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Darwin Correspondence Project

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List of correspondents

Summary

Below is a list of Darwin's correspondents with the number of letters for each one. Click on a name to see the letters Darwin exchanged with that correspondent.    "A child of God" (1) Abberley,…

Matches: 12 hits

  • … Below is a list of Darwin's correspondents with the number of letters for each one. …
  • … child of God" (1) Abberley, John (1) …
  • … (1) Abney, W. de W. (3) Accademia dei Lincei …
  • … Adams, A. L. (1) Addison, John (1) …
  • … (1) Ainslie, O. A. (3) Airy, Hubert …
  • … (4) Alberts, Maurice (3) Albrecht, R. F. …
  • … (1) Ambrose, J. L. (3) American Academy of …
  • … James (1) Anderson, James (c) (3) …
  • … Balfour, J. H. (7) Ball, John (5) …
  • … Becher, A. B. (1) Beck, John (2) …
  • … Dareste, Camille (9) Darwin family (1) …
  • … Job, R. A. (1) John Murray (181) …

Darwin in letters, 1872: Job done?

Summary

'My career’, Darwin wrote towards the end of 1872, 'is so nearly closed. . .  What little more I can do, shall be chiefly new work’, and the tenor of his correspondence throughout the year is one of wistful reminiscence, coupled with a keen eye…

Matches: 23 hits

  • … ‘My career’, Darwin wrote towards the end of 1872, ‘is so nearly closed. . .  What little
  • of   On the origin of   species , intended to be Darwins last, and of  Expression of the
  • books brought a strong if deceptive sense of a job now done: Darwin intended, he declared to Alfred
  • on 'so difficult a subject, as evolution’ ( letter to ARWallace,  27 July [1872] ). …
  • of books and papers, and the latter formed the subject of Darwins last bookThe formation of   …
  • to spread my views’, he wrote to his publisher, John Murray, on 30 January , shortly after
  • The public are accustomed to novels for 1s’, he wrote to Murray on 8 January , but Murray
  • set the final price at 7 s.  6 d.  ( letter from RFCooke, 12 February 1872 ). …
  • remained unpublished at the end of the year ( letter from C.-FReinwald, 23 November 1872 ). …
  • the new edition in the United States, Darwin arranged with Murray to have it stereotyped. Before the
  • Whale  & duck  most beautiful’ ( letter from ARWallace, 3 March 1872 ). I
  • … `chiefly perhaps because I do it badly’ ( letter to ARWallace, 3 August [1872] ).  …
  • … , and he complained to the German zoologist Anton Dohrn on 3 February that Mivarts book had &#039
  • … ( letter from Samuel Butler to Francis Darwin, [before 30 May 1872] , and letter from Samuel
  • from his ignorance, he feels no doubts’ ( letter to FCDonders, 17 June 1872 ). Right up to the
  • Hookers cause was taken up by his friends, in particular John Lubbock and John Tyndall, as one
  • to Gladstone a week later ( enclosure to letter from John Lubbock to WEGladstone, 20 June 1872
  • Charlton Bastians recent book on the origin of life (HCBastian 1872; Wallace 1872d) left him
  • … & new views which are daily turning up’ ( letter to ARWallace, 28 August [1872] ).  …
  • Lord Sackville Cecil, to attend a séance ( letter from MCStanley, 4 June 1872 ). There was
  • photographic plates with his overseas publishers, and with John Murrays assistant, the excitable
  • of the booksellers, encouraged an originally cautious John Murray to gamble on the books success: & …
  • gift, although he doubted he would ever use it ( letter to CLDodgson, 10 December 1872 ). …

Darwin in letters, 1867: A civilised dispute

Summary

Charles Darwin’s major achievement in 1867 was the completion of his large work, The variation of animals and plants under domestication (Variation). The importance of Darwin’s network of correspondents becomes vividly apparent in his work on expression in…

Matches: 20 hits

  • …   Charles Darwins major achievement in 1867 was the completion of his large work,  …
  • couple of months were needed to index the work, a task that Darwin handed over to someone else for
  • and animals  ( Expression ), published in 1872. Although Darwin had been collecting material and
  • A global reputation The importance of Darwins network of correspondents becomes vividly
  • who might best answer the questions, with the result that Darwin began to receive replies from
  • Variation  would be based on proof-sheets received as Darwin corrected them. Closer to home, two
  • of the size of the two-volume work from his publisher, John Murray, he wrote to Murray on 3
  • a chapteron Man’. After a few days, he wrote back to Murray proposing that some of the more
  • is as good as praise for selling a Book’ ( letter to John Murray, 31 January [1867] ). A
  • and the tedious work of correction began. Darwin wrote to Murray on 18 March to say that he
  • to translate  Variation . Indeed, he told his publisher, John Murray, in a letter of 4 April
  • time it took William Sweetland Dallas to prepare the index. John Murray had engaged Dallas and
  • see your second volume onThe Struggle for Existence &c.” for I doubt if we have a sufficiency
  • … “supplemental remarks on expression”’ ( letter to A. R. Wallace, [1217] March [1867] ). Darwins
  • was sure that the colours were protective and suggested that John Jenner Weir might conduct
  • level. In his response to Wallace ( letter to A. R. Wallace, 26 February [1867] ), Darwin defended
  • to the work I shall find it much better done by you than I c d  have succeeded in doing’ ( letter
  • I have not a word to say against it but such a view c d  hardly come into a scientific book’ ( …
  • Wallace published a long article, ‘Creation by law’ (A. R. Wallace 1867c), which responded to Jenkin
  • …  for this month; except on wet days’ ( letter from H. B. Jones, 1 October [1867] ). There is no

Darwin in letters, 1868: Studying sex

Summary

The quantity of Darwin’s correspondence increased dramatically in 1868 due largely to his ever-widening research on human evolution and sexual selection.Darwin’s theory of sexual selection as applied to human descent led him to investigate aspects of the…

Matches: 20 hits

  • …   On 6 March 1868, Darwin wrote to the entomologist and accountant John Jenner Weir, ‘If any
  • and sexual selection. In  Origin , pp. 8790, Darwin had briefly introduced the concept of
  • process. In a letter to Alfred Russel Wallace in 1864, Darwin claimed that sexual selection wasthe
  • of ashort essayon man ( letter to Ernst Haeckel, 3 July 1868 ). But this work would eventually
  • domestication . Having been advertised by the publisher John Murray as early as 1865, the two
  • increased the amount of work substantially. Darwin asked Murray to intervene, complaining on 9
  • a great loss to the Book’. But Darwins angry letter to Murray crossed one from Dallas to himself, …
  • a cheque to Dallas for £55  s ., and recommended to Murray that Dallas receive additional payment. …
  • pages feel fairly nauseated’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 3 February [1868] ). But such worries were
  • profound contempt of me. I feel convinced it is by Owen’. John Edward Gray, a colleague of Richard
  • … . It is a disgrace to the paper’ ( letter from A. R. Wallace, 24 February [1868] ). The review was
  • April 1868 . The letter was addressed tothe Rev d  C. Darwin M.d’; Binstead evidently assumed
  • kind almost heroic, in you to sacrifice your hair and pay 3 d  in the cause of science
  • canary (letters from J. J. Weir, [26] March 1868 and 3 June 1868 ). ‘It was very kind’, …
  • I did not see this, or rather I saw it only obs[c]urely, & have kept only a few references.’ …
  • as life he wd find the odour sexual!’ ( letter to A . R. Wallace, 16 September [1868] ). Francis
  • mission stations in Victoria, Australia ( letter from R. B. Smyth, 13 August 1868 ); lengthy
  • of her two-month old daughter Katherine ( letter from C. M. Hawkshaw to Emma Darwin, 9 February
  • rest mostly on faith, and on accumulation of adaptations, &c) … Of course I understand your
  • to be acomplete & premeditated swindler’ ( letter to J. B. Innes, 1 December 1868 ), his

Darwin in letters, 1874: A turbulent year

Summary

The year 1874 was one of consolidation, reflection, and turmoil for Darwin. He spent the early months working on second editions of Coral reefs and Descent of man; the rest of the year was mostly devoted to further research on insectivorous plants. A…

Matches: 25 hits

  • 1874 was one of consolidation, reflection, and turmoil for Darwin. He spent the early months working
  • dispute over an anonymous review that attacked the work of Darwins son George dominated the second
  • and traveller Alexander von Humboldts 105th birthday, Darwin obliged with a reflection on his debt
  • during prolonged intervals’ ( letter to D. T. Gardner, [ c . 27 August 1874] ). The death of a
  • Descent  was published in November 1874 ( letter from R. F. Cooke, 12 November 1874 ). Though
  • had been in two volumes and had cost twenty-four shillings.) Murrays partner, Robert Francis Cooke, …
  • on subsequent print runs would be very good ( letter from R. F. Cooke, 12 November 1874 ). …
  • Quarterly Review  discussing works on primitive man by John Lubbock and Edward Burnett Tylor. It
  • of anonymous reviews. Its proprietor was none other than John Murray, Darwins publisher. So
  • wording of both the letter to the editor and the letter to Murray to accompany it. The depth of
  • to review me in a hostile spirit’ ( letter to John Murray, 11 August 1874 ). Darwin was
  • number of the Review & in the same type’  ( letter from John Murray, 12 August 1874 ). George
  • anonymous reviews. While staying with Hooker over Christmas, John Tyndall, professor at and
  • against this (Correspondence vol. 23, from J. D. Hooker, 3 January [1875] ), preferring to attack
  • in almost total failure of observations in New Zealand (see G. B. Airy ed. 1881). Darwins
  • in prettiness & snugness’ ( letter from Emma Darwin to J. B. Innes, 12 October [1874] ).   …
  • position of vicar of Deptford ( letter from Emma Darwin to J. B. Innes, 12 October [1874] ), but
  • marriage settlements, the sale was agreed in April for £300 ( letter from John Lubbock, 2 April
  • by the Kent birds’ ( letter from Edward Frankland, 30 April 1874 ). The botanist Thereza
  • in a few hours dissolve the hardest cartilage, bone & meat &c. &c.’ ( letter to W. D. …
  • more time than the positive’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 30 August [1874] ), and that, although they
  • whether at theclose of the putrefaction of flesh, skin &c, any substance is produced before
  • children shedding tears as tiny babies ( letter from F. S. B. François de Chaumont, 29 April 1874
  • … ( Circular to John Lubbock, P. L. Sclater, Charles Lyell, W. B. Carpenter, and Michael Foster, [7
  • Sharpe for promotion at the British Museum ( letter to R. B. Sharpe, 24 November [1874] ).  He

Origin

Summary

Darwin’s most famous work, Origin, had an inauspicious beginning. It grew out of his wish to establish priority for the species theory he had spent over twenty years researching. Darwin never intended to write Origin, and had resisted suggestions in 1856…

Matches: 21 hits

  • Darwins most famous work, Origin, had an inauspicious beginning. It grew
  • species theory he had spent over twenty years researching. Darwin never intended to write Origin, …
  • of the first public presentation of documents relating to Darwins species theory together with
  • Down for a few weeks to the Isle of Wight. Although Darwin and Wallaces papers were
  • whether he would manage to restrict the length to just 30 pages of the Linnean Journal . In reply
  • to whole affair to him: By an odd coincidence, M r  Wallace in the Malay Archipelago sent
  • subject. ’ Abstracting and skeletonizing By 30 July, now more comfortably settled in
  • While still on the Isle of Wight, Darwin also heard from John Stevens Henslow, his old mentor and
  • have just killed all the scores of cross-breds’, he told W. B. Tegetmeier on 8 September, inviting
  • pamphlet. ’ On the 4 October, in a letter to T. C. Eyton explaining his change of plans regarding
  • views were apparent when he reported to Wallace thatD r . Hooker has become almost as
  • In late March, Lyell had a word with his own publisher, John Murray, who had already published
  • light of this, Darwin asked Lyell whether he shouldtell Murray that my Book is not more  un
  • … ’  Even before seeing Darwins manuscript, Murray objected to the termsabstractand ‘ …
  • preservation of favoured races” ’, he told Lyell. On 31 March 1859, Darwin wrote to Murray
  • length, and the terms he expected; he also acknowledged that Murray wished to see the manuscript
  • I publish for Sir Charles Lyell ’. Darwin was uneasy. Murray, he thought, should see the manuscript
  • origin of all animate forms.’  Moreover, Darwin warned Murray, ‘ it would be a stigma on my work
  • as weak as a child’, incapable of anything except his3 hours daily work at Proof-sheets ’. …
  • I have been thinking that if I am much execrated as atheist &c, whether the admission of
  • of all living beings,—on their lines of migration &c &c. ’   Reference: …

Darwin's in letters, 1873: Animal or vegetable?

Summary

Having laboured for nearly five years on human evolution, sexual selection, and the expression of emotions, Darwin was able to devote 1873 almost exclusively to his beloved plants. He resumed work on the digestive powers of sundews and Venus fly traps, and…

Matches: 26 hits

  • evolution, sexual selection, and the expression of emotions, Darwin was able to devote 1873 almost
  • … (1875) and  Cross and self fertilisation  (1876). Darwins son Francis became increasingly
  • career to become his fathers scientific secretary. Darwin had always relied on assistance from
  • Franciss decision. A large portion of the letters Darwin received in 1873 were in response
  • the previous year. As was typical, readers wrote to Darwin personally to offer suggestions, …
  • some of which were incorporated in a later edition. Darwin also contributed to discussions in the
  • Francis Galtons work on inherited talent, which prompted Darwin to reflect on the traits and
  • Thomas Lauder Brunton, a specialist in pharmacology, and John Scott Burdon Sanderson, a professor at
  • … “for Heaven knows when it will be ready” ( letter to John Murray, 4 May [1873] ). Keeping
  • of the great principle of inheritance!” ( letter to F. S. B. F. de Chaumont, 3 February [1873] ). …
  • civilisation and good breeding ( letter from Henry Reeks, 3 March 1873 ). Robert Swinhoe
  • with leading physiologists such as David Ferrier and John Hughlings Jackson. Darwin declined to
  • of the disease ( letter to James Crichton-Browne, 30 December 1873 ). Instinct  In
  • without instruction or previously acquired knowledge” (A. R. Wallace 1870, p. 204). Moggridge
  • some with his finger ( letter to  Nature , [before 3 April 1873] ). Moggridge suggested the
  • offend his father ( enclosure to letter from T. H. Huxley, 3 December 1873 ).  In April, …
  • fund was first suggested in early April by Katharine Murray Lyell in conversation with Emma Darwin, …
  • A group of Huxleys close friends, including Hooker, John Lubbock, Herbert Spencer, John Tyndall, …
  • the passage of purgatory” ( letter from Andrew Clark, 3 September 1873 ). Revising
  • edition was called for. There were commercial advantages for Murray in bringing out a substantially
  • believes whether or not they are sound” ( letter to A. R. Wallace, 17 November 1873 ). But no
  • your own power & usefulness”, citing the examples of John Stuart Mill and Charles Lyell, who
  • from Ernst Meitzen, 17 January 1873 ). A poor-law officer, John Farr, wrote: “Faith like Species, …
  • more permanent than species are permanent” ( letter from John Farr, 7 July 1873 ). Further
  • unorthodoxy, troubling and potentially undermining (J. R. Moore 1985, pp. 4712). A courted
  • a personification of Natural Filosofy” ( letter from J. C. Costerus and N. D. Doedes, 18 March 1873

Darwin’s reading notebooks

Summary

In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he wished to read in Notebook C (Notebooks, pp. 319–28). In 1839, these lists were copied and continued in separate notebooks. The first of these reading notebooks (DAR 119…

Matches: 23 hits

  • In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he wished to
  • … (DAR 119) opens with five pages of text copied from Notebook C and carries on through 1851; the
  • used these notebooks extensively in dating and annotating Darwins letters; the full transcript
  • … *128). For clarity, the transcript does not record Darwins alterations. The spelling and
  • book had been consulted. Those cases where it appears that Darwin made a genuine deletion have been
  • the transcript) and the non-scientific on the right (labelledb’). He continued this separation of
  • and this manuscript catalogue is in the Darwin Library (AC.34). Darwins books were bequeathed to
  • to be Read [DAR *119: Inside Front Cover] C. Darwin June 1 st . 1838
  • Surgeons [DAR *119: 1] Books to be Read 3Traité de la Folie des
  • … [DAR *119: 2v.] Whites regular gradation in man [C. White 1799] Lindleys
  • Archipelago [Crawfurd 1820] Raffeles d[itt]o [T. S. B. Raffles 1817] Buffon Suites
  • 183941]— in Geograph Soc Siebolds Japan [P. F. B. von Siebold 183350]— d[itt]o Kalm
  • Domestic Improvement ] Loudons. Journal of Nat Hist Z & B [ Magazine of Natural History
  • Nemesis to China [Bernard 1844]. The Emigrant, Head [F. B. Head 1846] St. Johns
  • 1766] Count Dandalo on silk worm Eng. Translat 1825Murray [Dandolo 1825] /good/ M rs
  • B.M. 6. 6. Black Edin. Longman [Ramsay 1848] St. Johns Nat. Hist. of Sutherlanshire, Murray
  • … [Fellows 1839] Catherine 48 Life of Collins R.A. [Collins 1848] Phases of Faith
  • Liebigs Lectures on Chemistry [Liebig 1851]. Sir John Davies. China during the War and Peace
  • … ] to end of Vol: XVIII & Part I. of V. 19 (1843) 25. Murray Domestic Poultry.— Domestic
  • many vols. I have read.— [DAR *128: 149] Murray Geograph. Distrib. Price William
  • 1848Memoirs of the life of William   Collins, Esq., R.A.  2 vols. London.  *119: 23; 119: …
  • by Richard Owen.  Vol. 4 of  The works of John Hunter, F.R.S. with notes . Edited by James F. …
  • Robert. 1843Memoirs of the life of John   Constable, R.A., composed chiefly of his letters. …

Darwin in letters,1866: Survival of the fittest

Summary

The year 1866 began well for Charles Darwin, as his health, after several years of illness, was now considerably improved. In February, Darwin received a request from his publisher, John Murray, for a new edition of  Origin. Darwin got the fourth…

Matches: 21 hits

  • The year 1866 began well for Charles Darwin, as his health, after several years of illness, was now
  • of scientific admirers at Down, among them Robert Caspary, John Traherne Moggridge, and Ernst
  • Bence Jones: ‘I am able now to walk daily on an average 3½ miles & often one mile at a stretch…. …
  • easy work for about 1½ hours every day’ ( letter to H. B. Jones, 3 January [1866] ). Darwin had
  • daily to make the chemistry go on better’ ( letter from H. B. Jones, 10 February [1866] ). …
  • regime led to Darwins being teased by his neighbour, John Lubbock, about the prospect of riding to
  • with our beagles before the season is over’ ( letter from John Lubbock, 4 August 1866 ). More
  • of which Tegetmeier had agreed to supervise ( letter to W. B. Tegetmeier, 16 January [1866] ). …
  • On 21 February Darwin received notification from John Murray that stocks of the third edition of  …
  • you go on, after the startling apparition of your face at R.S. Soirèewhich I dreamed of 2 nights
  • London, like what I was 7 or 8 years agoone day I paid 3 calls! & then went for ¾ to Zoolog. …
  • so you are in for it’ ( letter from H. E. Darwin, [  c . 10 May 1866] ). Henriettas
  • teleological development ( see for example, letter to C. W. Nägeli, 12 June [1866] ). Also in
  • common broom ( Cytisus scoparius ) and the white broom ( C. multiflorus ) in his botanical
  • and June on the subject of  Rhamnus catharticus  (now  R. cathartica ). Darwin had become
  • of separate sexes. William gathered numerous specimens of  R. catharticus , the only species of  …
  • little is known on the subject’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 3 and 4 August [1866] ). And on the next
  • replied with a modified list, adding Fritz Müllers  Für Darwin , and a recent fossil discovery in
  • selection, and with special creation ( letter from W. R. Grove, 31 August 1866 ). Hooker later
  • … ‘business would be totally paralysed’. Similarly, John Murray gave as a reason for his decision to
  • indeed at poor Susans loneliness’ ( letter from E. C. Langton to Emma and Charles Darwin, [6 and 7

Darwin in letters, 1880: Sensitivity and worms

Summary

There are summaries of all Darwin's letters from the year 1880 on this website.  The full texts of the letters are not yet available online but are in volume 28 of the print edition of The correspondence of Charles Darwin, published by Cambridge…

Matches: 24 hits

  • There are summaries of all Darwin's letters from the year 1880 on this website.  The full texts
  • 28 of the print edition of The correspondence of Charles Darwin , published by Cambridge
  • to adapt to varying conditions. The implications of Darwins work for the boundary between animals
  • in zoology. New studies of animal instincts by George John Romanes drew upon Darwins early
  • of evolution and creation. Many letters flowed between Darwin and his children, as he took delight
  • Financial support for science was a recurring issue, as Darwin tried to secure a Civil List pension
  • with Samuel Butler, prompted by the publication of Erasmus Darwin the previous year. …
  • character is of much value to me’ ( letter to C. H. Tindal, 5 January 1880 ). Darwin had employed
  • Kingdom, & even the world’ ( letter from J. L. Chester, 3 March 1880 ). Darwins sons George
  • Darwins Life . ‘In an endeavour to explain away y r . treatment of [William Alvey Darwin],’ …
  • by anticipation the position I have taken as regards D r Erasmus Darwin in my book Evolution old
  • regret that I did not do so’ ( letter to Samuel Butler, 3 January 1880 ). At the top of Butlers
  • to the end’, added her husband Richard ( letter from R. B. Litchfield, 1 February 1880 ). Even the
  • It is a horrid disease’ ( letter from T. H. Huxley, 3 February 1880 ).                 All
  • lettermade me open my eyes’, Gray replied on 3 February , but he affirmed his original
  • shake their heads in the same dismal manner as you & M r . Murray did, when I told them my
  • in a book about beetles the impressive wordscaptured by C. Darwin”. … This seemed to me glory
  • … ‘but the subject has amused me’ ( letter to W. C. McIntosh, 18 June 1880 ). Members of the family
  • aided in any way direct attacks on religion’ ( letter to E. B. Aveling, 13 October 1880 ). Finally
  • great doctrines …“Come of Age”‘ ( letter from W. C. Williamson to Emma Darwin, 2 September 1880 ). …
  • of Epping Forest’. In October, Darwin had discussions with John Lubbock and Huxley and was
  • he would think me mad or impertinent’ ( letter to A. B. Buckley, 31 October [1880] ). Buckley
  • his voice as clearly as if he were present’ (letters to C. W. Fox, 29 March 1880 and 10 [April
  • the years end, a Christmas card from another old friend, John Maurice Herbert, inspired happy

Women’s scientific participation

Summary

Observers | Fieldwork | Experimentation | Editors and critics | Assistants Darwin’s correspondence helps bring to light a community of women who participated, often actively and routinely, in the nineteenth-century scientific community. Here is a…

Matches: 26 hits

  • … |  Editors and critics  |  Assistants Darwins correspondence helps bring to light a
  • community. Here is a selection of letters exchanged between Darwin and his workforce of women
  • Women: Letter 1194 - Darwin to Whitby, M. A. T., [12 August 1849] Darwin
  • breeds, or peculiarities in inheritance. Letter 3787 - Darwin, H. E. to Darwin, [29
  • Letter 4258 - Becker, L. E. to Darwin, [31 July 1863] Lydia Becker details her
  • in her garden. Letter 4523 - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, [6 June 1864] …
  • Egypt. Letter 7223 - Darwin to Wedgwood, L. C., [8 June 1867 - 72] Darwin
  • Letter 5817 - Darwin to Huxley, T. H., [30 January 1868] Darwin asks Thomas Huxley to
  • Henrietta. Letter 7179 - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, [5 May 1870] …
  • to Darwin, [1873] Ellen Lubbock, wife of naturalist John Lubbock, responds to Darwins
  • and bird observations from Calcutta. Letter 3634 - Darwin to Gray, A., [1 July 1862
  • the wallpaper. Letter 5756 - Langton, E. & C. to Wedgwood S. E., [after 9
  • 6815 - Scott, J. to Darwin, [2 July 1869] John Scott responds to Darwins queries
  • Letter 1701 - Morris, M. H. to Prior, R. C. A., [17 June 1855] Margaretta Hare Morris
  • shores of mountain lakes in Pennsylvania. Letter 3681  - Wedgwood, M. S. to Darwin, …
  • Lychnis diurna. Letter 8168 - Ruck, A. R . to Darwin, H., [20 January 1872] …
  • lawn. Letter 8224 - Darwin to Ruck, A. R., [24 February 1872] Darwin
  • Letter 1701  - Morris, M. H. to Prior, R. C. A., [17 June 1855] Margaretta Hare Morris
  • of Wilmington. Letter 10390 - Herrick, S. M. B . to Darwin, [12 February 1876] …
  • of his garden. Letter 4233  - Tegetmeier, W. B. to Darwin, [29 June - 7 July 1863] …
  • …  - Weir, J. J. to Darwin, [24 March 1868] John Weir describes experiments he is undertaking
  • garden ”. Letter 6083  - Casparay, J. X. R. to Darwin, [2 April 1868] …
  • challenging ideas. Letter 2447 - Darwin to Murray, J., [5 April 1859] …
  • editorial criticism of a paper written by English naturalist John Lubbock. In addition to offering
  • service. Letter 3298  - Darwin to Clarke, W. B., [25 October 1861] Darwin asks
  • …  - Weir, J. J. to Darwin, [24 March 1868] John Weir describes experiments he is undertaking

Darwin in letters, 1864: Failing health

Summary

On receiving a photograph from Charles Darwin, the American botanist Asa Gray wrote on 11 July 1864: ‘the venerable beard gives the look of your having suffered, and … of having grown older’.  Because of poor health, Because of poor health, Darwin…

Matches: 27 hits

  • On receiving a photograph from Charles Darwin, the American botanist Asa Gray wrote on 11 July
  • … … of having grown older’. This portrait, the first of Darwin with his now famous beard, had been
  • 52 hours without vomiting!! In the same month, Darwin began to consult William Jenner, …
  • prescribed a variety of antacids and purgatives, and limited Darwins fluid intake; this treatment
  • the dimorphic aquatic cut-grass  Leersia . In May, Darwin finished his paper on  Lythrum
  • he had set aside the previous summer. In October, Darwin let his friends know that on his
  • to the surgeon and naturalist Francis Trevelyan Buckland, Darwin described his symptoms in some
  • November and December were also marked by the award to Darwin of the Royal Societys Copley Medal; …
  • explained to his cousin William Darwin Fox in a letter of 30 November [1864] , ‘the Copley being
  • that natureabhors self-fertilisation’ ( Orchids , p. 359), he continued studying the adaptations
  • of a paper by another of his orchid correspondents, John Traherne Moggridge, who in June sent him
  • of insect pollinators in 1864 and following years. John Scott again Much of Darwins
  • plight of another of Darwins fellow orchid-experimenters, John Scott. Their correspondence had been
  • five years. Scott felt that his superiors, James McNab and John Hutton Balfour, no longer treated
  • indomitable perseverance, and his knowledge’ ( letter to John Scott, 10 June 1864 ). Hooker met
  • supporton the grounds of science’ ( letter to John Scott, 9 April 1864 ), but Scott declined
  • 5 September 1864 ). Fritz Müeller sent his bookFür Darwin , and Darwin had it translated by a
  • him except á la Darwin!’ ( letter from Hugh Falconer, 3 November 186[4] ). The French