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Darwin in letters, 1865: Delays and disappointments

Summary

The year was marked by three deaths of personal significance to Darwin: Hugh Falconer, a friend and supporter; Robert FitzRoy, captain of the Beagle; and William Jackson Hooker, director of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, and father of Darwin’s friend…

Matches: 14 hits

  • for evaluation, and persuaded his friend Joseph Dalton Hooker to comment on a paper on  Verbascum
  • committed suicide at the end of April; and William Jackson Hooker, director of the Royal Botanic
  • thriving, and when illness made work impossible, Darwin and Hooker read a number of novels, and
  • the Boys at home: they make the house jolly’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 7 January [1865] ). Darwin
  • kind friend to me. So the world goes.—’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 2 February [1865] ). However, …
  • griefs & pains: these alone are unalloyed’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 3 February 1865 ). …
  • Sic transit gloria mundi, with a vengeance’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 9 February [1865] ). …
  • know it is folly & nonsense to try anyone’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 7 January [1865] ). He
  • and Darwin had given it up by early July ( see letter to J. D. Hooker, [10 July 1865] ). In
  • … ‘able to write about an hour on most days’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 22 December [1865] ). …
  • to his publisher, John Murray, ‘Of present book I have 7 chapters ready for press & all others
  • bear the expense of the woodcuts ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 7 January [1865] ). After sending the
  • and Darwin summarised them in  Variation  2: 1067, concluding, ‘it follows from Mr. Scotts
  • of real improvement in health’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 7 January [1865] ). All the children

Darwin in letters, 1863: Quarrels at home, honours abroad

Summary

At the start of 1863, Charles Darwin was actively working on the manuscript of The variation of animals and plants under domestication, anticipating with excitement the construction of a hothouse to accommodate his increasingly varied botanical experiments…

Matches: 9 hits

  • … ‘some Quadrumanum animal’, as he put it in a letter to J. D. Hooker of 24[–5] February [1863] . …
  • … the origin of species particularly, worried Darwin; he told Hooker that he had once thought Lyell …
  • … lack of expertise in the subject. ‘The worst of it is’, Hooker wrote to Darwin, ‘I suppose it is …
  • … credit to his own research and that of Joseph Prestwich. Hooker wrote: ‘I fear L. will get scant …
  • … had contributed to the proofs of human antiquity. Darwin and Hooker repeatedly exchanged regrets …
  • … the public in this way ( see letter from J. D. Hooker, [7 May 1863] , and Appendix VII). He also …
  • … [1863] , and letter from Julius von Haast, 21 July [–7? August] 1863 ). Darwin was subsequently …
  • … paper with satisfaction ( see letter to John Scott, 7 November [1863] ). Scott had referred …
  • … he could send him to the war ( see letter from Asa Gray, 7 July 1863 ). Darwin shared this letter …

Darwin in letters, 1862: A multiplicity of experiments

Summary

1862 was a particularly productive year for Darwin. This was not only the case in his published output (two botanical papers and a book on the pollination mechanisms of orchids), but more particularly in the extent and breadth of the botanical experiments…

Matches: 4 hits

  • … to be referred to routinely. In November, Joseph Dalton Hooker told him: ‘you are alluded to in no …
  • … students to make observations on American species. Hooker and George Bentham at Kew were also …
  • … the distant events to life ( see letter to Asa Gray, 26[–7] November [1862] ). When Darwin …
  • … than almost anywhere else’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 7 March [1862] ). he is so …

Dramatisation script

Summary

Re: Design – Adaptation of the Correspondence of Charles Darwin, Asa Gray and others… by Craig Baxter – as performed 25 March 2007

Matches: 25 hits

  • writings of Asa Gray, Charles Darwin, Joseph Dalton Hooker, Jane Loring Gray Louis Agassiz, Adam
  • this actor uses the words of Jane Loring Gray, Joseph Dalton Hooker, Hugh Falconer, Louis Agassiz, …
  • At this time in his life, Asa Gray is in his late 70s. JANE GRAY: [Jane Loring Grays
  • of natural selection to his friend, the botanist, Joseph D Hooker GRAY:   3   Charles
  • year 1839, and copied and communicated to Messrs Lyell and Hooker in 1844, being a part of
  • as if confessing a murder. DARWIN:   7   January 1844. My dear Hooker. I have been
  • the opportunity I enjoyed of making your acquaintance at Hookers three years ago; and besides that
  • sheet of note-paper! DARWIN11   My dear HookerWhat a remarkably nice and kind
  • 22   Hurrah I got yesterday my 41st Grass! Hooker is younger than Darwin and Gray by
  • species beforeDARWIN24   My dear Hookeryou cannot imagine how pleased I am
  • on your bowels of immutability. Darwin passes to Hooker a brace of letters 25
  • there is a little rap for you. GRAY:   26   Hooker [is] dreadfully paradoxical to
  • as well as any man. I send itDarwin passes to Hooker an envelope of seeds. …
  • and Hawks have often been seen in mid Atlantic. HOOKER:   28   Thanks for your letter
  • interrupts, barely able to suppress his anger. He is in his 70s and in poor health. …
  • records tell us of its historyGRAY:   70   Well, … the book has reached me, and … …
  • by it, to our great delight. AGASSIZ:   71   [I] consider the transmutation theory a
  • and mischievous in its tendency. GRAY:   72   [He] has been helping the circulation
  • one book as I have from yours…. DARWIN75   I should rather think there was a good
  • of this reads quite LamarckianDARWIN:   76   About [the] weak points, I agree. The
  • tells me I ought to conquer the cold shudder. 77   Owen, after much shuffling and
  • statement about Darwins book GRAY:   78   The theory of Agassiz regards the origin
  • of species, to a supernatural for their origin. 79   [I] advise nobody to accept Darwin
  • 19th April [1882], a few months after the completion of his 73rd year. And, on the 26th, the mortal
  • C DARWIN, 1819 AUGUST 1862 149 C DARWIN TO J. D. HOOKER 26 JULY 1863 150

Darwin in letters, 1878: Movement and sleep

Summary

In 1878, Darwin devoted most of his attention to the movements of plants. He investigated the growth pattern of roots and shoots, studying the function of specific organs in this process. Working closely with his son Francis, Darwin devised a series of…

Matches: 11 hits

  • … is to lessen injury to leaves from radiation’, he wrote to Hooker on 25 March ; ‘this has …
  • … in the shape of an arch ( Movement in plants , pp. 96–7). As usual, staff at the Royal Botanical …
  • … my work, I scribble to you ( letter to Francis Darwin, 7 [July 1878] ). Two weeks later he wrote: …
  • … Francis reported ( letter from Francis Darwin, [after 7 July 1878] ): ‘The oats have only just …
  • … the bedded out one’ ( letter from Francis Darwin, [after 7 July 1878] ). Sachs’s confidence was …
  • … are here & all adoring Bernard’, he wrote to Francis on 7 July . ‘Bernard is very sweet & …
  • … to refuse,’ he wrote to William Spottiswoode on 7 July . Pinker later made a statue of Darwin for …
  • … he made a fool of himself at Belfast,’ Darwin wrote to Hooker on 3 or 4 March . ‘I have often …
  • … generations’ ( enclosure to letter to T. H. Farrer, 7 March 1878 ). In the end, the attempt to …
  • … from a person unknown to him. The benefactor wrote on 7 December : ‘I consider that you, more …
  • … oddest thing that ever happened to me’, Darwin wrote to Hooker on 14 December. Mindful of the lack …

Darwin in letters,1866: Survival of the fittest

Summary

The year 1866 began well for Charles Darwin, as his health, after several years of illness, was now considerably improved. In February, Darwin received a request from his publisher, John Murray, for a new edition of  Origin. Darwin got the fourth…

Matches: 18 hits

  • on publishers, decried on one occasion by Joseph Dalton Hooker asPenny-wise Pound foolish, …
  • Fuller consideration of Darwins work was given by Hooker in an evening speech on insular floras at
  • me any harmany how I cant be idle’ ( letter to W. D. Fox, 24 August [1866] ). Towards
  • continued to refine his hypothesis in 1866. He wrote to Hooker on 16 May [1866] , ‘Iam at work
  • it was too big. ‘You must congratulate me’, he wrote to Hooker, ‘when you hear that I have sent M.S. …
  • Animals & Cult. Plantsto Printers’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 24 December [1866] ). When
  • of Darwins closest scientific friends and correspondents. Hookers research on alpine floras, Henry
  • have survived and appear in this volume), drawing Darwin, Hooker, and the botanist Charles James Fox
  • more than the belief of a dozen physicists’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [28 February 1866] ). Darwin
  • … ‘Your fatherentered at the same time with Dr B. J. who received him with triumph. All his friends
  • me to worship Bence Jones in future—’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 13 May 1866 ). Darwin himself
  • tell him the truth how little exertion I can stand. I sh d  like very much to see him, though I
  • ordinaryly diœcious’ ( letter from W. E. Darwin, [7 May11 June 1866] ). On examining more
  • … & admit how little is known on the subject’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 3 and 4 August [1866] ). …
  • see how differently we look at every thing’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 5 August [1866] ). Yet both
  • a different light from you’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 7 August 1866 ). The two exchanged letters
  • held forth against  Origin  (J. D. Hooker 1866a, pp. 50, 756). The progress of reception
  • letter from E. C. Langton to Emma and Charles Darwin, [6 and 7? January 1866] ), and Darwin later

Darwin in letters, 1875: Pulling strings

Summary

‘I am getting sick of insectivorous plants’, Darwin confessed in January 1875. He had worked on the subject intermittently since 1859, and had been steadily engaged on a book manuscript for nine months; January also saw the conclusion of a bitter dispute…

Matches: 13 hits

  • … work of preparing new Editions’, he complained again to Hooker on 18 August. Finally, by …
  • … much more than insectivorous plants. As he confessed to Hooker on 12 December , ‘I have not felt …
  • … during the affair by the loyalty of his close friends, Hooker and Thomas Henry Huxley. …
  • … honoured George. You have indeed been a true friend.’ Hooker was hampered by his position as …
  • … ‘Without cutting him direct’, he advised Darwin on 7 January , ‘I should avoid him, & if he …
  • … thirst for vengeance is now quite Satisfied’, he told Hooker on 17 January , ‘I feel now like a …
  • … can make several parts clearer,’ Darwin reiterated on 7 November , ‘I believe (though I hope I am …
  • … firm. Darwin was impressed by the device, remarking to Hooker on 13 October : ‘Horace has made a …
  • … ancestry. ‘You know better than anybody’, he wrote on 7 January , ‘how infinitely great is the …
  • … the Duke of Wellington on art (Max Müller 1875, pp. 305–7). The debate between Max Müller and …
  • … to the Royal Society on his behalf. Darwin complained to Hooker on 13 October , ‘It is not at all …
  • … had reservations about the paper’s merit. He confessed to Hooker two days later, ‘after agonies of …
  • … Down with Thiselton-Dyer ( letter to W. T. Thiselton-Dyer, 7 July 1875 ). It was Thiselton-Dyer …

The Lyell–Lubbock dispute

Summary

In May 1865 a dispute arose between John Lubbock and Charles Lyell when Lubbock, in his book Prehistoric times, accused Lyell of plagiarism. The dispute caused great dismay among many of their mutual scientific friends, some of whom took immediate action…

Matches: 14 hits

  • discussed the book in correspondence with Joseph Dalton Hooker, Asa Gray, and Huxley but he never
  • complaint about the book was more personal. He confided to Hooker that he wasdeeply disappointed’ …
  • but had tried, indirectly, to influence him. He told Hooker: 10 Do see Falconer
  • Falconer to tone down his attack on Lyell and agreed, on Hookers advice, to soften a passage in the
  • allude to Sir Cs explanation of the matter’. 23 Hooker, who had also been sent copies of the
  • have given Lyells explanation in print, he disagreed with Hookers assessment of Lubbocks note, …
  • reiterated his admiration for Lubbocks book ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [4 June 1865] ). A week
  • When Hooker pressed him for an opinion ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 13 July 1865 ), Darwin wrote
  • of Antiquity of man (C. Lyell 1863c; see letter from J. D. Hooker, [15 June 1865] and n. 13) …
  • 1863a are discussed in Bynum 1984, pp. 1549. 7. See Correspondence vol. 11, letter
  • vol. 11, letter to Charles Lyell, 6 March [1863] and n. 7. 9. See Correspondence
  • … ]. 10. Correspondence vol. 11, letter to J. D. Hooker, 17 March [1863] . …
  • have seen is milk & water’ (see enclosure to letter from J. D. Hooker, [15 June 1865] ). …
  • 14, doc. 1834). 15. Letter from T. H. Huxley, 7 March 1865, in BL MSS ADD 49641. …

Darwin in letters, 1868: Studying sex

Summary

The quantity of Darwin’s correspondence increased dramatically in 1868 due largely to his ever-widening research on human evolution and sexual selection.Darwin’s theory of sexual selection as applied to human descent led him to investigate aspects of the…

Matches: 20 hits

  • the accursed Index-maker’, Darwin wrote to Joseph Dalton Hooker on 6 January . Darwin had sent
  • … ). Darwin sympathised, replying on 14 January , ‘I sh d  have a very bad heart, as hard as
  • to read a few pages feel fairly nauseated’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 3 February [1868] ). But such
  • Darwin was clearly impressed by Lewess reviews. On 7 August 1868 , he wrote him a lengthy letter
  • awaythat sparked the most discussion. Darwin wrote to Hooker on 23 February , ‘did you look at
  • thought it was by Gray himself, but Darwin corrected him: ‘D r  Gray would strike me in the face, …
  • editor of the  London and Westminster Review . When Hooker later tried to refute the claims of the
  • a scamp & I begin to think a veritable ass’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 1 September [1868] ). …
  • on 17 April 1868 . The letter was addressed tothe Rev d  C. Darwin M.d’; Binstead evidently
  • … (from ?, 6 April 1868). On 21 May , Darwin complained to Hooker, ‘I am bothered with heaps of
  • kind almost heroic, in you to sacrifice your hair and pay 3 d  in the cause of science
  • information on colour changes in the canary (letters from J. J. Weir, [26] March 1868 and 3
  • … , ‘almost heroic, in you to sacrifice your hair and pay 3 d  in the cause of science.’ Darwin
  • added, ‘for it is clear that I have none’ ( letter to J. J. Weir, 30 May [1868] ). Sexual
  • role of colour, sound, and smell in attracting females. J. J. Weir reported on 14 April 1868
  • Wallace that he had begun the previous year, writing to Hooker on 21 May , ‘I always distrust
  • circulated to remote parts of the world. A correspondent of Hookers distributed it in Japan ( …
  • undergoing vaccination ( letter from W. E. Darwin, [7 April 1868] ). Francis was also drafted into
  • the Linnean Society of London on 19 March. In a letter to Hooker on 21 May , he enthused over an
  • desire to penetrate Truth’ ( letter from Ernest Faivre, 7 April 1868 ). Armand de Quatrefages, who

Darwin in letters, 1874: A turbulent year

Summary

The year 1874 was one of consolidation, reflection, and turmoil for Darwin. He spent the early months working on second editions of Coral reefs and Descent of man; the rest of the year was mostly devoted to further research on insectivorous plants. A…

Matches: 20 hits

  • by observation during prolonged intervals’ ( letter to D. T. Gardner, [ c . 27 August 1874] ). …
  • of shooting and collecting beetles ( letter from W. D. Fox, 8 May [1874] ).  Such reminiscences
  • looks backwards much more than forwards’ ( letter to W. D. Fox, 11 May [1874] ). I
  • hope.— I feel very old & helpless’  ( letter to B. J. Sulivan, 6 January [1874] ). Darwin
  • to believe in such rubbish’, he confided to Joseph Dalton Hooker ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 18
  • the publishers, he applied first to his friend Joseph Dalton Hooker, and finally borrowed one from
  • for misinterpreting Darwin on this point ( letter from J. D. Dana, 21 July 1874 ); however, he did
  • sexual criminality of Pagan days’ ([Mivart] 1874b, p. 70). 'scurrilous libel' …
  • Correspondence vol. 22, Appendix V and Dawson 2007, pp. 7781). Darwin first considered taking
  • … ‘Im a grown man now’, he reminded Darwin, ‘& sh d . stand on my own footing, & if it is
  • … & it had been refused’ ( letter from G. H. Darwin, [6 or 7 August 1874] ). When the letter was
  • Mivart (see  Correspondence  vol. 20, letter to St G. J. Mivart, 11 January [1872] ). To Darwin
  • views. In December, he sought advice from Huxley and Hooker, sending them a draft letter that
  • Mivart had written the article ( enclosure to letter from J. D. Hooker, 21 December 1874 ). Huxley
  • to write to Mivart directly after he knew the full result of Hookers and Huxleys representations ( …
  • or adviseable’. On Christmas Eve, Darwin wrote to Hooker that they were still in a dilemma
  • 15 th  he published that shabby rejoinder’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 24 December [1874] ).  On
  • removed as secretary of the Linnean Society  ( letter From J. D. Hooker, 29 December 1874 ). …
  • from the moment of being hatched ( letter to  Nature , 7 and 11 May [1874] ; Spalding 1872a). …
  • from his sons George and Francis ( letter to Anton Dohrn, 7 March 1874 ). Dohrn replied

Darwin's in letters, 1873: Animal or vegetable?

Summary

Having laboured for nearly five years on human evolution, sexual selection, and the expression of emotions, Darwin was able to devote 1873 almost exclusively to his beloved plants. He resumed work on the digestive powers of sundews and Venus fly traps, and…

Matches: 7 hits

  • … a specimen of the carnivorous  Drosophyllum lusitanicum , Hooker wrote: “Pray work your wicked …
  • … at the end of November 1872 and sold quickly. He wrote to Hooker on 12 January [1873] , “Did I …
  • … privilege to offer” ( letter from E. F. Lubbock, [before 7 April 1873] ). Hooker added: “I have …
  • … friend— but he is a deal too sharp” ( letter from J. D. Hooker, [7 April 1873] ). A group …
  • … to worry, however, that he would overwork himself, and so Hooker volunteered to accompany him on a …
  • … than species are permanent” ( letter from John Farr, 7 July 1873 ). Further thoughts on the …
  • … past memories” ( letter to A. A. L. P. Cochrane, [after 7 June 1873] ). Darwin did accept …

List of correspondents

Summary

Below is a list of Darwin's correspondents with the number of letters for each one. Click on a name to see the letters Darwin exchanged with that correspondent.    "A child of God" (1) Abberley,…

Matches: 22 hits

  • Abbot, F. E. (17) Abernethy, J. W. (1) …
  • Allen, Grant (13) Allen, J. A. (b) (1) …
  • Allen, Thomas (2) Allman, G. J. (4) …
  • Isaac (17) Andersson, C. J. (3) …
  • Ansell, G. F. (1) Ansted, D. T. (8) …
  • … (2) Arruda Furtado, Francisco d’ (10) …
  • Athenæum (11) Atkin, J. R. (1) …
  • Ayres, W. P. (1) B. J. Edwards & Co. (1) …
  • Balch, C. L. (3) Baldwin, J. D. (2) …
  • J. H. (2) Bartlett, A. D. (15) …
  • … (36) Baxter, William (7) Baynes, H. M. …
  • … (1) Blair, R. A. (7) Blair, R. H. (4
  • … (3) Boott, Francis (7) Boott, Mary
  • Brooks, W. C. (1) Brown, D. J. (1) …
  • Dudley (1) Campbell, G. D. (3) Canby
  • … & Galpin (1) Caton, J. D. (9) …
  • … (1) Chambers, Robert (7) Chance, Frank
  • … (3) Clarke, R. T. (7) Clarke, T. W. …
  • Mary (1) Conway, M. D. (9) Conybeare
  • B. A. E. (1) Cooper, J. D. (2) …
  • … (6) Darwin, V. H. (7) Darwin, Violetta
  • Holub, Emil (3) Hooker, F. H. (12) …

Darwin in letters, 1869: Forward on all fronts

Summary

At the start of 1869, Darwin was hard at work making changes and additions for a fifth edition of  Origin. He may have resented the interruption to his work on sexual selection and human evolution, but he spent forty-six days on the task. Much of the…

Matches: 17 hits

  • correcting’ ( Correspondence  vol. 16, letter to W. D. Fox, 12 December [1868] ). He may have
  • he remarked to his best friend, the botanist Joseph Dalton Hooker, ‘If I lived 20 more years, & …
  • Well it is a beginning, & that is something’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [22 January 1869] ). …
  • Darwin sent a manuscript of his response (now missing) to Hooker, remarking: ‘I should be extremely
  • blunders, as is very likely to be the case’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 13 January 1869 ). Hooker
  • principle (Nägeli 1865, pp. 289). In further letters, Hooker tried to provide Darwin with botanical
  • countered Nägelis thesis ( Origin  5th ed., pp. 1517). Fleeming Jenkin and problems of
  • retrench that position following criticism from his friend Hooker, by admitting that the survival of
  • do fairly well, though if I had read you first, perhaps I d  have been less deferential towards
  • males & females, cocks & hens.—’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 13 November [1869] ). Yet
  • … & contemptalmost hatred—’ ( from Asa Gray and J. L. Gray, 8 and 9 May [1869] ). James
  • by Wallaces assertions: ‘If you had not told me I d  have thought that they had been added by
  • in Patagonia and Wales ( letter from T. H. Huxley, 7 May 1869 , letter from W. B. Dawkins, 17
  • commentary (Royer trans. 1870). Darwin complained to Hooker, ‘Besides her enormously long & …
  • … [her] to translateDomestic Animals”’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 19 November [1869] ). Angered by
  • of the whole meeting was decidedly Huxleys answer to D r  M c Cann. He literally poured boiling
  • suggestions to its publisher, Macmillan ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 14 November 1869 ).  Darwin

Scientific Networks

Summary

Friendship|Mentors|Class|Gender In its broadest sense, a scientific network is a set of connections between people, places, and things that channel the communication of knowledge, and that substantially determine both its intellectual form and content,…

Matches: 9 hits

  • tapping into the networks of others, such as Joseph Dalton Hooker and Asa Gray, who were at leading
  • of face-to-face contact. His correspondence with Joseph Hooker and Asa Gray illustrates how close
  • The first is between Darwin and his friend Kew botanist J. D. Hooker. The second is between Darwin
  • … “it is like confessing a murder”. Letter 736Darwin, C. R. to Hooker, J. D., 23 Feb
  • Letter 1202Darwin, C. R. to Hooker, J. D., 6 Oct [1848] Darwin catches up on personal
  • name to specific name. Letter 1220Hooker, J. D. to Darwin, C. R., 3 Feb 1849 In
  • Letter 1260Darwin, C. R. to Hooker, J. D., 12 Oct 1849 Darwin opens by discussing their
  • Letter 1319Hooker, J. D. to Darwin, C. R., 6 & 7 Apr 1850 Hooker apologises for the
  • … — Darwin, C. R. to Henslow, J. S., 24 July & 28 Oct & 7 Nov 1834 Darwin is excited by

Darwin in letters, 1871: An emptying nest

Summary

The year 1871 was an extremely busy and productive one for Darwin, with the publication in February of his long-awaited book on human evolution, Descent of man. The other main preoccupation of the year was the preparation of his manuscript on expression.…

Matches: 8 hits

  • … be well abused’, he wrote to his friend Joseph Dalton Hooker on 21 January , ‘for as my son Frank …
  • … the proof-sheets, rather than waiting for the bound copies. Hooker suggested one of the reasons …
  • … allotted space each morning ( letter from Arthur Nicols, 7 March 1871 ; letter from B. J. …
  • … tell heavily against natural selection’, Darwin wrote to Hooker on 21 January . Darwin read the …
  • … arrogant, odious beast that ever lived,’ Darwin wrote to Hooker on 16 September . Darwin …
  • … laughing. crying grinning pouting &c. &c’, he wrote to Hooker on 21 March . Darwin …
  • … similar query with the artist Thomas Woolner, inquiring on 7 April whether ‘young and …
  • … in June, and was married on 31 August. Darwin remarked to Hooker on 23 July , ‘her loss will be …

Darwin in letters, 1864: Failing health

Summary

On receiving a photograph from Charles Darwin, the American botanist Asa Gray wrote on 11 July 1864: ‘the venerable beard gives the look of your having suffered, and … of having grown older’.  Because of poor health, Because of poor health, Darwin…

Matches: 20 hits

  • Darwin had consulted in 1863. In a letter of 26[–7] March [1864] , Darwin exclaimed to his close
  • 11). In a letter of [27 January 1864] , Darwin wrote to Hooker: ‘The only approach to work which
  • by which  leaves  produce tendrils’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [8 February 1864] ). Darwins
  • …  peduncles to test sensitivity, and in his request to Hooker for another specimen: ‘I want it
  • plant morphology. Many of his other correspondents, such as Hooker and Gray, had grown accustomed to
  • the  Lythrum  paper was published, Darwin remarked to Hooker in a letter of 26 November [1864] …
  • letter of 22 October [1864] , Darwin triumphantly wrote to Hooker: ‘I will fight you to the death, …
  • and 249). When Darwin requested orchid specimens from Hooker in November, he said that he did
  • with his stipend being paid by Darwin himself ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [1 April 1864] ). …
  • often at odds with one another: ‘Gardeners are the very dl, & where two or three are gathered
  • enough to play your part  over  them’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, [2 April 1864] ). …
  • … … they do require very careful treatment’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 8 April 1864 ). Nevertheless
  • that in giving I am hastening the fall’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 20 April 1864 ). In his
  • a first-class cabin for the journey ( letter from J. D. Hooker, [15 August 1864] ). Darwin
  • eastern and mid-western states. In his letter to Darwin of 7 November 1864, Walsh denounced Agassiz
  • and Book of Joshua critically examined  (Colenso 186279). After reading extracts from Colensos
  • he thought himsanguine & unsafe’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 16 February 1864 ). Hooker
  • correct if they contradicted the Bible ( see letter from J. D. Hooker, [19 September 1864] ). When
  • of Herbert Spencers  Principles of biology  (18647). Also unsure about Spencers work, Hooker
  • particularly when Hugh Falconer suggested in his letter of 7 November [1864] that half the

Darwin in letters, 1879: Tracing roots

Summary

Darwin spent a considerable part of 1879 in the eighteenth century. His journey back in time started when he decided to publish a biographical account of his grandfather Erasmus Darwin to accompany a translation of an essay on Erasmus’s evolutionary ideas…

Matches: 15 hits

  • Darwin had written: ‘The worst thing I find now is this dnd old age, which creeps slily upon one, …
  • admiration of his grandfather: ‘The more I read of Dr. D. the higher he rises in my estimation.’ …
  • … ‘almost indispensable’ ( letter from Ernst Krause, 7 June 1879 ). Darwin welcomed Krauses
  • it, leaving Darwinmore perplexed than ever about life of D r . D’ ( letter to Francis Darwin, …
  • which is his profession thonot a profitable one; also D r  C[lark]’s opinion that he was so
  • when the acorns failed to ripen, Darwin had to ask Joseph Hooker to come to his rescue by sending
  • scarlet oak: ‘to be planted in my honour!’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 4 November [1879] ). While in
  • dogma’, Mary Jung, a young Austrian woman, wrote on 7 January . ‘When my reason agrees with your
  • be an atheist, Darwin told the clergyman John Fordyce on 7 May , ‘It seems to me absurd to doubt
  • knowledgeobservation & experiment’ ( letter from J. F. Moulton, 10 December 1879 ). In reply
  • image of the frog be published in Nature ( letter to J. N. Lockyer, 4 and 6 March [1879] ). …
  • and his family to the Riviera for the summer ( letter to G. J. Romanes, 23 July 1879 ). Allen, who
  • prospects were precarious. Darwin contacted Joseph Hooker on 17 December to ask his opinion: ‘I
  • been saved from amistake & mess’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 19 December [1879] ). The German
  • work in such an outstanding way’, Würtenberger wrote on 7 February , after receiving £100 from

Darwin’s reading notebooks

Summary

In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he wished to read in Notebook C (Notebooks, pp. 319–28). In 1839, these lists were copied and continued in separate notebooks. The first of these reading notebooks (DAR 119…

Matches: 24 hits

  • 4  [Pierquin de Gembloux 1839]. Said to be good by D r  L. Lindsay 5 [DAR *119: 1v. …
  • … [A. von Humboldt 1811] Richardsons Fauna Borealis [J. Richardson 182937] …
  • Brown 1814] & at the end of Congo voyage [R. Brown 1818]. (Hooker 923) 7  read
  • on Annals of Nat. Hist. [Jenyns 1838] Prichard; a 3 d . vol [Prichard 183647] Lawrence [W. …
  • Teneriffe. in Pers. Narr. [A. von Humboldt 181429] D r  Royle on Himmalaya types [Royle
  • reference to authors about E. Indian Islands 8 consult D r  Horsfield [Horsfield 1824] …
  • sheep [Youatt 1831, 1834, 1837]. Verey Philosophie dHist. Nat. [Virey 1835] read
  • de S t  Hilaire 1832 [I. Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire 18327] contains all his fathers views Quoted by
  • Paper on consciousness in brutes Blackwood June 1838 [J. F. Ferrie 1838]. H. C. Watson on
  • Volneys 18  Travels in Syria [Volney 1787].—vol I. p. 71. account of Europæan plants transplanted
  • … [Temminck 181315] read Temminck has written Coup d’œil sur la Fauna des iles de la Sonde et
  • to White Nat. Hist of Selbourne [E. T. Bennett ed. 1837 and [J. Rennie] ed. 1833] read 19  : …
  • of Asiatic Soc. Vol. II & Vol. III [DAR *119: 7v.] Storia della Riproduzione
  • what have they written.? “Hunt” [J. Hunt 1806] p. 290
  • on geograph distrib of Man. Mentioned by Athenæum 1839 p. 765. in Geograph. Soc?? Review of this in
  • He is Horticulturist in France. Michaux, according to Hooker has written on topography of N. …
  • chiefly on distribution of forms said to be Poor Sir. J. Edwards Botanical Tour [?J. E. Smith
  • Butler. 3. first sermons [Butler 1834] recommended by Sir. J. Mackintosh J. Long Moral Nature
  • … ]. many very useful papers for me:— not in Hort. Soc. Hooker? Rogets Bridgewater Treatise
  • … —— Mauritius & C. of Good Hope Hooker recommends order [Backhouse
  • Decandolles Veg: Organ: } recommended by  Hooker . [A. P. de
  • C. Watson 1845]— gives up permanent species (alluded to by Hooker) Foreign & British Med. …
  • 43 Lindleys Vegetable Kingdom [Lindley 1846]. Hooker says very good for my purpose
  • Phytologist [ Phytologistmust be read . Hooker. read Fortunes Travels in China

Darwin in letters, 1880: Sensitivity and worms

Summary

There are summaries of all Darwin's letters from the year 1880 on this website.  The full texts of the letters are not yet available online but are in volume 28 of the print edition of The correspondence of Charles Darwin, published by Cambridge…

Matches: 4 hits

  • … ( Correspondence vol. 27, letter from Ernst Krause, 7 June 1879 , and letter to Ernst Krause …
  • … study to public-school pupils ( letter to Francis Galton, 7 April 1880 , and letter from Francis …
  • … In the previous year, he had consulted Joseph Dalton Hooker about the possibility of a Civil List …
  • … B. Buckley, 31 October [1880] ). Buckley reported back on 7 November : ‘At first he hesitated …

Darwin and Fatherhood

Summary

Charles Darwin married Emma Wedgwood in 1839 and over the next seventeen years the couple had ten children. It is often assumed that Darwin was an exceptional Victorian father. But how extraordinary was he? The Correspondence Project allows an unusually…

Matches: 4 hits

  • … father when he was working (Darwin to his wife Emma,  [7-8 February 1845] ). Although Darwin did …
  • … period, as Darwin’s attempts to comfort his friend Joseph Hooker on the death of his six-year-old …
  • … had courage to break through the trammels.’ (Darwin to W. D. Fox,  7 March [1852] ). A more modern …
  • … for a game of Billiards’. (Darwin to his son William,  7 July [1859] ). Whole family outings were …
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