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From J. D. Hooker   3 March 1862

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Had it not been for CD, JDH would never have written such papers as his one on Arctic flora. The "evulgation" of CD’s views is the purest pleasure he derives from them.

He too is staggered that Greenland ought to have been depopulated during the glacial period. Absence of Caltha is fatal to its re-population by chance migration.

Author:  Joseph Dalton Hooker
Addressee:  Charles Robert Darwin
Date:  3 Mar 1862
Classmark:  DAR 101: 17–19
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-3465

To J. D. Hooker   7 March [1862]

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CD wishes he could sympathise with Asa Gray’s politics.

Orchids to appear soon.

Pre-glacial Arctic distribution.

Work on floral dimorphism.

High opinion of Buckle as a writer.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Joseph Dalton Hooker
Date:  7 Mar [1862]
Classmark:  DAR 115: 185
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-3468

From J. D. Hooker   [10 March 1862]

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Returns Asa Gray’s letter. Disappointed with Gray. Comments on America. British–American relations.

Author:  Joseph Dalton Hooker
Addressee:  Charles Robert Darwin
Date:  [10 Mar 1862]
Classmark:  DAR 101: 20–2; Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-3469

To J. D. Hooker   14 March [1862]

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Thinks JDH is a bit hard on Asa Gray.

Bates’s letter is that of a true thinker. Asks to see JDH’s to Bates. Point raised in it is most difficult. "There is one clear line of distinction; – when many parts of structure as in woodpecker show distinct adaptation to external bodies, it is preposterous to attribute them to effect of climate etc. – but when a single point, alone, as a hooked seed, it is conceivable that it may thus have arisen." His study of orchids shows nearly all parts of the flower co-adapted for fertilisation by insects and therefore the result of natural selection. Mormodes ignea "is a prodigy of adaptation".

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Joseph Dalton Hooker
Date:  14 Mar [1862]
Classmark:  DAR 115: 150
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-3472

From J. D. Hooker   17 March 1862

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JDH has probably influenced Bates by pointing out applicability of CD’s views to his cases.

Is greatly puzzled by difference in effect of external conditions on individual animals and plants. Cannot conceive that climate could affect even such a single character as a hooked seed.

Does not think Huxley is right about "saltus".

Author:  Joseph Dalton Hooker
Addressee:  Charles Robert Darwin
Date:  17 Mar 1862
Classmark:  DAR 101: 23–6
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-3474

To J. D. Hooker   18 March [1862]

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On effect of external conditions: CD thinks all variability due to changes in conditions of life because there is more variability under unnatural domestic conditions than under nature, and changed conditions affect the reproductive organs. But why one seedling out of thousands presents some new character transcends the wildest powers of conjecture.

Not shaken by "saltus" – he had examined all cases of normal structure resembling monstrosities which appear per saltum. Has fought his tendency to attribute too much to natural selection; perhaps he has too much conquered it.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Joseph Dalton Hooker
Date:  18 Mar [1862]
Classmark:  DAR 115: 145
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-3479

From J. D. Hooker   [23 March 1862]

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Lighthearted thoughts on "the development of an Aristocracy" after a visit to Walcot Hall, Shropshire.

On CD’s point about the effect of changed conditions on the reproductive organs, JDH does not see why this is not "itself a variation, not necessarily induced by domestication, but accompanying some variety artificially selected".

Author:  Joseph Dalton Hooker
Addressee:  Charles Robert Darwin
Date:  [23 Mar 1862]
Classmark:  DAR 101: 27–9; American Philosophical Society Library (Hooker papers, B/H76.2)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-3480

To J. D. Hooker   22 [March 1862]

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Asks JDH to correct names of two species of Calanthe.

Note from Asa Gray ends "Yours cordially", so CD hopes he is forgiven.

His Catasetum paper will be read 3 Apr [Collected papers 2: 63–70].

Plants and seeds sent will be of great use, especially Lythrum, which according to J. P. E. Vaucher seems grand case of trimorphism. Asks what sort of man Vaucher is.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Joseph Dalton Hooker
Date:  22 [Mar 1862]
Classmark:  DAR 115: 146
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-3481

From J. D. Hooker   [23–5 March 1862]

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Identifies Calanthe masuca.

Asa Gray would not quarrel with them – "snubbing from us may have done him more good than our sympathy".

If CD means the old Vaucher, he was considered a very accurate, acute, able observer.

Author:  Joseph Dalton Hooker
Addressee:  Charles Robert Darwin
Date:  [23–5 Mar 1862]
Classmark:  DAR 101: 30
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-3483

To J. D. Hooker   26 [March 1862]

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Both JDH’s and Bates’s letters are excellent. JDH has said all that can be said against direct effect of conditions, but CD still sticks to his own and Bates’s side. CD should have done what JDH suggests (since naturally he is pleased to attribute little to conditions) – viz., started on the fundamental principle that variation is innate and stated that afterwards, perhaps, this principle would be made explicable. Variation will show that "use and disuse" have some effect. Does not believe in perfect reversion. Demurs at JDH’s "centrifugal variation"; the doctrine of the good of diversification amply accounts for variation being centrifugal.

The wonderful mechanism of Mormodes ignea.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Joseph Dalton Hooker
Date:  26 [Mar 1862]
Classmark:  DAR 115: 147
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-3484

From J. D. Hooker   [after 26 March 1862?]

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Variations are centrifugal because the chances are a million to one that identity of form once lost will return.

In the human race, we find no reversion "that would lead us to confound a man with his ancestors".

Author:  Joseph Dalton Hooker
Addressee:  Charles Robert Darwin
Date:  [after 26 Mar 1862?]
Classmark:  DAR 47: 214
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-3486

To J. D. Hooker   [1 March – 15 May 1862]

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[List of plants in CD’s hand, with notes by JDH identifying them.]

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Joseph Dalton Hooker
Date:  [1 Mar – 15 May 1862]
Classmark:  DAR 101: 87
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-3884
Document type
letter (12)
Addressee
Correspondent
Date
1862
03
01 (1)
03 (1)
07 (1)
10 (1)
14 (1)
17 (1)
18 (1)
22 (1)
23 (2)
26 (2)
letter