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Darwin in letters, 1874: A turbulent year

Summary

The year 1874 was one of consolidation, reflection, and turmoil for Darwin. He spent the early months working on second editions of Coral reefs and Descent of man; the rest of the year was mostly devoted to further research on insectivorous plants. A…

Matches: 17 hits

  • by observation during prolonged intervals’ ( letter to D. T. Gardner, [ c . 27 August 1874] ). …
  • of shooting and collecting beetles ( letter from W. D. Fox, 8 May [1874] ).  Such reminiscences
  • looks backwards much more than forwards’ ( letter to W. D. Fox, 11 May [1874] ). I
  • hope.— I feel very old & helpless’  ( letter to B. J. Sulivan, 6 January [1874] ). Darwin
  • to believe in such rubbish’, he confided to Joseph Dalton Hooker ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 18
  • the publishers, he applied first to his friend Joseph Dalton Hooker, and finally borrowed one from
  • for misinterpreting Darwin on this point ( letter from J. D. Dana, 21 July 1874 ); however, he did
  • vol. 22, Appendix V and Dawson 2007, pp. 7781). Darwin first considered taking legal action over
  • … ‘Im a grown man now’, he reminded Darwin, ‘& sh d . stand on my own footing, & if it is
  • Mivart (see  Correspondence  vol. 20, letter to St G. J. Mivart, 11 January [1872] ). To Darwin
  • views. In December, he sought advice from Huxley and Hooker, sending them a draft letter that
  • Mivart had written the article ( enclosure to letter from J. D. Hooker, 21 December 1874 ). Huxley
  • to write to Mivart directly after he knew the full result of Hookers and Huxleys representations ( …
  • or adviseable’. On Christmas Eve, Darwin wrote to Hooker that they were still in a dilemma
  • 15 th  he published that shabby rejoinder’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 24 December [1874] ).  On
  • removed as secretary of the Linnean Society  ( letter From J. D. Hooker, 29 December 1874 ). …
  • much in Switzerland ( letter from Francis and Amy Darwin, 8 August [1874] ). Francis had

Darwin in letters, 1862: A multiplicity of experiments

Summary

1862 was a particularly productive year for Darwin. This was not only the case in his published output (two botanical papers and a book on the pollination mechanisms of orchids), but more particularly in the extent and breadth of the botanical experiments…

Matches: 4 hits

  • … to be referred to routinely. In November, Joseph Dalton Hooker told him: ‘you are alluded to in no …
  • … students to make observations on American species. Hooker and George Bentham at Kew were also …
  • … of almost every  flower’ ( letter to Daniel Oliver, 8 June [1862] ). I never before …
  • … Eastborne in the summer of 1860 (see Correspondence vol. 8), Darwin became ‘wonderfully interested’ …

Darwin in letters, 1863: Quarrels at home, honours abroad

Summary

At the start of 1863, Charles Darwin was actively working on the manuscript of The variation of animals and plants under domestication, anticipating with excitement the construction of a hothouse to accommodate his increasingly varied botanical experiments…

Matches: 6 hits

  • … ‘some Quadrumanum animal’, as he put it in a letter to J. D. Hooker of 24[–5] February [1863] . …
  • … far more than  Origin had (see  Correspondence  vol. 8, letter to Charles Lyell, 10 January …
  • … the origin of species particularly, worried Darwin; he told Hooker that he had once thought Lyell …
  • … lack of expertise in the subject. ‘The worst of it is’, Hooker wrote to Darwin, ‘I suppose it is …
  • … credit to his own research and that of Joseph Prestwich. Hooker wrote: ‘I fear L. will get scant …
  • … had contributed to the proofs of human antiquity. Darwin and Hooker repeatedly exchanged regrets …

Dramatisation script

Summary

Re: Design – Adaptation of the Correspondence of Charles Darwin, Asa Gray and others… by Craig Baxter – as performed 25 March 2007

Matches: 26 hits

  • writings of Asa Gray, Charles Darwin, Joseph Dalton Hooker, Jane Loring Gray Louis Agassiz, Adam
  • this actor uses the words of Jane Loring Gray, Joseph Dalton Hooker, Hugh Falconer, Louis Agassiz, …
  • of natural selection to his friend, the botanist, Joseph D Hooker GRAY:   3   Charles
  • exhausting. And I am actually forced always to go to bed at 8 oclock completely tired. …
  • year 1839, and copied and communicated to Messrs Lyell and Hooker in 1844, being a part of
  • DARWIN:   7   January 1844. My dear Hooker. I have beenengaged in a very presumptuous work
  • attention. He opens the letter. DARWIN8   April 25 th 1855. My dear [Dr Gray] …
  • the opportunity I enjoyed of making your acquaintance at Hookers three years ago; and besides that
  • sheet of note-paper! DARWIN11   My dear HookerWhat a remarkably nice and kind
  • 18   Some of my immersed seeds have come up after 82 and 85 days immersion, viz Radishes, Beet, …
  • 22   Hurrah I got yesterday my 41st Grass! Hooker is younger than Darwin and Gray by
  • species beforeDARWIN24   My dear Hookeryou cannot imagine how pleased I am
  • on your bowels of immutability. Darwin passes to Hooker a brace of letters 25
  • there is a little rap for you. GRAY:   26   Hooker [is] dreadfully paradoxical to
  • as well as any man. I send itDarwin passes to Hooker an envelope of seeds. …
  • and Hawks have often been seen in mid Atlantic. HOOKER:   28   Thanks for your letter
  • Darwin chuckles at this imagery. GRAY:   80   Surely, Mr. Darwins theory is none
  • in the long-run alone survive. DARWIN82   I can now very plainly seethat I
  • it not been for four or five men, including yourself83 The effect on me is that I will
  • exhilarated from the fight. HOOKER:   84   My dear Gray. We have had an awful fight
  • of the elements of ScienceGRAY:   85   I should have liked to bandy words a little
  • amid rounds of applause for my side. GRAY:   86   A minister out in Illinois has
  • that ought to prevail among scientific men. 87   [Here, in the US,] I said that Darwin
  • … – is suffering from the strain. DARWIN:   88   I have read lately so many hostile
  • Gray makes a public statement. GRAY:   89   Organic Nature abounds with
  • C DARWIN, 1819 AUGUST 1862 149 C DARWIN TO J. D. HOOKER 26 JULY 1863 150

Darwin in letters,1870: Human evolution

Summary

The year 1870 is aptly summarised by the brief entry Darwin made in his journal: ‘The whole of the year at work on the Descent of Man & Selection in relation to Sex’.  Descent was the culmination of over three decades of observations and reflections on…

Matches: 4 hits

  • … more grateful I shall be’  ( letter to H. E. Darwin, [8 February 1870] ). She had previously read …
  • … that I shd. turn parson?’ ( letter to H. E. Darwin, [8 February 1870] ). Henrietta disagreed: …
  • … as the mind of man!’ ( letter from H. E. Darwin, [after 8 February 1870] ). Darwin was also …
  • … he will not succeed’ ( letter to James Crichton-Browne, 8 June [1870] ). Darwin’s queries …

Capturing Darwin’s voice: audio of selected letters

Summary

On a sunny Wednesday in June 2011 in a makeshift recording studio somewhere in Cambridge, we were very pleased to welcome Terry Molloy back to the Darwin Correspondence Project for a special recording session. Terry, known for his portrayal of Davros in Dr…

Matches: 3 hits

  • … Gray. Re: Design toured Britain and America in 2007–8, shedding light on how Darwin developed …
  • … his Wedgwood nieces, Lucy ( [before 25 September 1866] ; 8 June [1867-72?] ) and Sophy ( 8
  • … a draft chapter of Descent (letter to H. E. Darwin, [8 February 1870] ). …

Darwin in letters, 1872: Job done?

Summary

'My career’, Darwin wrote towards the end of 1872, 'is so nearly closed. . .  What little more I can do, shall be chiefly new work’, and the tenor of his correspondence throughout the year is one of wistful reminiscence, coupled with a keen eye…

Matches: 22 hits

  • shall be chiefly new work’ ( letter to Francis Galton, 8 November [1872] ), and the tenor of his
  • are accustomed to novels for 1s’, he wrote to Murray on 8 January , but Murray complained that
  • Darwins best efforts, set the final price at 7 s.  6 d.  ( letter from RFCooke, 12
  • as I can make it’, he wrote to the translator ( letter to JJMoulinié, 23 September 1872 ). He
  • anatomist St George Jackson Mivart ( letter to St GJMivart,  11 January [1872] ). A
  • am made to appear’, complained Darwin ( letter to St GJMivart, 5 January 1872 ). Piqued, …
  • … `fundamental intellectual errors’ ( letter from St GJMivart, 6 January 1872 ). Darwin
  • to think he felt friendly towards me’ ( letter to St GJMivart, 8 January [1872] ).  Despite
  • if only `in another world’ ( letter from St GJMivart,  10 January 1872 ).  Darwin, determined
  • …  but asked Mivart not to acknowledge it ( letter to St GJMivart, 11 January [1872] ). 'I
  • selection is somewhat under a cloud’, he wrote to JETaylor on 13 January , and he complained
  • rather than offended by `that clever book’ ( letter to JMHerbert, 21 November 1872 ) and
  • dispute involving his close friend Joseph Dalton Hooker came to a headHooker, director of the
  • system in the glasshouses had escalated to the point where Hooker applied over Ayrtons head direct
  • your enemies be cursed, is my pious frame of mind Hookers cause was taken up by his
  • the independence of science from bureaucratic interference. Hooker had kept Darwin well informed: …
  • was Darwins wholeheartedly partisan reply ( letter to JDHooker, 14 May 1872 ). On 13 June, a
  • to make one turn into an old honest Tory’ ( letter to JDHooker, 12 July [1872] ). …
  • own muscles when attending women in labour ( letter from JTRothrock, 25 November 1872 ); …
  • of the microscope led his head to `fail’ ( letter to WDFox, 29 October [1872] ) he had begun
  • by hearing about Panagæus!’ Darwin wrote ( letter to WDFox,  16 July [1872] ).  I
  • my life which surprised & gratified me more’ ( letter to JMHerbert, 21 November 1872 ).  …

Darwin in letters, 1868: Studying sex

Summary

The quantity of Darwin’s correspondence increased dramatically in 1868 due largely to his ever-widening research on human evolution and sexual selection.Darwin’s theory of sexual selection as applied to human descent led him to investigate aspects of the…

Matches: 19 hits

  • evolution and sexual selection. In  Origin , pp. 8790, Darwin had briefly introduced the
  • the accursed Index-maker’, Darwin wrote to Joseph Dalton Hooker on 6 January . Darwin had sent
  • I shall look rather blank’ ( letter from W. S. Dallas, 8 January 1868 ). Darwin sympathised, …
  • to read a few pages feel fairly nauseated’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 3 February [1868] ). But such
  • awaythat sparked the most discussion. Darwin wrote to Hooker on 23 February , ‘did you look at
  • thought it was by Gray himself, but Darwin corrected him: ‘D r  Gray would strike me in the face, …
  • editor of the  London and Westminster Review . When Hooker later tried to refute the claims of the
  • a scamp & I begin to think a veritable ass’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 1 September [1868] ). …
  • on 17 April 1868 . The letter was addressed tothe Rev d  C. Darwin M.d’; Binstead evidently
  • … (from ?, 6 April 1868). On 21 May , Darwin complained to Hooker, ‘I am bothered with heaps of
  • kind almost heroic, in you to sacrifice your hair and pay 3 d  in the cause of science
  • information on colour changes in the canary (letters from J. J. Weir, [26] March 1868 and 3
  • added, ‘for it is clear that I have none’ ( letter to J. J. Weir, 30 May [1868] ). Sexual
  • role of colour, sound, and smell in attracting females. J. J. Weir reported on 14 April 1868
  • Wallace that he had begun the previous year, writing to Hooker on 21 May , ‘I always distrust
  • enemies of Nat. Selection’ ( letter from A. R. Wallace, 8 [April] 1868 ). Researching
  • circulated to remote parts of the world. A correspondent of Hookers distributed it in Japan ( …
  • cry (letters to W. E. Darwin, [15 March 1868] and 8 April [1868] ). Such facts proved
  • omnipotent and omniscient Creator’ ( letter to Asa Gray, 8 May [1868] ). Others were concerned

Darwin in letters,1866: Survival of the fittest

Summary

The year 1866 began well for Charles Darwin, as his health, after several years of illness, was now considerably improved. In February, Darwin received a request from his publisher, John Murray, for a new edition of  Origin. Darwin got the fourth…

Matches: 18 hits

  • on publishers, decried on one occasion by Joseph Dalton Hooker asPenny-wise Pound foolish, …
  • Fuller consideration of Darwins work was given by Hooker in an evening speech on insular floras at
  • me any harmany how I cant be idle’ ( letter to W. D. Fox, 24 August [1866] ). Towards
  • continued to refine his hypothesis in 1866. He wrote to Hooker on 16 May [1866] , ‘Iam at work
  • it was too big. ‘You must congratulate me’, he wrote to Hooker, ‘when you hear that I have sent M.S. …
  • Animals & Cult. Plantsto Printers’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 24 December [1866] ). When
  • of Darwins closest scientific friends and correspondents. Hookers research on alpine floras, Henry
  • thinking Agassiz glacier-mad’ ( letter to Charles Lyell, 8[–9] September [1866] ). Darwin
  • have survived and appear in this volume), drawing Darwin, Hooker, and the botanist Charles James Fox
  • more than the belief of a dozen physicists’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [28 February 1866] ). Darwin
  • being more than a subsidiary agent’, Darwin wrote on 8 March [1866] , prefacing his remark with, …
  • … ‘Your fatherentered at the same time with Dr B. J. who received him with triumph. All his friends
  • me to worship Bence Jones in future—’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 13 May 1866 ). Darwin himself
  • tell him the truth how little exertion I can stand. I sh d  like very much to see him, though I
  • of  C. scoparius , sent to Darwin with his letter of 8 May [1866] , allowed detailed
  • … & admit how little is known on the subject’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 3 and 4 August [1866] ). …
  • see how differently we look at every thing’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 5 August [1866] ). Yet both
  • Journal of Science , James Samuelson, in his letter of 8 April 1866 . Wallace argued that the

Women’s scientific participation

Summary

Observers | Fieldwork | Experimentation | Editors and critics | Assistants Darwin’s correspondence helps bring to light a community of women who participated, often actively and routinely, in the nineteenth-century scientific community. Here is a…

Matches: 16 hits

  • in South Africa. Letter 6736 - Gray, A. & J. L to Darwin, [8 & 9 May 1869] …
  • Letter 7223 - Darwin to Wedgwood, L. C., [8 June 1867 - 72] Darwin asks his niece, …
  • on her ongoing observations of wormholes. Letter 8611 - Cupples, A. J. to
  • of emotion in dogs with Emma Darwin. Letter 8676 - Treat, M. to Darwin, [13
  • insects or plants on Darwins behalf. Letter 8683 - Roberts, D. to Darwin, [17
  • of an angry pig and her nieces ears. Letter 8701 - Lubbock, E. F . to Darwin, …
  • she make observations of her pet cats. Letter 8989 - Treat, M. to Darwin, [28 July
  • little treatise”. Letter 4436 - Darwin to Hooker, J. D., [26-27 March 1864] …
  • and orangs. Letter 5705 - Haast, J. F. J. von to Darwin, [4 December 1867] …
  • in a marble tablet”. Letter 6815 - Scott, J. to Darwin, [2 July 1869] John
  • Men: Letter 385  - Wedgwood, S. E. & J. to Darwin, [10 November 1837] …
  • at Maer Hall, Staffordshire. Letter 1219  - Hooker, J. D. to Darwin, [3 February
  • The experiments were carried outat the suggestion of Dr Hookerand what little he has ascertained
  • Women: Letter 2345 - Darwin to Hooker, J. D., [20 October 1858] Darwin
  • of style. Letter 2461  - Darwin to Hooker, J. D., [11 May 1859] Darwin
  • Letter 2475  - Darwin to Hooker, J. D., [2 July 1859] Darwin returns the manuscript of

The Lyell–Lubbock dispute

Summary

In May 1865 a dispute arose between John Lubbock and Charles Lyell when Lubbock, in his book Prehistoric times, accused Lyell of plagiarism. The dispute caused great dismay among many of their mutual scientific friends, some of whom took immediate action…

Matches: 16 hits

  • extinct species such as the mammoth ( Correspondence vol. 8, letter to Charles Lyell, 4 May [1860
  • discussed the book in correspondence with Joseph Dalton Hooker, Asa Gray, and Huxley but he never
  • complaint about the book was more personal. He confided to Hooker that he wasdeeply disappointed’ …
  • what he thought aboutthe derivation of Species’. 8 Darwin continued to feel aggrieved about
  • but had tried, indirectly, to influence him. He told Hooker: 10 Do see Falconer
  • Falconer to tone down his attack on Lyell and agreed, on Hookers advice, to soften a passage in the
  • allude to Sir Cs explanation of the matter’. 23 Hooker, who had also been sent copies of the
  • have given Lyells explanation in print, he disagreed with Hookers assessment of Lubbocks note, …
  • reiterated his admiration for Lubbocks book ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [4 June 1865] ). A week
  • When Hooker pressed him for an opinion ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 13 July 1865 ), Darwin wrote
  • of Antiquity of man (C. Lyell 1863c; see letter from J. D. Hooker, [15 June 1865] and n. 13) …
  • 7. See Correspondence vol. 11, letter to J. D. Hooker, 24[–5] February [1863] . On Lyells
  • theory of transmutation, see Bartholomew 1973. 8. See Correspondence vol. 11, …
  • … ]. 10. Correspondence vol. 11, letter to J. D. Hooker, 17 March [1863] . …
  • have seen is milk & water’ (see enclosure to letter from J. D. Hooker, [15 June 1865] ). …
  • Letters from Charles Lyell to T. H. Huxley, 7 June 1865, and 8 June 1865 (Imperial College, Huxley

Darwin in letters, 1864: Failing health

Summary

On receiving a photograph from Charles Darwin, the American botanist Asa Gray wrote on 11 July 1864: ‘the venerable beard gives the look of your having suffered, and … of having grown older’.  Because of poor health, Because of poor health, Darwin…

Matches: 19 hits

  • exclaimed to his close friend, the botanist Joseph Dalton Hooker: ‘Hurrah! I have been 52 hours
  • 11). In a letter of [27 January 1864] , Darwin wrote to Hooker: ‘The only approach to work which
  • by which  leaves  produce tendrils’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [8 February 1864] ). Darwins
  • …  peduncles to test sensitivity, and in his request to Hooker for another specimen: ‘I want it
  • plant morphology. Many of his other correspondents, such as Hooker and Gray, had grown accustomed to
  • the  Lythrum  paper was published, Darwin remarked to Hooker in a letter of 26 November [1864] …
  • letter of 22 October [1864] , Darwin triumphantly wrote to Hooker: ‘I will fight you to the death, …
  • and 249). When Darwin requested orchid specimens from Hooker in November, he said that he did
  • certain difficult & tedious points’, Darwin asked Hooker about the possibility of Scotts
  • with his stipend being paid by Darwin himself ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [1 April 1864] ). …
  • often at odds with one another: ‘Gardeners are the very dl, & where two or three are gathered
  • enough to play your part  over  them’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, [2 April 1864] ). …
  • … … they do require very careful treatment’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 8 April 1864 ). Nevertheless
  • that in giving I am hastening the fall’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 20 April 1864 ). In his
  • a first-class cabin for the journey ( letter from J. D. Hooker, [15 August 1864] ). Darwin
  • you have bearded this lion in his den’ ( letter to B. D. Walsh, 4 December [1864] ). Walsh also
  • he thought himsanguine & unsafe’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 16 February 1864 ). Hooker
  • correct if they contradicted the Bible ( see letter from J. D. Hooker, [19 September 1864] ). When
  • latestoutburst of bigotry’ ( letter to Hugh Falconer, 8 November [1864] ). Although

Darwin in letters, 1856-1857: the 'Big Book'

Summary

In May 1856, Darwin began writing up his 'species sketch’ in earnest. During this period, his working life was completely dominated by the preparation of his 'Big Book', which was to be called Natural selection. Using letters are the main…

Matches: 11 hits

  • in his immediate circle were Charles Lyell and Joseph Dalton Hooker, who were joined in 1856 by
  • way before. ‘How very odd it is that no zoologist sh  d . ever have thought it worth while to look
  • to make my Book as perfect as ever I can.’ ( letter to W. D. Fox, 8 February [1857] ). …
  • than their lowland relatives. But a last-minute check with Hooker revealed that Darwin was mistaken: …
  • pretty effectuallycomplained Darwin in 1857 ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [2 May 1857] ). …
  • calculations and different ways of working, in letters to Hooker, Gray, and Watson. The results
  • an equally difficult problem that he took in turn to Watson, Hooker, George Bentham, and the Belfast
  • show a separation of the sexes, a proposal that Asa Gray and Hooker confirmed during the course of
  • zoological gardens in London. As he cheerfully explained to Hooker: ‘I must tell you another of my  …
  • bird had naturally eaten have grown well.’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 10 December [1856] ). …
  • … [1856] ). It was after this meeting that Darwin wrote to Hooker to say that Lyell had pressed him

Darwin in letters, 1875: Pulling strings

Summary

‘I am getting sick of insectivorous plants’, Darwin confessed in January 1875. He had worked on the subject intermittently since 1859, and had been steadily engaged on a book manuscript for nine months; January also saw the conclusion of a bitter dispute…

Matches: 12 hits

  • … work of preparing new Editions’, he complained again to Hooker on 18 August. Finally, by …
  • … much more than insectivorous plants. As he confessed to Hooker on 12 December , ‘I have not felt …
  • … deliberating how to end the matter to his satisfaction. On 8 January , he told Hooker: ‘I will …
  • … during the affair by the loyalty of his close friends, Hooker and Thomas Henry Huxley. …
  • … honoured George. You have indeed been a true friend.’ Hooker was hampered by his position as …
  • … & if he speaks to me should let him feel it .’ Hooker also directed some of his anger …
  • … thirst for vengeance is now quite Satisfied’, he told Hooker on 17 January , ‘I feel now like a …
  • … firm. Darwin was impressed by the device, remarking to Hooker on 13 October : ‘Horace has made a …
  • … between Whitney and Max Müller. In Descent 2d ed., pp. 86–8, Darwin had cited Whitney’s …
  • … of having made false statements,’ Darwin replied on 8 April . ‘This is conduct which a man does …
  • … to the Royal Society on his behalf. Darwin complained to Hooker on 13 October , ‘It is not at all …
  • … had reservations about the paper’s merit. He confessed to Hooker two days later, ‘after agonies of …

Darwin in letters, 1869: Forward on all fronts

Summary

At the start of 1869, Darwin was hard at work making changes and additions for a fifth edition of  Origin. He may have resented the interruption to his work on sexual selection and human evolution, but he spent forty-six days on the task. Much of the…

Matches: 17 hits

  • correcting’ ( Correspondence  vol. 16, letter to W. D. Fox, 12 December [1868] ). He may have
  • he remarked to his best friend, the botanist Joseph Dalton Hooker, ‘If I lived 20 more years, & …
  • Well it is a beginning, & that is something’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [22 January 1869] ). …
  • Darwin sent a manuscript of his response (now missing) to Hooker, remarking: ‘I should be extremely
  • blunders, as is very likely to be the case’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 13 January 1869 ). Hooker
  • principle (Nägeli 1865, pp. 289). In further letters, Hooker tried to provide Darwin with botanical
  • January [1869] ). Darwin had argued ( Origin , pp. 3778) that plant species would migrate
  • retrench that position following criticism from his friend Hooker, by admitting that the survival of
  • do fairly well, though if I had read you first, perhaps I d  have been less deferential towards
  • of the female in the garden ( letter from Frederick Smith, 8 October 1869 ). Albert Günther, …
  • males & females, cocks & hens.—’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 13 November [1869] ). Yet
  • … & contemptalmost hatred—’ ( from Asa Gray and J. L. Gray, 8 and 9 May [1869] ). James
  • by Wallaces assertions: ‘If you had not told me I d  have thought that they had been added by
  • commentary (Royer trans. 1870). Darwin complained to Hooker, ‘Besides her enormously long & …
  • … [her] to translateDomestic Animals”’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 19 November [1869] ). Angered by
  • of the whole meeting was decidedly Huxleys answer to D r  M c Cann. He literally poured boiling
  • suggestions to its publisher, Macmillan ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 14 November 1869 ).  Darwin

Darwin in letters, 1860: Answering critics

Summary

On 7 January 1860, John Murray published the second edition of Darwin’s Origin of species, printing off another 3000 copies to satisfy the demands of an audience that surprised both the publisher and the author. It wasn't long, however, before ‘the…

Matches: 17 hits

  • Henry Huxley, William Benjamin Carpenter, and Joseph Dalton Hooker. Others were not quite as
  • cannot expect fairness in a Reviewer’, Darwin commented to Hooker after reading an early notice that
  • of the geological record; but this criticism, he told Hooker, did not at all concern his main
  • mentioned in the volume is given in Correspondence vol. 8, Appendix VII.) The
  • principles of scientific investigation.—’ ( letter to J. S. Henslow, 8 May [1860] ). Above
  • it comes in time to be admitted as real.’ ( letter to C. J. F. Bunbury, 9 February [1860] ). This
  • considered it more a failure than a success ( see letter to J. D. Hooker, 14 February [1860] ). …
  • two physiologists, and five botanists ( see letter to J. D. Hooker, 3 March [1860] ). Others, like
  • … ‘topics of the dayat the meeting in a letter from Hooker written from Oxford. Hookers letter, one
  • Owenhad a furious battle over Darwins absent body’, Hooker attended the fabled Saturday session of
  • of the development of Western civilisation. Wilberforce, Hooker recounted, responded by shouting
  • … ‘master of the field after 4 hours battle’ (letter from J. D. Hooker, 2 July 1860). Other
  • the  Athenæum , are given in Correspondence vol. 8 Appendix VI. Wilberforces review
  • were already proved) to his own views.—’ ( letter from J. S. Henslow to J. D. Hooker, 10 May 1860
  • these visits have led to changed structure.’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 27 April [1860] ). Tracing
  • later, ‘just as at a game of chess.’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 19 [July 1860] ). With the work
  • from non=nitrogenised substances.’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 31 [August 1860] ). Relying in part

Darwin’s hothouse and lists of hothouse plants

Summary

Darwin became increasingly involved in botanical experiments in the years after the publication of Origin. The building of a small hothouse - a heated greenhouse - early in 1863  greatly increased the range of plants that he could keep for scientific…

Matches: 19 hits

  • purposes’ (see  Correspondence  vol10, letter to JD. Hooker, 24 December [1862] , and
  • … (Down House MS) and  Correspondence  vol5, letter to JD. Hooker, 19 April [1855] ). Darwin
  • greenhouse for experiments (see  Correspondence  vols. 810). Though his greenhouse was probably
  • to touch (see  Correspondence  vol10, letter to JD. Hooker, 12 [December 1862] and n13). …
  • … [1862] ( Correspondence  vol10) Darwin told Hooker: I have almost resolved to
  • of prizes & is very observant. He believes that we sh d  succeed with a little patience; …
  • mid-January, and completed by mid-February (see letters to JD. Hooker, 13 January [1863] and
  • from the nearby village of Hayes, and cost a total of £85 11s. 1d.; this included £22 5s. for
  • plants for use in a wide variety of experiments. He told Hooker that he waslooking with much
  • shall keep to curious & experimental plants’ (letter to JD. Hooker, 13 January [1863] ). …
  • with whom he had dealt over many years. In his letter to Hooker, Darwin mentioned that he hoped to
  • plants you want before going to Nurserymen’ (letter from JD. Hooker, [15 January 1863] ). …
  • avoid[,] of course I must not have from Kew’ (letter to JD. Hooker, 30 January [1863] ). …
  • … ‘I long to stock it, just like a school-boy’ (letter to JDHooker, 15 February [1863] ). On
  • … ( Correspondence  vol3, letter to Charles Lyell, 8 October [1845] ). Having indulged
  • plants drawn up by Darwin; these lists are in DAR 255: 8 and DAR 255: 25. The first is a list that
  • Get Edwardsia tetraptera mentioned by Treviranus  Honey. 8 Acropera
  • …   ——  pictus  . 13 8  s     …
  • chæmæcistus 20 Provenance:  DAR 255: 8 Notes 1.  Hugh Low & …

5935_4582

Summary

From J. D. Hooker   26[–7] February 1868KewFeby 26th/68Dear Darwin I have been bursting with impatience to hear what you would say of the Athenæum Review & who wrote it— I could not conceive who…

Matches: 8 hits

  • From JDHooker   26[–7] February 1868 Kew Feby 26 th /68 Dear
  • Pangenesis as I have my crudity. Ever yr affec | J D Hooker
  • please return it.—as I have no time to copy it.— J H. CD
  • underl red crayon 3.7 dependsdoes take3.8] double scored red crayon 3.10 I cannot … …
  • in the Athenæum to Richard Owen (see letter to JDHooker, 23 February [1868]); the review was
  • … ([Beverley] 1867) was reviewed in the Athenæum , 8 February 1868, pp21718. f3 CD had
  • Chronicle , 22 February 1868, p184, in his letter to Hooker of 23 February [1868]. f4
  • f10 These annotations are for CDs reply. See letter to JDHooker, 28 February [1868] and nn. …

Darwin’s reading notebooks

Summary

In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he wished to read in Notebook C (Notebooks, pp. 319–28). In 1839, these lists were copied and continued in separate notebooks. The first of these reading notebooks (DAR 119…

Matches: 25 hits

  • 4  [Pierquin de Gembloux 1839]. Said to be good by D r  L. Lindsay 5 [DAR *119: 1v. …
  • … [A. von Humboldt 1811] Richardsons Fauna Borealis [J. Richardson 182937] …
  • Brown 1814] & at the end of Congo voyage [R. Brown 1818]. (Hooker 923) 7  read
  • on Annals of Nat. Hist. [Jenyns 1838] Prichard; a 3 d . vol [Prichard 183647] Lawrence [W. …
  • Teneriffe. in Pers. Narr. [A. von Humboldt 181429] D r  Royle on Himmalaya types [Royle
  • 39. tom. 4. p. 273. Latreille Geographie des Insectes 8 vo  p 181 [Latreille 1819]. see p. …
  • sheep [Youatt 1831, 1834, 1837]. Verey Philosophie dHist. Nat. [Virey 1835] read
  • Paper on consciousness in brutes Blackwood June 1838 [J. F. Ferrie 1838]. H. C. Watson on
  • Crawford Eastern Archipelago [Crawfurd 1820] Raffeles d[itt]o [T. S. B. Raffles 1817] …
  • … [Temminck 181315] read Temminck has written Coup d’œil sur la Fauna des iles de la Sonde et
  • to White Nat. Hist of Selbourne [E. T. Bennett ed. 1837 and [J. Rennie] ed. 1833] read 19  : …
  • what have they written.? “Hunt” [J. Hunt 1806] p. 290
  • Horticultural Society of London ].— [DAR *119: 8v.] A history of British Birds by
  • de Tératologie, par I. Geoffroy-Saint Hilaire, 3 vols. 8vo. et atlas de 20 planches. ibid, 183236. …
  • Anatomique, par I. Geoffroy-Saint Hilaire, 2 vols. 8vo. avec 2 atlas 4to. ibid, 181823. £1 2 s   …
  • lindication de leurs genres, par M. Latreille, 1 vol. 8vo. 9 s . [Latreille 1825] Mémoire
  • He is Horticulturist in France. Michaux, according to Hooker has written on topography of N. …
  • chiefly on distribution of forms said to be Poor Sir. J. Edwards Botanical Tour [?J. E. Smith
  • Butler. 3. first sermons [Butler 1834] recommended by Sir. J. Mackintosh J. Long Moral Nature
  • … ]. many very useful papers for me:— not in Hort. Soc. Hooker? Rogets Bridgewater Treatise
  • … —— Mauritius & C. of Good Hope Hooker recommends order [Backhouse
  • Decandolles Veg: Organ: } recommended by  Hooker . [A. P. de
  • C. Watson 1845]—