: ‘I should be extremely
  • blunders, as is very likely to be the case’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 13 January 1869 ). Hooker
  • principle (Nägeli 1865, pp. 289). In further letters, Hooker tried to provide Darwin with botanical
  • retrench that position following criticism from his friend Hooker, by admitting that the survival of
  • do fairly well, though if I had read you first, perhaps I d  have been less deferential towards
  • males & females, cocks & hens.—’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 13 November [1869] ). Yet
  • … & contemptalmost hatred—’ ( from Asa Gray and J. L. Gray, 8 and 9 May [1869] ). James
  • by Wallaces assertions: ‘If you had not told me I d  have thought that they had been added by
  • commentary (Royer trans. 1870). Darwin complained to Hooker, ‘Besides her enormously long & …
  • … [her] to translateDomestic Animals”’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 19 November [1869] ). Angered by
  • had greatly impressed Darwin when it first appeared in 1864, and the ensuing correspondence with
  • of the whole meeting was decidedly Huxleys answer to D r  M c Cann. He literally poured boiling
  • suggestions to its publisher, Macmillan ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 14 November 1869 ).  Darwin
  • as it had been since his last period of prolonged illness in 1864 and 1865, although a particularly

Darwin's notes for his physician, 1865

Summary

On 20 May 1865, Emma Darwin recorded in her diary that John Chapman, a prominent London publisher who had studied medicine in London and Paris in the early 1840s, visited Down to consult with Darwin about his ill health. In 1863 Chapman started to treat…

Matches: 3 hits

  • … a period of severe illness, which improved by March 1864 under the care of the physician William …
  • … his brain or heart to be ‘primarily affected’. In March 1864, Darwin began to consult Jenner, who …
  • … restrictions (see Correspondence vol. 12, letter to J. D. Hooker, 13 April [1864], letter from …

Darwin and Fatherhood

Summary

Charles Darwin married Emma Wedgwood in 1839 and over the next seventeen years the couple had ten children. It is often assumed that Darwin was an exceptional Victorian father. But how extraordinary was he? The Correspondence Project allows an unusually…

Matches: 1 hits

  • … period, as Darwin’s attempts to comfort his friend Joseph Hooker on the death of his six-year-old …

'An Appeal' against animal cruelty

Summary

The four-page pamphlet transcribed below and entitled 'An Appeal', was composed jointly by Emma and Charles Darwin (see letter from Emma Darwin to W. D. Fox, [29 September 1863]). The pamphlet, which protested against the cruelty of steel vermin…

Matches: 6 hits

  • … for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Annual Report, 1864, p. 32; Animal World , 1 February …
  • … with the RSPCA; however, the RSPCA Annual Report for 1864 records that 'a benevolent lady, …
  • … the Royal Horticultural Gardens, South Kensington, in June 1864 ( The Times , 27 May 1864, p. 11, …
  • … Darwin 2: 200). Although the RSPCA considered in 1864 that many game preservers had …
  • … were 'awakening to its barbarity' (RSPCA Annual Report 1864, p. 32), the use of the steel …
  • … payments being recorded from 1854 to 1861, in 1863 and 1864, from 1871 to 1875, and in 1878 and 1880 …

Was Darwin an ecologist?

Summary

One of the most fascinating aspects of Charles Darwin’s correspondence is the extent to which the experiments he performed at his home in Down, in the English county of Kent, seem to prefigure modern scientific work in ecology.

Matches: 2 hits

  • … evolution of species’, Haeckel wrote to Darwin on 9 July 1864 . ‘In your book I found all at once …
  • … is by contrast extremely modest. In a letter written in 1864 and enigmatically dated ‘Aug. Oct 8th.’ …

Darwin in letters, 1844–1846: Building a scientific network

Summary

The scientific results of the Beagle voyage still dominated Darwin's working life, but he broadened his continuing investigations into the nature and origin of species. Far from being a recluse, Darwin was at the heart of British scientific society,…

Matches: 20 hits

  • specimens by the young botanist and traveller, Joseph Dalton Hooker. More than 1200 letters between
  • and Richard Owen shows. These friends, with the addition of Hooker, were important to Darwin for
  • Darwin discussed his ideas on species mutability with Hooker, Horner, Jenyns, Lyell, Owen, and
  • after their first exchange, early in 1844, Darwin told Hooker that he was engaged in avery
  • … (it is like confessing a murder) immutable’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [11 January 1844] ). Nine
  • heterodox opinions and later in the year both Jenyns and Hooker were invited to read a manuscript
  • In the event, it was not until the beginning of 1847 that Hooker was given a fair copy of the essay
  • attributed the book to him. But, as his letters to Hooker show, Darwin carefully considered and then
  • Forbes, and Owen were deleted, Henslows was queried, and J. D. Hookers was added. Much later, by
  • on species ( Natural selection ), he had decided that Hooker was by far the best man for the task
  • an argument against the French palaeontologist Alcide dOrbigny, insisting that the vast pampas
  • Journal of researches , and his species work. Joseph Hooker and the Beagle plant
  • and apparently relieved to handover Darwins plants to Hooker, who had just returned from
  • of the Southern Hemisphere. Darwin was quick to spot in Hooker a man he judged could become the
  • laws of creation, Geographical Distribution’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [10 February 1845] ) and
  • and European botanists. Darwins questions challenged Hooker to apply his particular knowledge to
  • that is not touched upon in their correspondence. Hookers observations on classification provided
  • that of Waterhouse with respect to the animal kingdom. Hooker was also ready to discuss contemporary
  • from each other. The letters also document aspects of Hookers life: his search for a paid position, …
  • … - Darwin's work on barnacles It was also Hooker who helped Darwin in the first stages of
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