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Darwin in letters, 1863: Quarrels at home, honours abroad

Summary

At the start of 1863, Charles Darwin was actively working on the manuscript of The variation of animals and plants under domestication, anticipating with excitement the construction of a hothouse to accommodate his increasingly varied botanical experiments…

Matches: 21 hits

  • At the start of 1863, Charles Darwin was actively working on the manuscript of  The variation of
  • markedly, reflecting a decline in his already weak health. Darwin then began punctuating letters
  • am languid & bedeviled … & hate everybody’. Although Darwin did continue his botanical
  • letter-writing dwindled considerably. The correspondence and Darwins scientific work diminished
  • of the water-cure. The treatment was not effective and Darwin remained ill for the rest of the year. …
  • the correspondence from the year. These letters illustrate Darwins preoccupation with the
  • detailed anatomical similarities between humans and apes, Darwin was full of praise. He especially
  • Britains scientific circles following the publication of Lyells and Huxleys books. Three
  • Origin had (see  Correspondence  vol. 8, letter to Charles Lyell, 10 January [1860] ). In the
  • with animals now extinct had been rapidly accumulating. Lyells argument for a greater human
  • as well as on evidence collected earlier in the century. Lyells  Antiquity of man  and Huxleys  …
  • arguments for species change. In this context, Lyells discussion of the origin of species
  • that of inferior animals made himgroan’ ( letter to Charles Lyell, 6 March [1863] ). Darwin
  • out that species were not separately created’ ( letter to Charles Lyell, 17 March [1863] ). Public
  • you, as my old honoured guide & master’ ( letter to Charles Lyell, 6 March [1863] ). …
  • stronger statements regarding species change ( letter from Charles Lyell, 11 March 1863 ). The
  • letter to J. D. Dana, 20 February [1863] , and letter to Charles Lyell, 6 March [1863] ). …
  • bookfrom which he hadgained nothing’ ( letter to Charles Lyell, 1213 March [1863] ). …
  • sentence from the second edition of  Antiquity of man  (C. Lyell 1863b, p. 469), published in
  • very slowly recovering, but am very weak’ ( letter to A. R. Wallace, [29 September? 1863] ). …
  • Thomass Hospital, London ( letter from George Busk, [ c. 27 August 1863] ). Brinton, who

List of correspondents

Summary

Below is a list of Darwin's correspondents with the number of letters for each one. Click on a name to see the letters Darwin exchanged with that correspondent.    "A child of God" (1) Abberley,…

Matches: 13 hits

  • … Below is a list of Darwin's correspondents with the number of letters for each one. …
  • … Edwards & Co. (1) Babbage, Charles (10) …
  • … (1) Berliner Gesellschaft für Anthropologie, Ethnologie und Urgeschichte …
  • … Bond, Frederick (2) Boner, Charles (5) …
  • … Edward (1) Bradlaugh, Charles (2) …
  • … Brayley, E. W. (1) Breese, Charles (1) …
  • … Samuel (b) (14) Buxton, Charles (2) …
  • … Chapman, John (4) Charles, R. F. (2) …
  • … Crawfurd, John (3) Crawley, Charles (2) …
  • … Virginius (3) Dallas, Charles (1) …
  • … Dareste, Camille (9) Darwin family (1) …
  • … Dixie, Florence (3) Dixon, Charles (1) …
  • … Lydekker, R. (1) Lyell, Charles (277) …

Darwin in letters, 1860: Answering critics

Summary

On 7 January 1860, John Murray published the second edition of Darwin’s Origin of species, printing off another 3000 copies to satisfy the demands of an audience that surprised both the publisher and the author. It wasn't long, however, before ‘the…

Matches: 23 hits

  • 7 January 1860, John Murray published the second edition of Darwins  Origin of species , printing
  • surprised both the publisher and the author. One week later Darwin was stunned to learn that the
  • But it was the opinion of scientific men that was Darwins main concern. He eagerly scrutinised each
  • his views. ‘One cannot expect fairness in a Reviewer’, Darwin commented to Hooker after reading an
  • … ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 3 January [1860] ). Darwins magnanimous attitude soon faded, …
  • butunfairreviews that misrepresented his ideas, Darwin began to feel that without the early
  • it was his methodological criticism in the accusation that Darwin haddeserted the inductive track, …
  • to J. S. Henslow, 8 May [1860] ). Above all else Darwin prided himself on having developed a
  • it comes in time to be admitted as real.’ ( letter to C. J. F. Bunbury, 9 February [1860] ). This
  • current knowledge could not illuminate thismystery’. Charles Lyell worried, among other things, …
  • did not necessarily lead to progression ( letter to Charles Lyell, 18 [and 19 February 1860] ). To
  • of reasoning about global change. Darwin also knew that Lyell was a powerful potential ally. Indeed, …
  • plant species and varieties than from animal breeding. With Lyell also questioning how interbreeding
  • because more accustomed to reasoning.’ ( letter to A. R. Wallace, 18 May 1860 ). Darwin
  • perfected structure as the eye. As Darwin admitted to Lyell, Gray, and others, imagining how
  • Certainly this was a major difficulty standing in the way of Lyells acceptance of the theory, as
  • is in same predicament with other animals’ ( letter to Charles Lyell, 10 January [1860] )— he and
  • of the scientifically literate clergymen Baden Powell and Charles Kingsley attested. Moreover, …
  • … (like Lyell) to retract their support altogether (letters to Charles Lyell, 1 June [1860] and
  • different opposers view the subject’ ( letter to Charles Lyell, 15 February [1860] ); later he
  • better fun observing is than writing.—’ ( letter to Charles Lyell, 12 September [1860] ). Despite
  • … & not amuse myself with interludes.—’ (letters to Charles Lyell, 24 November [1860] , and to
  • daughter Annes fatal illness never far from their minds, Charles and Emma did whatever they could

Darwin in letters, 1858-1859: Origin

Summary

The years 1858 and 1859 were, without doubt, the most momentous of Darwin’s life. From a quiet rural existence filled with steady work on his ‘big book’ on species, he was jolted into action by the arrival of an unexpected letter from Alfred Russel Wallace…

Matches: 19 hits

  • 1858 and 1859 were, without doubt, the most momentous of Darwins life. From a quiet rural existence
  • Russel Wallace. This letter led to the first announcement of Darwins and Wallaces respective
  • the composition and publication, in November 1859, of Darwins major treatise  On the origin of
  • …  exceeded my wildest hopes By the end of 1859, Darwins work was being discussed in
  • as he jokingly called it) to his views of close friends like Charles Lyell, Joseph Dalton Hooker, …
  • concepts of creation. ‘When I was in spirits’, he told Lyell at the end of 1859, ‘I sometimes
  • infinitely  exceeded my wildest hopes.—’ ( letter to Charles Lyell, 25 [November 1859] ). This
  • The 'big book' The year 1858 opened with Darwin hard at work preparing hisbig
  • appropriate. The correspondence shows that at any one time Darwin was engaged in a number of
  • his reason or his own opinion. Hewett Cottrell Watson and Charles Cardale Babington thought that in
  • work—& that I confess made me a little lowbut I c d . have borne it, for I have the
  • and dismay is evident in the letter he subsequently wrote to Charles Lyell, as Wallace had requested
  • his terms now stand as Heads of my Chapters.’ ( letter to Charles Lyell, 18 [June 1858] ). …
  • Following Francis DarwinLL 2: 11617) and relying on Charles Lyells endorsement, the editors
  • with scarlet fever, currently sweeping through the village. Charles Waring Darwins condition
  • work. Again, he called upon Lyell for advice ( letter to Charles Lyell, 28 March [1859] ). Lyell
  • from the title of the forthcoming book ( letter to Charles Lyell, 30 March [1859] ). Darwin next
  • on the origin of species and varieties’ (letters to Charles Lyell, 28 March [1859] , and to
  • it is impossible that men like Lyell, Hooker, Huxley, H. C. Watson, Ramsay &c would change their

Fake Darwin: myths and misconceptions

Summary

Many myths have persisted about Darwin's life and work. Here are a few of the more pervasive ones, with full debunking below...

Matches: 1 hits

  • … Many myths have persisted about Darwin's life and work. Here are a few of the more pervasive …

Darwin in letters, 1856-1857: the 'Big Book'

Summary

In May 1856, Darwin began writing up his 'species sketch’ in earnest. During this period, his working life was completely dominated by the preparation of his 'Big Book', which was to be called Natural selection. Using letters are the main…

Matches: 21 hits

  • On 14 May 1856, Charles Darwin recorded in his journal that heBegan by Lyells advice  writing
  • by the preparation of this manuscript. Although advised by Lyell to publish only a brief outline
  • Natural selection . Determined as he was to publish, Darwin nevertheless still felt cautious
  • this process. Still prominent in his immediate circle were Charles Lyell and Joseph Dalton Hooker, …
  • specialist in Madeiran entomology, Thomas Vernon Wollaston. Darwin also came to rely on the caustic
  • in London. Natural Selection Not all of Darwins manuscript on species has been
  • of pigeons, poultry, and other domesticated animals. As Darwin explained to Lyell, his studies, …
  • of how selection might work in nature ( letter from Charles Lyell, 12 May 1856, n. 10 ). He was
  • can William Bernhard Tegetmeier continued to help Darwin acquire much of the material for
  • on domestic animals in India and elsewhere. William Darwin Fox supplied information about cats, dogs
  • mastiffs. The disparate facts were correlated and checked by Darwin, who adroitly used letters, …
  • can.’ ( letter to W. D. Fox, 8 February [1857] ). Darwin also attempted to test ideas
  • …  not a bird be killed (by hawk, lightning, apoplexy, hail &c) with seeds in crop, & it would
  • to William Erasmus Darwin, [26 February 1856] and to Charles Lyell, 3 May [1856] ). …
  • 21 [July 1857] ). The problem of careers for his six boys (Charles Waring Darwin, the sixth and
  • and the preparation of his manuscript ( letter to A. R. Wallace, 1 May 1857 ) seem innocuous and
  • writing in part to establish his priority in this area, for Charles Lyell thought that Wallaces
  • All the available material seems to indicate that it was Lyell rather than Darwin who feared the
  • given on an occasion other than the one previously supposed. Charles and Mary Elizabeth Lyell
  • up to London to see Lyell to discuss it further ( letter to Charles Lyell, 3 May [1856] ). It was
  • not embrace the whole Lamarckian doctrine.’ ( letter from Charles Lyell, 12 May 1856, n. 7 ). The

Dramatisation script

Summary

Re: Design – Adaptation of the Correspondence of Charles Darwin, Asa Gray and others… by Craig Baxter – as performed 25 March 2007

Matches: 22 hits

  • 1 Re: DesignAdaptation of the Correspondence of Charles Darwin, Asa Gray and othersby
  • as the creator of this dramatisation, and that of the Darwin Correspondence Project to be identified
  • from the correspondence or published writings of Asa Gray, Charles Darwin, Joseph Dalton Hooker, …
  • following: Actor 1Asa Gray Actor 2Charles Darwin Actor 3In the dress
  • Agassiz, Adam Sedgwick, A Friend of John Stuart Mill, Emma Darwin, Horace Darwinand acts as a sort
  • the play unfolds and acting as a go-between between Gray and Darwin, and between the audience and
  • this, he sends out copies of his Review of the Life of Darwin. At this time in his life, Asa
  • friends in England, copies of hisReview of the Life of Darwin’… pencilling the address so that it
  • the botanist, Joseph D Hooker GRAY:   3   Charles Darwinmade his home on the border
  • are kept in check by a constitutional weakness. DARWIN: A plain but comfortable brick
  • the year 1839, and copied and communicated to Messrs Lyell and Hooker in 1844, being a
  • at the expense of Agassiz. DARWIN:   20   Lyell told me, that Agassiz, having a
  • … – to be falseYours most sincerely and gratefully Charles Darwin. CREED AND FEVER: 1858
  • forgetfuless of your darling. BOOKS BY THE LATE CHARLES DARWIN: 1863-1865 In which
  • and officially die. And then publish booksby the late Charles Darwin’. Darwin takes up
  • …   173   Ever yours cordially (though an Englishman) Charles Darwin. GRAY174   …
  • paragraph, in which I quote and differ from you[r178   doctrine that each variation has been
  • at an unexpected and probably transient notorietyCharles Darwin died on the 19th April
  • ARTS AND SCIENCES, PROCEEDINGS XVII, 1882 4  C DARWIN TO JD HOOKER 10 MAY 1848
  • DARWIN TO A GRAY, 4 JULY 1858 48  C DARWIN TO LYELL, 18 JUNE 1858 49  C
  • GRAY TO JD HOOKER, 18 FEBRUARY 1861 115 A GRAY TO CHARLES WRIGHT, 17 APRIL 1862
  • TO ASA GRAY 20 APRIL 1863 174 FROM A GRAY TO CHARLES DARWIN, 24 JULY 1865

Language: key letters

Summary

How and why language evolved bears on larger questions about the evolution of the human species, and the relationship between man and animals. Darwin presented his views on the development of human speech from animal sounds in The Descent of Man (1871),…

Matches: 13 hits

  • human species, and the relationship between man and animals. Darwin presented his views on the
  • he first began to reflect on the transmutation of species. Darwins correspondence reveals the scope
  • he exchanged information and ideas. Letter 346Darwin, C. R. to Darwin, C. S., 27 Feb 1837
  • one stock.” Letter 2070Wedgwood, Hensleigh to Darwin, C. R., [before 29 Sept 1857] …
  • because we can trace the elements into Latin, German &c. but I see much the same sort of thing
  • down of former continents.” Letter 3054Darwin, C. R. to Lyell, Charles, 2 Feb [1861] …
  • that languages, like species, were separately created. Darwin writes to the geologist Charles Lyell
  • him is perfectly logical.” Letter 5605Darwin, C. R. to Müller, J. F. T., 15 Aug [1867] …
  • Letter 7040Wedgwood, Hensleigh to Darwin, C. R., [1868-70?] As Darwin began to work on
  • growing to such a stageLetter 8367Darwin, C. R. to Wright, Chauncey, 3 June [1872] …
  • altering the breed. Letter 8962Darwin, C. R. to Max Müller, Friedrich, 3 July 1873
  • Letter 10194Max Müller, Friedrich to Darwin, C. R., 13 Oct [1875] For Müller, human and
  • … […]” Letter 9887Dawkins, W. B. to Darwin, C. R., 14 Mar 1875 The relationship

Darwin in letters, 1837–1843: The London years to 'natural selection'

Summary

The seven-year period following Darwin's return to England from the Beagle voyage was one of extraordinary activity and productivity in which he became recognised as a naturalist of outstanding ability, as an author and editor, and as a professional…

Matches: 23 hits

  • The seven-year period following Darwin's return to England from the Beagle  voyage was one
  • a family Busy as he was with scientific activities, Darwin found time to re-establish family
  • close contact. In November 1838, two years after his return, Darwin became engaged to his cousin, …
  • daughter, Anne Elizabeth, moved to Down House in Kent, where Darwin was to spend the rest of his
  • his greatest theoretical achievement, the most important of Darwins activities during the years
  • identifications of his bird and fossil mammal specimens, Darwin arrived at the daring and momentous
  • ideas on a wide range of topics. Then, in September 1838, T. R. Malthus’  An essay on the principle
  • in species. With this new theoretical point of departure Darwin continued to make notes and explore
  • by all the leading geologists of Englandamong them Charles Lyell, Sedgwick, and Buckland (see the
  • of South America”, Darwin continued to defend his and Lyells theory that floating icerather than
  • Fossil Mammalia , by Richard OwenMammalia , by G. R. WaterhouseBirds , by John Gould;  …
  • publications. The beetles were described by F. W. Hope, G. R. Waterhouse, and C. C. Babington; the
  • lists of Darwins plants (see D. M. Porter 1981). Charles Lyell In the extensive
  • correspondent, both scientifically and personally, was Charles Lyell. The letters Darwin and Lyell
  • had declared himself to be azealous discipleof Lyell, but his theory of coral reef formation, …
  • Their correspondence began in 1836 and from the start Lyell accepted Darwin on equal terms as a
  • material for her  Life, letters and journals of Sir Charles Lyell, Bart.,  Darwin informs her that
  • all crosses between all domestic birds & animals dogs, cats &c &c very valuable—' …
  • on literature in this field and on friends like Henslow, T. C. Eyton, and W. D. Fox, who were
  • the practice of systematists. As the correspondence with G. R. Waterhouse during the 1840s shows, …
  • same, though I know what I am looking for' ( Letter to G. R. Waterhouse, [26 July 1843] ).  …
  • In 1840 the illness was different. As he wrote to Charles Lyell, [19 February 1840] , “it is now
  • … [20 February 1840] , ‘as usual has been my enemybut D r . Holland tells me he thinks it is only

Darwin in letters, 1874: A turbulent year

Summary

The year 1874 was one of consolidation, reflection, and turmoil for Darwin. He spent the early months working on second editions of Coral reefs and Descent of man; the rest of the year was mostly devoted to further research on insectivorous plants. A…

Matches: 19 hits

  • 1874 was one of consolidation, reflection, and turmoil for Darwin. He spent the early months working
  • dispute over an anonymous review that attacked the work of Darwins son George dominated the second
  • and traveller Alexander von Humboldts 105th birthday, Darwin obliged with a reflection on his debt
  • during prolonged intervals’ ( letter to D. T. Gardner, [ c . 27 August 1874] ). The death of a
  • from W. D. Fox, 8 May [1874] ).  Such reminiscences led Darwin to the self-assessment, ‘as for one
  • I feel very old & helpless The year started for Darwin with a weeks visit to
  • at Erasmuss house. The event was led by the medium Charles E. Williams, and was attended by George
  • friend Joseph Dalton Hooker, and finally borrowed one from Charles Lyell ( letter to Smith, Elder
  • Descent  was published in November 1874 ( letter from R. F. Cooke, 12 November 1874 ). Though
  • at a much reduced price of nine shillings, in line with Charles Lyells  Students elements of
  • on subsequent print runs would be very good ( letter from R. F. Cooke, 12 November 1874 ). …
  • in a few hours dissolve the hardest cartilage, bone & meat &c. &c.’ ( letter to W. D. …
  • whether at theclose of the putrefaction of flesh, skin &c, any substance is produced before
  • details of an Australian variety of sundew ( letter from T. C. Copland, 23 June 1874 ). …
  • raising £860 ( Circular to John Lubbock, P. L. Sclater, Charles Lyell, W. B. Carpenter, and Michael
  • Sharpe for promotion at the British Museum ( letter to R. B. Sharpe, 24 November [1874] ).  He
  • head that M r  Spencers terms of equilibration &c always bother me & make everything less
  • of the English editions. Darwins French publisher, Charles Reinwald, engaged new translators to
  • of both Huxleys and Tyndalls addresses, Charles Lyell, who had spent his career distancing geology

Darwin in letters, 1865: Delays and disappointments

Summary

The year was marked by three deaths of personal significance to Darwin: Hugh Falconer, a friend and supporter; Robert FitzRoy, captain of the Beagle; and William Jackson Hooker, director of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, and father of Darwin’s friend…

Matches: 22 hits

  • In 1865, the chief work on Charles Darwins mind was the writing of  The variation of animals and
  • letters on climbing plants to make another paper. Darwin also submitted a manuscript of his
  • protégé, John Scott, who was now working in India. Darwins transmutation theory continued to
  • Argyll, appeared in the religious weeklyGood Words . Darwin received news of an exchange of
  • Butler, and, according to Butler, the bishop of Wellington. Darwins theory was discussed at an
  • in the  GardenersChronicleAt the end of the year, Darwin was elected an honorary member of
  • year was marked by three deaths of personal significance to Darwin: Hugh Falconer, a friend of
  • dispute between two of Darwins friends, John Lubbock and Charles Lyell . These events all inspired
  • claimed, important for his enjoyment of life. He wrote to Charles Lyell on 22 January [1865] , …
  • Darwin had received a copy of Müllers bookFür Darwin , a study of the Crustacea with reference
  • … … inheritance, reversion, effects of use & disuse &c’, and which he intended to publish in
  • and those of Georges Louis Leclerc, comte de Buffon, and Charles Bonnet; Darwin wrote back: ‘I do
  • the Royal Society of Edinburgh criticising Origin . Like Charles Lyell, who wrote to Darwin on
  • for existence (ibid., pp. 27681). Darwin responded to Lyells account in some detail ( see letter
  • the correspondence. At the end of May, the dispute between Charles Lyell and John Lubbock over
  • human antiquity, adding a note to his preface asserting that Lyell in his  Antiquity of man , …
  • Natural History Review . He also cited a statement by Lyell in  Antiquity of man  that the pages
  • He wrote to Hooker, ‘I doubt whether you or I or any one c d  do any good in healing this breach. …
  • Hookers behalf, ‘He asks if you saw the article of M r . Croll in the last Reader on the
  • set up to support FitzRoys children ( see letter from Charles Shaw, 3 October 1865 ). …
  • … ‘As for your thinking that you do not deserve the C[opley] Medal,’ he rebuked Hooker, ‘that I
  • are letters commenting on Origin , including two from Charles Lyell, who had been sent the proof

Controversy

Summary

The best-known controversies over Darwinian theory took place in public or in printed reviews. Many of these were highly polemical, presenting an over-simplified picture of the disputes. Letters, however, show that the responses to Darwin were extremely…

Matches: 13 hits

  • … the disputes. Letters, however, show that the responses to Darwin were extremely variable. Many of …
  • … was itself an important arena of debate, one that Darwin greatly preferred to the public sphere. …
  • … and support sustained in spite of enduring differences. Darwin's correspondence can thus help …
  • … Disagreement and Respect Darwin rarely engaged with critics publically. Letters exchanged …
  • … Richard Owen, the eminent comparative anatomist, show how Darwin tried to manage strong disagreement …
  • Darwin and Sedgwick Letter 2525 — Darwin, C. R. to Sedgwick, Adam, 11 Nov 1859 …
  • … Letter 2548 — Sedgwick, Adam to Darwin, C. R., 24 Nov 1859 Adam Sedgwick thanks Darwin for …
  • … as “heterodox”. Letter 2575 — Darwin, C. R. to Lyell, Charles, [10 Dec 1859] …
  • Darwin and his close friends, Joseph Dalton Hooker and Charles Lyell, show that Darwin, who had …
  • … at the Linnean Society of London, and presided over by Lyell and Hooker, reveals much about the …
  • … differences. Letter 2285 — Darwin, C. R. to Lyell, Charles, 18 [June 1858] Darwin …
  • … it to journal. Letter 2294 — Darwin, C. R. to Lyell, Charles, [25 June 1858] …
  • … to him. Letter 2295 — Darwin, C. R. to Lyell, Charles, 26 [June 1858] Darwin …

Dates of composition of Darwin's manuscript on species

Summary

Many of the dates of letters in 1856 and 1857 were based on or confirmed by reference to Darwin’s manuscript on species (DAR 8--15.1, inclusive; transcribed and published as Natural selection). This manuscript, begun in May 1856, was nearly completed by…

Matches: 6 hits

  • in 1856 and 1857 were based on or confirmed by reference to Darwins manuscript on species (DAR 8- …
  • May 1856, was nearly completed by June 1858. At that point Darwin wasinterrupted’, as he put it, …
  • summary of Wallaces theory of transmutation ( letter to Charles Lyell, 18 [June 1858] ). Darwin
  • in theJournaland the chapter headings as supplied by Darwin, followed by the reference of the
  • also given. Chapter 1 is not extant nor was it recorded in Darwin'sJournal’. Chapter 2 is not
  • chapter has been taken from a table of contents to which Darwin added the names of chapters as he

Darwin in letters,1870: Human evolution

Summary

The year 1870 is aptly summarised by the brief entry Darwin made in his journal: ‘The whole of the year at work on the Descent of Man & Selection in relation to Sex’.  Descent was the culmination of over three decades of observations and reflections on…

Matches: 21 hits

  • The year 1870 is aptly summarised by the brief entry Darwin made in his journal: ‘The whole of the
  • in relation to Sex’. Always precise in his accounting, Darwin reckoned that he had started writing
  • gathered on each of these topics was far more extensive than Darwin had anticipated. As a result,  …
  • and St George Jackson Mivart, and heated debates sparked by Darwins proposed election to the French
  • proofs of  Descent  in December, he wrote to his friend Charles Lyell, ‘thank all the powers above
  • … ( letter to Albert Günther, 13 January [1870] ). Darwin was still working hard on parts of the
  • style, the more grateful I shall be’  ( letter to H. E. Darwin, [8 February 1870] ). She had
  • … , the latter when she was just eighteen years of age. Darwin clearly expected her to make a
  • have thought that I shd. turn parson?’ ( letter to H. E. Darwin, [8 February 1870] ). Henrietta
  • so unimportant as the mind of man!’ ( letter from H. E. Darwin, [after 8 February 1870] ). …
  • philanthropist Frances Power Cobbe. At Cobbes suggestion, Darwin read some of Immanuel Kants  …
  • … ( letter to F. P. Cobbe, 23 March [1870?] ). Cobbe accused Darwin of smiling in his beard with
  • as animals: ears Despite Cobbes plea, most of Darwins scientific attention in 1870 was
  • fairy in Shakespeares  A midsummer nights dreamDarwin obtained a sketch of a human ear from
  • of a pointed tip projecting inward from the folded margin. Darwin, who had posed for the sculptor in
  • this volume, letter to Thomas Woolner, 10 March [1870] ). Darwin included Woolners sketch in  …
  • muscles A more troubling anatomical feature for Darwin was the platysma myoides, a band of
  • of fright’, and one of his photographs, later used by Darwin in  Expression , showed a man whose
  • who sent a sketch of a babys brows ( letter from L. C. Wedgwood, [5 May 1870] ). He also wrote to
  • … (in retrograde direction) naturalist’ (letter to A. R.Wallace, 26 January [1870]). …
  • in Paris. Quatrefages had just completed a bookCharles Darwin et ses précurseurs français  …

Darwin in letters,1866: Survival of the fittest

Summary

The year 1866 began well for Charles Darwin, as his health, after several years of illness, was now considerably improved. In February, Darwin received a request from his publisher, John Murray, for a new edition of  Origin. Darwin got the fourth…

Matches: 17 hits

  • The year 1866 began well for Charles Darwin, as his health, after several years of illness, was now
  • and also a meeting with Herbert Spencer, who was visiting Darwins neighbour, Sir John Lubbock. In
  • all but the concluding chapter of the work was submitted by Darwin to his publisher in December. …
  • in correspondence throughout the year, as in his remark to Lyell, ‘I quite follow you in thinking
  • in this volume), drawing Darwin, Hooker, and the botanist Charles James Fox Bunbury into the
  • … [28 February 1866] ). Darwin also ventured to inform Lyell that he did not support Lyells theory
  • you go on, after the startling apparition of your face at R.S. Soirèewhich I dreamed of 2 nights
  • so you are in for it’ ( letter from H. E. Darwin, [  c . 10 May 1866] ). Henriettas
  • teleological development ( see for example, letter to C. W. Nägeli, 12 June [1866] ). Also in
  • common broom ( Cytisus scoparius ) and the white broom ( C. multiflorus ) in his botanical
  • and June on the subject of  Rhamnus catharticus  (now  R. cathartica ). Darwin had become
  • of separate sexes. William gathered numerous specimens of  R. catharticus , the only species of  …
  • good, & we have been at it many a long year’ ( letter to Charles Lyell, 15 February [1866] ). …
  • replied with a modified list, adding Fritz Müllers  Für Darwin , and a recent fossil discovery in
  • selection, and with special creation ( letter from W. R. Grove, 31 August 1866 ). Hooker later
  • indeed at poor Susans loneliness’ ( letter from E. C. Langton to Emma and Charles Darwin, [6 and 7
  • borne it better than we c d  have hoped’ ( letter to Charles Lyell, 7 February [1866] ). Susan

The "wicked book": Origin at 157

Summary

Origin is 157 years old.  (Probably) the most famous book in science was published on 24 November 1859.  To celebrate we have uploaded hundreds of new images of letters, bringing the total number you can look at here to over 9000 representing more than…

Matches: 11 hits

  • book appeared.   You can now see examples of letters to Darwin from nearly 250 different people, and
  • Russel Wallace , co-discoverer of natural selection; Charles Lyell , and Joseph Hooker , the
  • Asa Gray who was an important sounding board for Darwins emerging ideas, and Thomas Huxley
  • scrap from 1857 comparing his views on species to DarwinsOthers, like Hugh Falconer , …
  • the less well-known scientific collaborators who became Darwin's correspondents, Mary Treat
  • letters from family and friends, including letters between Charles and his wife Emma, and several of
  • was co-opted as an observer in