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To Susan Darwin   14 July – 7 August [1832]

Summary

Regrets leaving the tropics, despite interest in a land where Europeans have never been. They have experienced political turmoil at Montevideo. Natural history going well.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Susan Elizabeth Darwin
Date:  14 July – 7 Aug [1832]
Classmark:  DAR 223
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-177

To J. S. Henslow   [23 July –] 15 August [1832]

Summary

Specimens being sent off. Describes his collection of rocks, plants, and insects. Some particularly interesting specimens.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  John Stevens Henslow
Date:  [23 July –] 15 Aug [1832]
Classmark:  Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew (Henslow letters: 13 DAR/1/1/13)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-178

To Frederick Watkins   18 August 1832

Summary

Brief summary of the voyage so far. His delight in the Brazilian forest; his trip into the interior; the turbulence at Rio; has grown a beard.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Frederick Watkins
Date:  18 Aug 1832
Classmark:  Copy
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-181

To W. D. Fox   [12–3] November 1832

Summary

Sketches the Beagle’s travels – Rio de Janeiro, Montevideo, cruise to the south and return – and what the future holds. Writes with nostalgia of England and says he sees no end to the voyage.

He enjoys and has been lucky principally in geology and among pelagic animals; has found remains of large extinct animals.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  William Darwin Fox
Date:  [12–13] Nov 1832
Classmark:  Christ’s College Library, Cambridge (MS 53 Fox 46a)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-189

To J. S. Henslow   [c. 26 October –] 24 November [1832]

Summary

A French collector [Alcide d’Orbigny] has been at the Rio Negro and will probably have "taken the cream". CD’s luck with fossil bones, among them a large extinct armadillo-like animal. Describes some birds, toads, Crustacea, and other marine specimens. Nearly all plants flowering at Bahia Blanca were collected. Is sending two large casks of fossil bones by packet.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  John Stevens Henslow
Date:  [c. 26 Oct–] 24 Nov [1832]
Classmark:  Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew (Henslow letters: 14 DAR/1/1/14)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-192

To J. S. Henslow   18 May – 16 June 1832

Summary

His first letter to JSH since December. Recounts his seasickness, geologising and marine collecting at St Jago [Santiago, Cape Verde Is.]; his first tropical forest. Collecting small insects from the tropics. His Welsh trip with Sedgwick has been extremely valuable.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  John Stevens Henslow
Date:  18 May & 16 June 1832
Classmark:  Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew (Henslow letters: 12 DAR/1/1/12)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-171

To J. M. Herbert   [1–6] June 1832

Summary

Summarises experiences since leaving England. "How intimately what may be called the ""moral part"" is connected with the enjoyment of scenery." The loneliness of the voyage.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  John Maurice Herbert
Date:  [1–6] June 1832
Classmark:  American Philosophical Society (Mss.B.D25.4)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-172

To R. W. Darwin   8 February – 1 March 1832

Summary

Writes with great happiness about the first part of the voyage, after his misery from seasickness passed. He finds himself well prepared, the ship quiet, comfortable, and compact; he has already a "rich harvest" and finds the natural history (especially geology) exceedingly interesting. The tropics are full of great beauty.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Robert Waring Darwin
Date:  8 & 26 Feb & 1 Mar [1832]
Classmark:  DAR 223: 8
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-158

To R. W. Darwin   10 February 1832

Summary

Sends a short résumé of his trip on the chance that it will arrive in England earlier than longer letter [158] which he hopes to send by surer means.

He is "incessantly occupied by new and most interesting animals" and thinks he will be able to do some original work in natural history.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Robert Waring Darwin
Date:  10 Feb 1832
Classmark:  DAR 223
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-159

To W. D. Fox   May 1832

Summary

Writes of voyage and his work in natural history: geology, collecting insects (freshwater beetles and spiders at Botofogo Bay); life at sea, sublime views ashore.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  William Darwin Fox
Date:  May 1832
Classmark:  Christ’s College Library, Cambridge (MS 53 Fox 46)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-168

To Caroline Darwin   24 October – 24 November [1832]

Summary

During the past two months CD has been lucky with fossil bones, and he is also finding new specimens of living animals.

He describes an ostrich hunt.

Has received several letters from home.

He enjoys Buenos Aires and admires the señoritas. Tierra del Fuego is next.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Caroline Sarah (Caroline) Darwin; Caroline Sarah (Caroline) Wedgwood
Date:  24 Oct & 24 Nov [1832]
Classmark:  AL incomplete
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-188

To Catherine Darwin   May–June [1832]

Summary

Lists letters received and those sent; comments on family happenings.

The Beagle is back [from Bahia]; two sailors and "little [Charles] Musters" died of fever. In 14 days they sail for Montevideo, then to Rio Negro, then on to where no man is known to have been before.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Emily Catherine (Catherine) Darwin; Emily Catherine (Catherine) Langton
Date:  May–June [1832]
Classmark:  DAR 223
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-169

To Catherine Darwin   5 July [1832]

Summary

Sailing next day to Montevideo. He has taken many hitherto undescribed animals. Describes the glories of the Brazilian forest.

Mentions his concern over the Reform Bill.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Emily Catherine (Catherine) Darwin; Emily Catherine (Catherine) Langton
Date:  5 July [1832]
Classmark:  DAR 223
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-176

To Caroline Darwin    2–6 April 1832

Summary

CD’s enjoyment of the beauty of the tropics is worth all the misery of seasickness. His mail gave him great pleasure. For two weeks he will visit a large estate in the country, and on return live at Botofogo for some weeks, collecting and learning to know the tropics.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Caroline Sarah (Caroline) Darwin; Caroline Sarah (Caroline) Wedgwood
Date:  [2] & 5 & 6 Apr [1832]
Classmark:  DAR 223
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-164

To Caroline Darwin    25–6 April [1832]

Summary

His trip to the interior was full of interest, but exhausting physically. Expects to stay at least a fortnight at Botofogo, because the Beagle returns to Bahia to correct a difference in the longitude measurements. Writes of his companions, of FitzRoy, and of his journal – which he has sent home.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Caroline Sarah (Caroline) Darwin; Caroline Sarah (Caroline) Wedgwood
Date:  25–6 Apr [1832]
Classmark:  DAR 223: 11
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-166
Document type
letter (15)
Author
Darwin, C. R.[X]
Date
1832
02 (1)
03 (1)
04 (2)
05 (3)
06 (1)
07 (3)
08 (1)
10 (2)
11 (1)
letter