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The writing of "Origin"

Summary

From a quiet rural existence at Down in Kent, filled with steady work on his ‘big book’ on the transmutation of species, Darwin was jolted into action in 1858 by the arrival of an unexpected letter (no longer extant) from Alfred Russel Wallace outlining a…

Matches: 22 hits

  • When I was in spirits I sometimes fancied that my book w d  be successful; but I never even built
  • not mean the sale, but the impression it has made on you…& Hooker & Huxley. The whole has
  • the load of curious facts on record.—’ (letter to W. D. Fox, 31 January [1858] ). In addition to
  • the interpretation of the statistics was still problematic. Hooker thought that Darwin was wrong to
  • up. With some trepidation, Darwin sent his manuscript off to Hooker for his comments. Darwins
  • that all was much alike, & if you condemned that you w  d . condemn allmy lifes work—& …
  • … ‘Your words have come true with a vengeance that I sh  d . be forestalled’, he lamented to Lyell. …
  • time away. On 16 May [1858] , he arranged a meeting with Hooker to discuss his manuscript on
  • severe.—’ On 18 [May 1858] , he again tells Hooker: ‘There is not least hurry in world about my M
  • work. The story has often been told of how Lyell and Hooker suggested that Darwins years of
  • 1857. The correspondence between Darwin, Lyell, and Hooker in this volume contains all of the extant
  • 1858. It also includes an unpublished letter from Wallace to Hooker thanking him and Lyell for
  • his material would require asmall volume’ (letter to J. D. Hooker, 12 October [1858] ). Begun
  • the writing of thisabstractcontinued until March 1859; the resulting volume was published in
  • instinct the previous March. By the middle of March 1859, Darwin had finished the last
  • upon Lyell for advice (letter to Charles Lyell, 28 March [1859] ). Lyell suggested the firm of
  • plan of his book (see letter from Elwin to Murray, 3 May 1859 , and letter to John Murray, 6
  • to Fox, ‘& I feel worse than when I came’ (letter to W. D. Fox, [16 November 1859] ). It was
  • about the fine points of Darwins theory (see letter to J. D. Hooker, 6 May 1859 ). Among the
  • the Priests at me & leaves me to their mercies’ (letter to J. D. Hooker, [22 November 1859] ) …
  • a sort of instinct to try to make out truth’ (letter to W. D. Fox, 24 [March 1859] ). Yet he
  • all young & rising naturalists on our side.—’ (letter to J. D. Hooker, 14 December [1859] ). …

Darwin in letters, 1858-1859: Origin

Summary

The years 1858 and 1859 were, without doubt, the most momentous of Darwin’s life. From a quiet rural existence filled with steady work on his ‘big book’ on species, he was jolted into action by the arrival of an unexpected letter from Alfred Russel Wallace…

Matches: 21 hits

  • The years 1858 and 1859 were, without doubt, the most momentous of Darwins life. From a quiet
  • and prompted the composition and publication, in November 1859, of Darwins major treatise  On the
  • …  exceeded my wildest hopes By the end of 1859, Darwins work was being discussed in
  • his views of close friends like Charles Lyell, Joseph Dalton Hooker, and Thomas Henry Huxley, who
  • … ‘When I was in spirits’, he told Lyell at the end of 1859, ‘I sometimes fancied that my book w  d
  • made on you (whom I have always looked at as chief judge) & Hooker & Huxley. The whole has  …
  • the load of curious facts on record.—’ ( letter to W. D. Fox, 31 January [1858] ). In addition to
  • the interpretation of the statistics was still problematic. Hooker thought that Darwin was wrong to
  • up. With some trepidation, Darwin sent his manuscript off to Hooker for his comments. Darwins
  • that all was much alike, & if you condemned that you w d . condemn allmy lifes work—& …
  • … ‘Your words have come true with a vengeance that I sh  d . be forestalled’, he lamented to Lyell. …
  • some time away. On 16 May [1858], he arranged a meeting with Hooker to discuss his manuscript on
  • be dreadfully severe.—’ On 18 [May 1858], he again tells Hooker: ‘There is not least hurry in world
  • work. The story has often been told of how Lyell and Hooker suggested that Darwins years of
  • 1857. The correspondence between Darwin, Lyell, and Hooker contains all of the extant letters
  • his material would require asmall volume’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 12 October [1858] ). Begun
  • appropriated the others ideas (see letters to J. D. Hooker, 2 March [1859] , 11 March [1859] …
  • Fox, ‘& I feel worse than when I came’ ( letter to W. D. Fox, [16 November 1859] ). It was
  • about the fine points of Darwins theory ( see letter to J. D. Hooker, 6 May 1859 ). Among the
  • Priests at me & leaves me to their mercies’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [22 November 1859] ). …
  • young & rising naturalists on our side.—’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 14 December [1859] ). …

Darwin in letters, 1865: Delays and disappointments

Summary

The year was marked by three deaths of personal significance to Darwin: Hugh Falconer, a friend and supporter; Robert FitzRoy, captain of the Beagle; and William Jackson Hooker, director of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, and father of Darwin’s friend…

Matches: 13 hits

  • for evaluation, and persuaded his friend Joseph Dalton Hooker to comment on a paper on  Verbascum
  • committed suicide at the end of April; and William Jackson Hooker, director of the Royal Botanic
  • thriving, and when illness made work impossible, Darwin and Hooker read a number of novels, and
  • the Boys at home: they make the house jolly’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 7 January [1865] ). Darwin
  • kind friend to me. So the world goes.—’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 2 February [1865] ). However, …
  • griefs & pains: these alone are unalloyed’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 3 February 1865 ). …
  • Sic transit gloria mundi, with a vengeance’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 9 February [1865] ). …
  • know it is folly & nonsense to try anyone’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 7 January [1865] ). He
  • and Darwin had given it up by early July ( see letter to J. D. Hooker, [10 July 1865] ). In
  • … ‘able to write about an hour on most days’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 22 December [1865] ). …
  • willing to bear the expense of the woodcuts ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 7 January [1865] ). After
  • loathe the whole subject like tartar emetic’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 19 January [1865] ). …
  • been sent the proof-sheets before publication. Letters after 1859 throw light on Darwins continuing

Controversy

Summary

The best-known controversies over Darwinian theory took place in public or in printed reviews. Many of these were highly polemical, presenting an over-simplified picture of the disputes. Letters, however, show that the responses to Darwin were extremely…

Matches: 7 hits

  • … Letter 2525 — Darwin, C. R. to Sedgwick, Adam, 11 Nov 1859 Darwin writes to Sedgwick to tell …
  • … Letter 2548 — Sedgwick, Adam to Darwin, C. R., 24 Nov 1859 Adam Sedgwick thanks Darwin for …
  • … Letter 2555 — Darwin, C. R. to Sedgwick, Adam, 26 Nov [1859] Darwin says Sedgwick could not …
  • … Letter 2526 — Owen, Richard to Darwin, C. R., 12 Nov 1859 Owen says to Darwin he will welcome …
  • … Letter 2575 — Darwin, C. R. to Lyell, Charles, [10 Dec 1859] Darwin discusses with King' …
  • … Letter 2580 — Darwin, C. R. to Owen, Richard, 13 Dec [1859] Darwin responds to Owen’s remarks …
  • … between Darwin and his close friends, Joseph Dalton Hooker and Charles Lyell, show that Darwin, who …

Darwin in letters, 1863: Quarrels at home, honours abroad

Summary

At the start of 1863, Charles Darwin was actively working on the manuscript of The variation of animals and plants under domestication, anticipating with excitement the construction of a hothouse to accommodate his increasingly varied botanical experiments…

Matches: 6 hits

  • … ‘some Quadrumanum animal’, as he put it in a letter to J. D. Hooker of 24[–5] February [1863] . …
  • … (p. 488). Since the publication of  Origin  in 1859, new evidence that early humans had coexisted …
  • … the origin of species particularly, worried Darwin; he told Hooker that he had once thought Lyell …
  • … lack of expertise in the subject. ‘The worst of it is’, Hooker wrote to Darwin, ‘I suppose it is …
  • … credit to his own research and that of Joseph Prestwich. Hooker wrote: ‘I fear L. will get scant …
  • … had contributed to the proofs of human antiquity. Darwin and Hooker repeatedly exchanged regrets …

Dramatisation script

Summary

Re: Design – Adaptation of the Correspondence of Charles Darwin, Asa Gray and others… by Craig Baxter – as performed 25 March 2007

Matches: 21 hits

  • writings of Asa Gray, Charles Darwin, Joseph Dalton Hooker, Jane Loring Gray Louis Agassiz, Adam
  • this actor uses the words of Jane Loring Gray, Joseph Dalton Hooker, Hugh Falconer, Louis Agassiz, …
  • of natural selection to his friend, the botanist, Joseph D Hooker GRAY:   3   Charles
  • year 1839, and copied and communicated to Messrs Lyell and Hooker in 1844, being a part of
  • DARWIN:   7   January 1844. My dear Hooker. I have beenengaged in a very presumptuous work
  • the opportunity I enjoyed of making your acquaintance at Hookers three years ago; and besides that
  • sheet of note-paper! DARWIN11   My dear HookerWhat a remarkably nice and kind
  • 22   Hurrah I got yesterday my 41st Grass! Hooker is younger than Darwin and Gray by
  • species beforeDARWIN24   My dear Hookeryou cannot imagine how pleased I am
  • on your bowels of immutability. Darwin passes to Hooker a brace of letters 25
  • there is a little rap for you. GRAY:   26   Hooker [is] dreadfully paradoxical to
  • as well as any man. I send itDarwin passes to Hooker an envelope of seeds. …
  • and Hawks have often been seen in mid Atlantic. HOOKER:   28   Thanks for your letter
  • pleased to have. DARWIN33   My dear Hooker. Thanks, also, for [your] Photograph, …
  • expression and so by no means does you justice. HOOKER:   34   I believe I have very
  • beguiled into shouldrileyou, as you say it doesHooker rightly tells me, I have no business to
  • make a very audacious remark in opposition to what I imagine Hooker has been writing and to your own
  • to tell you, that before I had ever corresponded with you, Hooker had shown me several of your
  • should not be in conflict. A TREMENDOUS FURORE: 1859-1860 In which Darwin distributes
  • 12 OCTOBER 1857 60 A GRAY TO JD HOOKER, SUMMER 1859 61 A GRAY TO JD HOOKER, …
  • C DARWIN, 1819 AUGUST 1862 149 C DARWIN TO J. D. HOOKER 26 JULY 1863 150

Darwin in letters, 1862: A multiplicity of experiments

Summary

1862 was a particularly productive year for Darwin. This was not only the case in his published output (two botanical papers and a book on the pollination mechanisms of orchids), but more particularly in the extent and breadth of the botanical experiments…

Matches: 2 hits

  • … to be referred to routinely. In November, Joseph Dalton Hooker told him: ‘you are alluded to in no …
  • … students to make observations on American species. Hooker and George Bentham at Kew were also …

The Lyell–Lubbock dispute

Summary

In May 1865 a dispute arose between John Lubbock and Charles Lyell when Lubbock, in his book Prehistoric times, accused Lyell of plagiarism. The dispute caused great dismay among many of their mutual scientific friends, some of whom took immediate action…

Matches: 15 hits

  • but his views were generally derided. 1  In 1859, Lyell visited several sites in
  • that these were indeed implements of early humans (C. Lyell 1859). In September 1860 he visited
  • in French, earlier reports written in Danish (Morlot 1859, Forchhammer et al. 18515); Lubbock
  • discussed the book in correspondence with Joseph Dalton Hooker, Asa Gray, and Huxley but he never
  • complaint about the book was more personal. He confided to Hooker that he wasdeeply disappointed’ …
  • but had tried, indirectly, to influence him. He told Hooker: 10 Do see Falconer
  • Falconer to tone down his attack on Lyell and agreed, on Hookers advice, to soften a passage in the
  • allude to Sir Cs explanation of the matter’. 23 Hooker, who had also been sent copies of the
  • have given Lyells explanation in print, he disagreed with Hookers assessment of Lubbocks note, …
  • reiterated his admiration for Lubbocks book ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [4 June 1865] ). A week
  • When Hooker pressed him for an opinion ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 13 July 1865 ), Darwin wrote
  • of Antiquity of man (C. Lyell 1863c; see letter from J. D. Hooker, [15 June 1865] and n. 13) …
  • 7. See Correspondence vol. 11, letter to J. D. Hooker, 24[–5] February [1863] . On Lyells
  • … ]. 10. Correspondence vol. 11, letter to J. D. Hooker, 17 March [1863] . …
  • have seen is milk & water’ (see enclosure to letter from J. D. Hooker, [15 June 1865] ). …

Darwin and Fatherhood

Summary

Charles Darwin married Emma Wedgwood in 1839 and over the next seventeen years the couple had ten children. It is often assumed that Darwin was an exceptional Victorian father. But how extraordinary was he? The Correspondence Project allows an unusually…

Matches: 4 hits

  • … else is transmitted by inheritance.’  (Darwin to W. D. Fox,  23 September [1859] ). He believed …
  • … period, as Darwin’s attempts to comfort his friend Joseph Hooker on the death of his six-year-old …
  • … and especially billiards were favourite family games, and in 1859 he ended a letter to his oldest …
  • … game of Billiards’. (Darwin to his son William,  7 July [1859] ). Whole family outings were …

Darwin in letters,1866: Survival of the fittest

Summary

The year 1866 began well for Charles Darwin, as his health, after several years of illness, was now considerably improved. In February, Darwin received a request from his publisher, John Murray, for a new edition of  Origin. Darwin got the fourth…

Matches: 18 hits

  • on publishers, decried on one occasion by Joseph Dalton Hooker asPenny-wise Pound foolish, …
  • Fuller consideration of Darwins work was given by Hooker in an evening speech on insular floras at
  • me any harmany how I cant be idle’ ( letter to W. D. Fox, 24 August [1866] ). Towards
  • continued to refine his hypothesis in 1866. He wrote to Hooker on 16 May [1866] , ‘Iam at work
  • it was too big. ‘You must congratulate me’, he wrote to Hooker, ‘when you hear that I have sent M.S. …
  • Animals & Cult. Plantsto Printers’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 24 December [1866] ). When
  • of Darwins closest scientific friends and correspondents. Hookers research on alpine floras, Henry
  • have survived and appear in this volume), drawing Darwin, Hooker, and the botanist Charles James Fox
  • bigotted to the last inch, & will not yield’, he wrote to Hooker, who attached greater weight to
  • more than the belief of a dozen physicists’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [28 February 1866] ). Darwin
  • … ‘Your fatherentered at the same time with Dr B. J. who received him with triumph. All his friends
  • me to worship Bence Jones in future—’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 13 May 1866 ). Darwin himself
  • then went for ¾ to Zoolog. Garden!!!!!!!!!’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [28 April 1866] ). …
  • tell him the truth how little exertion I can stand. I sh d  like very much to see him, though I
  • original contract between Darwin and the New York publisher D. Appleton and Co. in 1860. …
  • … & admit how little is known on the subject’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 3 and 4 August [1866] ). …
  • see how differently we look at every thing’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 5 August [1866] ). Yet both
  • same thing in a different light from you’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 7 August 1866 ). The two

Women as a scientific audience

Summary

Target audience? | Female readership | Reading Variation Darwin's letters, in particular those exchanged with his editors and publisher, reveal a lot about his intended audience. Regardless of whether or not women were deliberately targeted as a…

Matches: 10 hits

  • Letter 2447 - Darwin to Murray, J., [5 April 1859] Darwin sends a manuscript copy of
  • of style. Letter 2461 - Darwin to Hooker, J. D., [11 May 1859] Darwin
  • tone and style. Letter 7329 - Murray , J. to Darwin, [28 September 1870] …
  • Letter 7331 - Darwin to Murray, J., [29 September 1870] Darwin asks Murray to
  • to women. Letter 8611 - Cupples, A. J. to Darwin, E., [8 November 1872] …
  • … - Barnard, A. to Darwin, [30 March 1871] J. S. Henslows daughter, Anne, responds to
  • with her father. Letter 7651 - Wedgwood, F. J. to Darwin, H. E., [1 April 1871] …
  • be suitable. Letter 7411 - Pfeiffer, E. J. to Darwin, [before 26 April 1871] …
  • patience and care. Letter 6110 - Samuelson, J. to Darwin, [10 April 1868] …
  • is a revelation. Letter 9633 - Nevill, D. F. to Darwin, [11 September 1874] …

Darwin in letters, 1868: Studying sex

Summary

The quantity of Darwin’s correspondence increased dramatically in 1868 due largely to his ever-widening research on human evolution and sexual selection.Darwin’s theory of sexual selection as applied to human descent led him to investigate aspects of the…

Matches: 20 hits

  • the accursed Index-maker’, Darwin wrote to Joseph Dalton Hooker on 6 January . Darwin had sent
  • … ). Darwin sympathised, replying on 14 January , ‘I sh d  have a very bad heart, as hard as
  • to read a few pages feel fairly nauseated’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 3 February [1868] ). But such
  • awaythat sparked the most discussion. Darwin wrote to Hooker on 23 February , ‘did you look at
  • thought it was by Gray himself, but Darwin corrected him: ‘D r  Gray would strike me in the face, …
  • editor of the  London and Westminster Review . When Hooker later tried to refute the claims of the
  • a scamp & I begin to think a veritable ass’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 1 September [1868] ). …
  • on 17 April 1868 . The letter was addressed tothe Rev d  C. Darwin M.d’; Binstead evidently
  • … (from ?, 6 April 1868). On 21 May , Darwin complained to Hooker, ‘I am bothered with heaps of
  • kind almost heroic, in you to sacrifice your hair and pay 3 d  in the cause of science
  • information on colour changes in the canary (letters from J. J. Weir, [26] March 1868 and 3
  • … , ‘almost heroic, in you to sacrifice your hair and pay 3 d  in the cause of science.’ Darwin
  • added, ‘for it is clear that I have none’ ( letter to J. J. Weir, 30 May [1868] ). Sexual
  • as ofvictorious males getting wives’ ( letter to W. D. Fox, 25 February [1868] ). Yet a
  • role of colour, sound, and smell in attracting females. J. J. Weir reported on 14 April 1868
  • Wallace that he had begun the previous year, writing to Hooker on 21 May , ‘I always distrust
  • the direct result of natural selection ( Variation  2: 185–9). Wallace seized upon this point in a
  • circulated to remote parts of the world. A correspondent of Hookers distributed it in Japan ( …
  • the Linnean Society of London on 19 March. In a letter to Hooker on 21 May , he enthused over an
  • the previous year by James Philip Mansel Weale ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [20 May 1868] ). …

Darwin in letters, 1874: A turbulent year

Summary

The year 1874 was one of consolidation, reflection, and turmoil for Darwin. He spent the early months working on second editions of Coral reefs and Descent of man; the rest of the year was mostly devoted to further research on insectivorous plants. A…

Matches: 16 hits

  • by observation during prolonged intervals’ ( letter to D. T. Gardner, [ c . 27 August 1874] ). …
  • of shooting and collecting beetles ( letter from W. D. Fox, 8 May [1874] ).  Such reminiscences
  • looks backwards much more than forwards’ ( letter to W. D. Fox, 11 May [1874] ). I
  • hope.— I feel very old & helpless’  ( letter to B. J. Sulivan, 6 January [1874] ). Darwin
  • to believe in such rubbish’, he confided to Joseph Dalton Hooker ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 18
  • the publishers, he applied first to his friend Joseph Dalton Hooker, and finally borrowed one from
  • for misinterpreting Darwin on this point ( letter from J. D. Dana, 21 July 1874 ); however, he did
  • … ‘Im a grown man now’, he reminded Darwin, ‘& sh d . stand on my own footing, & if it is
  • Mivart (see  Correspondence  vol. 20, letter to St G. J. Mivart, 11 January [1872] ). To Darwin
  • views. In December, he sought advice from Huxley and Hooker, sending them a draft letter that
  • Mivart had written the article ( enclosure to letter from J. D. Hooker, 21 December 1874 ). Huxley
  • to write to Mivart directly after he knew the full result of Hookers and Huxleys representations ( …
  • or adviseable’. On Christmas Eve, Darwin wrote to Hooker that they were still in a dilemma
  • 15 th  he published that shabby rejoinder’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 24 December [1874] ).  On
  • made public through anonymous reviews. While staying with Hooker over Christmas, John Tyndall, …
  • removed as secretary of the Linnean Society  ( letter From J. D. Hooker, 29 December 1874 ). …

Origin

Summary

Darwin’s most famous work, Origin, had an inauspicious beginning. It grew out of his wish to establish priority for the species theory he had spent over twenty years researching. Darwin never intended to write Origin, and had resisted suggestions in 1856…

Matches: 22 hits

  • in the Linnean Societys journal , Joseph Dalton Hooker urged Darwin to prepare a longer abstract
  • length to just 30 pages of the Linnean Journal . In reply, Hooker provided reassurance by
  • supplemental numberof the journalBy this point, Hooker had also read the draft section of the
  • exact theory; & asking me to show it to Lyell. The latter & Hooker have taken on themselves
  • Abstract & I find it amusing & improving workhe told Hooker. ‘I hated the thought of the
  • also heard from John Stevens Henslow, his old mentor and Hookers father-in-law, who clearly had
  • … ‘I will try not to be too diffusivehe assured Hooker, ‘ I fear it will spoil all interest in my
  • you have done me in making me make this abstract’, he told Hooker, ’ for though I thought I had got
  • he actively sought criticism from trusted readers like Hooker, Lyell, and Thomas Henry Huxley. He
  • … & even contemptthat he momentarily forgot that Hooker was theone living soulwho was
  • that hisspeculations were ajam pot ”’ to HookerIndeed, when Hooker was writing his essay on
  • Chapter on transmigration of forms across tropics ’. When Hookers essay was published in 1859, it
  • will end by being perverted .’ The effect of Darwin of Hookers views were apparent when he
  • younger  men converts. My neighbour & excellent naturalist JLubbock is enthusiastic convert. …
  • Abstractwould not be finished until around April 1859. But this was an optimistic estimate. …
  • of favoured races” ’, he told Lyell. On 31 March 1859, Darwin wrote to Murray describing his work
  • on geographical distribution that Darwin had sent to Hooker for comments were accidentally placed in
  • the work of correcting proofs continued over the summer of 1859, Darwin had to take the water cure
  • never shirked a difficulty’, he told Lyell on 20 September 1859, ‘ I am foolishly anxious for your
  • of Science meeting held in Aberdeen from 14 to 21 September 1859. Darwin was confident that in time
  • partly by my Book & partly by their own reflexions, I sh d . feel that the subject was safe; …
  • of O rigin, which, he stated, ‘ if there be 2 d . Edit. I will attend to. ’ Darwin was

Darwin in letters, 1875: Pulling strings

Summary

‘I am getting sick of insectivorous plants’, Darwin confessed in January 1875. He had worked on the subject intermittently since 1859, and had been steadily engaged on a book manuscript for nine months; January also saw the conclusion of a bitter dispute…

Matches: 9 hits

  • … work of preparing new Editions’, he complained again to Hooker on 18 August. Finally, by …
  • … much more than insectivorous plants. As he confessed to Hooker on 12 December , ‘I have not felt …
  • … during the affair by the loyalty of his close friends, Hooker and Thomas Henry Huxley. …
  • … honoured George. You have indeed been a true friend.’ Hooker was hampered by his position as …
  • … & if he speaks to me should let him feel it .’ Hooker also directed some of his anger …
  • … thirst for vengeance is now quite Satisfied’, he told Hooker on 17 January , ‘I feel now like a …
  • … firm. Darwin was impressed by the device, remarking to Hooker on 13 October : ‘Horace has made a …
  • … to the Royal Society on his behalf. Darwin complained to Hooker on 13 October , ‘It is not at all …
  • … had reservations about the paper’s merit. He confessed to Hooker two days later, ‘after agonies of …

Darwin in letters, 1869: Forward on all fronts

Summary

At the start of 1869, Darwin was hard at work making changes and additions for a fifth edition of  Origin. He may have resented the interruption to his work on sexual selection and human evolution, but he spent forty-six days on the task. Much of the…

Matches: 15 hits

  • correcting’ ( Correspondence  vol. 16, letter to W. D. Fox, 12 December [1868] ). He may have
  • he remarked to his best friend, the botanist Joseph Dalton Hooker, ‘If I lived 20 more years, & …
  • Well it is a beginning, & that is something’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [22 January 1869] ). …
  • Darwin sent a manuscript of his response (now missing) to Hooker, remarking: ‘I should be extremely
  • blunders, as is very likely to be the case’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 13 January 1869 ). Hooker
  • principle (Nägeli 1865, pp. 289). In further letters, Hooker tried to provide Darwin with botanical
  • retrench that position following criticism from his friend Hooker, by admitting that the survival of
  • do fairly well, though if I had read you first, perhaps I d  have been less deferential towards
  • males & females, cocks & hens.—’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 13 November [1869] ). Yet
  • … & contemptalmost hatred—’ ( from Asa Gray and J. L. Gray, 8 and 9 May [1869] ). James
  • by Wallaces assertions: ‘If you had not told me I d  have thought that they had been added by
  • commentary (Royer trans. 1870). Darwin complained to Hooker, ‘Besides her enormously long & …
  • … [her] to translateDomestic Animals”’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 19 November [1869] ). Angered by
  • by Anglican clergymen in the biology section of the meeting. Hooker described the session with some
  • suggestions to its publisher, Macmillan ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 14 November 1869 ).  Darwin

Women’s scientific participation

Summary

Observers | Fieldwork | Experimentation | Editors and critics | Assistants Darwin’s correspondence helps bring to light a community of women who participated, often actively and routinely, in the nineteenth-century scientific community. Here is a…

Matches: 16 hits

  • in South Africa. Letter 6736 - Gray, A. & J. L to Darwin, [8 & 9 May 1869] …
  • of wormholes. Letter 8611 - Cupples, A. J. to Darwin, E., [8 November1872] …
  • Darwins behalf. Letter 8683 - Roberts, D. to Darwin, [17 December 1872] …
  • little treatise”. Letter 4436 - Darwin to Hooker, J. D., [26-27 March 1864] …
  • and orangs. Letter 5705 - Haast, J. F. J. von to Darwin, [4 December 1867] …
  • in a marble tablet”. Letter 6815 - Scott, J. to Darwin, [2 July 1869] John
  • Men: Letter 385  - Wedgwood, S. E. & J. to Darwin, [10 November 1837] …
  • at Maer Hall, Staffordshire. Letter 1219  - Hooker, J. D. to Darwin, [3 February
  • …  - Henslow, G. to Darwin, [11 November 1865] J. S. Henslows son, George, passes on the
  • Men: Letter 1836  - Berkeley, M. J. to Darwin, [7 March 1856] Clergyman and
  • The experiments were carried outat the suggestion of Dr Hookerand what little he has ascertained
  • Women: Letter 2345 - Darwin to Hooker, J. D., [20 October 1858] Darwin
  • Letter 2447 - Darwin to Murray, J., [5 April 1859] Darwin asks his publisher, John
  • of style. Letter 2461  - Darwin to Hooker, J. D., [11 May 1859] Darwin
  • as such”. Letter 2475  - Darwin to Hooker, J. D., [2 July 1859] Darwin
  • Letter 2501   - Lyell, C. to Darwin, [3 October 1859] Lyell offers praise and

Darwin in letters, 1860: Answering critics

Summary

On 7 January 1860, John Murray published the second edition of Darwin’s Origin of species, printing off another 3000 copies to satisfy the demands of an audience that surprised both the publisher and the author. It wasn't long, however, before ‘the…

Matches: 16 hits

  • Henry Huxley, William Benjamin Carpenter, and Joseph Dalton Hooker. Others were not quite as
  • cannot expect fairness in a Reviewer’, Darwin commented to Hooker after reading an early notice that
  • of the geological record; but this criticism, he told Hooker, did not at all concern his main
  • principles of scientific investigation.—’ ( letter to J. S. Henslow, 8 May [1860] ). Above
  • it comes in time to be admitted as real.’ ( letter to C. J. F. Bunbury, 9 February [1860] ). This
  • considered it more a failure than a success ( see letter to J. D. Hooker, 14 February [1860] ). …
  • two physiologists, and five botanists ( see letter to J. D. Hooker, 3 March [1860] ). Others, like
  • … ‘topics of the dayat the meeting in a letter from Hooker written from Oxford. Hookers letter, one
  • Owenhad a furious battle over Darwins absent body’, Hooker attended the fabled Saturday session of
  • of the development of Western civilisation. Wilberforce, Hooker recounted, responded by shouting
  • audience’. With his blood boiling and his heart pounding, Hooker threw down the gauntlet and became
  • … ‘master of the field after 4 hours battle’ (letter from J. D. Hooker, 2 July 1860). Other
  • were already proved) to his own views.—’ ( letter from J. S. Henslow to J. D. Hooker, 10 May 1860
  • these visits have led to changed structure.’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 27 April [1860] ). Tracing
  • months later, ‘just as at a game of chess.’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 19 [July 1860] ). With the
  • substance from non=nitrogenised substances.’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 31 [August 1860] ). Relying

Darwin in letters, 1871: An emptying nest

Summary

The year 1871 was an extremely busy and productive one for Darwin, with the publication in February of his long-awaited book on human evolution, Descent of man. The other main preoccupation of the year was the preparation of his manuscript on expression.…

Matches: 6 hits

  • … be well abused’, he wrote to his friend Joseph Dalton Hooker on 21 January , ‘for as my son Frank …
  • … the proof-sheets, rather than waiting for the bound copies. Hooker suggested one of the reasons …
  • … tell heavily against natural selection’, Darwin wrote to Hooker on 21 January . Darwin read the …
  • … arrogant, odious beast that ever lived,’ Darwin wrote to Hooker on 16 September . Darwin …
  • … laughing. crying grinning pouting &c. &c’, he wrote to Hooker on 21 March . Darwin …
  • … in June, and was married on 31 August. Darwin remarked to Hooker on 23 July , ‘her loss will be …

Darwin's in letters, 1873: Animal or vegetable?

Summary

Having laboured for nearly five years on human evolution, sexual selection, and the expression of emotions, Darwin was able to devote 1873 almost exclusively to his beloved plants. He resumed work on the digestive powers of sundews and Venus fly traps, and…

Matches: 4 hits

  • … a specimen of the carnivorous  Drosophyllum lusitanicum , Hooker wrote: “Pray work your wicked …
  • … at the end of November 1872 and sold quickly. He wrote to Hooker on 12 January [1873] , “Did I …
  • … ( letter from E. F. Lubbock, [before 7 April 1873] ). Hooker added: “I have beaten my brains to …
  • … to worry, however, that he would overwork himself, and so Hooker volunteered to accompany him on a …
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