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To Asa Gray   2 May [1856]

Summary

Suggests affinities of the U. S. flora that he considers would be worth investigating. Wants to know the ranges of species in large and small genera.

Questions AG on naturalised plants; whether any are social in U. S. which are not so elsewhere and how variable they are compared with indigenous species. Would like to know of any differences in the variability of species at different points of their ranges and also the physical states of plants at the extremes of their ranges.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Asa Gray
Date:  2 May [1856]
Classmark:  Archives of the Gray Herbarium, Harvard University (4)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-1863

To Asa Gray   14 July [1856]

Summary

Asks whether Allegheny Mountains are sufficiently continuous so that plants could travel from north to south along them.

Hopes AG’s work on geographical distribution is progressing, as he has questions on plants common to Europe which do not range up to Arctic.

Are intermediate varieties less numerous in individuals than the varieties they connect?

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Asa Gray
Date:  14 July [1856]
Classmark:  Archives of the New York Botanical Garden (Charles Finney Cox Collection)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-1926

To Asa Gray   24 August [1856]

Summary

Rarity of intermediate varieties.

Variability of introduced plants.

Ranges of plants common to Europe and U. S.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Asa Gray
Date:  24 Aug [1856]
Classmark:  Archives of the Gray Herbarium, Harvard University (36)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-1944

To Asa Gray   12 October [1856]

Summary

Thanks AG for the first part of his "Statistics [of the flora of the northern U. S.", Am. J. Sci. 2d ser. 22 (1856): 204–32; 2d ser. 23 (1857): 62–84, 369–403]

and for information on social and varying plants.

Would like to know number of genera of introduced plants in U. S.

Is surprised at some affinities of northern U. S. flora and asks for any climatic explanations.

Asks what proportion of genera common to U. S. and Europe are mundane.

Is glad AG will work out the northern ranges of the European species and the ranges of species with regard to size of genera.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Asa Gray
Date:  12 Oct [1856]
Classmark:  Archives of the Gray Herbarium, Harvard University (6)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-1973

To Asa Gray   24 November [1856]

Summary

Variability of naturalised plants.

Distribution of Arctic/alpine plant species.

Limits to the northern range of plants.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Asa Gray
Date:  24 Nov [1856]
Classmark:  Archives of the Gray Herbarium, Harvard University (5)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-1999

From Asa Gray   [early August 1856]

Summary

Believes intermediate varieties are generally less numerous in individuals than the two states that they connect.

Discusses the difficulties of deciding what is the typical form of a species

and gives some opinions on the variability of introduced species compared with indigenous species.

Author:  Asa Gray
Addressee:  Charles Robert Darwin
Date:  [early Aug 1856]
Classmark:  DAR 165: 93
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-1934

From Asa Gray   23 September 1856

Summary

Plants that are social in the U. S. but are not so in the Old World.

Distribution of U. S. species common to Europe.

Gives Theodor Engelmann’s opinion on the relative variability of indigenous and introduced plants and notes the effects of man’s settlement on the numbers and distribution of indigenous plants.

Author:  Asa Gray
Addressee:  Charles Robert Darwin
Date:  23 Sept 1856
Classmark:  DAR 165: 94
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-1959

From Asa Gray   4 November 1856

Summary

Outlines the ranges of northern U. S. species common to Europe. Hopes to investigate the resemblances between the floras of the north-eastern U. S. and western Europe. Discusses routes by which alpine plants appear to have reached U. S.

Author:  Asa Gray
Addressee:  Charles Robert Darwin
Date:  4 Nov 1856
Classmark:  DAR 165: 95
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-1982
Document type
letter (8)
Author
Addressee
Correspondent
Darwin, C. R.[X]
Gray, Asa[X]
Date
1856
05 (1)
07 (1)
08 (2)
09 (1)
10 (1)
11 (2)
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